LinuxQuestions.org
Welcome to the most active Linux Forum on the web.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 08-14-2008, 08:47 AM   #1
IshanJ
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Aug 2008
Posts: 13

Rep: Reputation: 0
installing new software - difference between windows and linux


  1. Why can we install software by just running a single program (something like a .exe file in windows) in linux?
  2. What is the connection between the standard (or other) libraries and the software(email, sound, graphics) in a linux system?
  3. What are the things one should master in order to build a complete application? For example what we must know if we need to build a simple analog clock with a nice interface? How can we deal with the system when designing software like that?
Please help me!
 
Old 08-14-2008, 09:04 AM   #2
jens
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2004
Location: Belgium
Distribution: Debian, Slackware, Fedora
Posts: 1,367

Rep: Reputation: 233Reputation: 233Reputation: 233
Quote:
Originally Posted by IshanJ View Post
  1. Why can we install software by just running a single program (something like a .exe file in windows) in linux?
  2. What is the connection between the standard (or other) libraries and the software(email, sound, graphics) in a linux system?
  3. What are the things one should master in order to build a complete application? For example what we must know if we need to build a simple analog clock with a nice interface? How can we deal with the system when designing software like that?
Please help me!
1. You can. Most distros use either .deb or .rpm (or .bin and other platform independent ones)

2. Fully depends on your own or distro configurations.
In most cases, Linux uses more shared libs as a Windows system.

3. The same as with any other OS. Unlike with Windows their isn't a default GUI toolkit though. Just pick the one you like. Most is either GTK or QT.

Last edited by jens; 08-14-2008 at 09:15 AM.
 
Old 08-14-2008, 09:42 AM   #3
IshanJ
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Aug 2008
Posts: 13

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Thankz a lot jens. I got a quick reply. Still there are some stuff that I completely don't understand in linux jargon. Still I have no idea about how stuff work in a linux system, things like shared libraries, X windows, compiling the kernel and the like. I really want to learn those things! Hope I will be able to catch them up in few years.
 
Old 08-14-2008, 10:25 AM   #4
onebuck
Moderator
 
Registered: Jan 2005
Location: Midwest USA, Central Illinois
Distribution: SlackwareŽ
Posts: 12,603
Blog Entries: 25

Rep: Reputation: 1981Reputation: 1981Reputation: 1981Reputation: 1981Reputation: 1981Reputation: 1981Reputation: 1981Reputation: 1981Reputation: 1981Reputation: 1981Reputation: 1981
Hi,

Quote:
Originally Posted by IshanJ View Post
Thankz a lot jens. I got a quick reply. Still there are some stuff that I completely don't understand in linux jargon. Still I have no idea about how stuff work in a linux system, things like shared libraries, X windows, compiling the kernel and the like. I really want to learn those things! Hope I will be able to catch them up in few years.
'Linux Documentation Project' is a good source for reference.

A good admin guide to reference is 'Linux Newbie Admin Guide'.

These links and others can be found at 'Slackware-Links'. More than just SlackwareŽ links!
 
Old 08-14-2008, 10:27 AM   #5
jens
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2004
Location: Belgium
Distribution: Debian, Slackware, Fedora
Posts: 1,367

Rep: Reputation: 233Reputation: 233Reputation: 233
Quote:
Originally Posted by IshanJ View Post
Thankz a lot jens. I got a quick reply. Still there are some stuff that I completely don't understand in linux jargon. Still I have no idea about how stuff work in a linux system, things like shared libraries, X windows, compiling the kernel and the like. I really want to learn those things! Hope I will be able to catch them up in few years.
It's all doable in a few days/weeks depending on what you already understand
Just google for easy howtos and don't mind asking what you don't understand.

It also helps if you mention the distro you're using in your profile.

Shared libs are just system libs used by all your default distro apps (static ones usually come with commercial binaries or when the the default ones wont work).

X (XORG or XFree86) is a both a client and a server that provides you a default platform for a graphical desktop.

Building a new kernel is extremely easy if you follow a guide for your specific distro.

Last edited by jens; 08-14-2008 at 10:37 AM.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
installing windows software in linux abhattacharya Linux - Software 2 02-07-2008 12:33 PM
what are the difference between windows and linux? manielec28 Linux - Newbie 6 12-08-2006 09:20 AM
difference between c++ in windows and linux gtgoku Slackware 4 10-26-2003 10:23 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:33 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration