LinuxQuestions.org
Download your favorite Linux distribution at LQ ISO.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices

Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 06-02-2005, 03:47 PM   #1
pas
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Oct 2004
Posts: 12

Rep: Reputation: 0
Installing multiples linux OS


Hi,

I would like to know if I need two /boot partitions if I want to install two linux distros. If no, How can I do it?

Thank You.
 
Old 06-02-2005, 04:08 PM   #2
glimmy
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2005
Location: Minnesota
Distribution: slackware
Posts: 54

Rep: Reputation: 15
You dont need to have two boot partitions. You just need to configure your boot loader to see the other operating system. How you do that depends on if you are using LILO or GRUB
 
Old 06-02-2005, 04:42 PM   #3
pas
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Oct 2004
Posts: 12

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Thank you.
 
Old 06-02-2005, 10:39 PM   #4
bigrigdriver
LQ Addict
 
Registered: Jul 2002
Location: East Centra Illinois, USA
Distribution: Debian Squeeze
Posts: 5,796

Rep: Reputation: 323Reputation: 323Reputation: 323Reputation: 323
Technically, you don't need any boot partition. However, speaking from personal experience, having a separate boot partition can allow you to boot into command-line mode to fix something you broke. So, having a boot partition is a good idea.

How to do it?

Let's say you are installing two distros to a hard disk devoted to Linux (no windows, no bsd, etc). Install the first distro, and write grub to the MBR. Partition the first half of the disk with a boot, home, and root partition.

Then install the second distro to the second half of the disk: boot, home, and root.
But, don't install grub to the MBR; install it to the second boot partition.

Your disk should now be partitioned into: hda1, hda2, hda3, hda4, hda5, and hda6. (In grub, that's hd0,0, hd0,1, hd0,2, hd0,3, hd0,4, and hd0,5).

When you finish installing the second distro, the /boot/grub/menu.lst (or grub.conf if your distro uses that) will have the grub config to boot that distro. Mount the boot partition of the first installation, and copy the config from the second distro into the menu.lst (grub.conf) of the first installation. That way, when you boot, the grub menu will show you both distros.

As a side note, copy the grub config from the first into the second. That way, if one distro breaks, and the other is still bootable, you may be able to boot into the other to fix the broken one.
 
Old 06-02-2005, 11:22 PM   #5
pas
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Oct 2004
Posts: 12

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Thank you so much. Your message was very helpful.

Thank you again.
 
Old 06-03-2005, 12:27 AM   #6
kiraninfotech
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jun 2005
Location: Mumbai,India
Distribution: Fedora 8 x86_64
Posts: 15

Rep: Reputation: 0
Quote:
Originally posted by bigrigdriver
Technically, you don't need any boot partition. However, speaking from personal experience, having a separate boot partition can allow you to boot into command-line mode to fix something you broke. So, having a boot partition is a good idea.

How to do it?

Let's say you are installing two distros to a hard disk devoted to Linux (no windows, no bsd, etc). Install the first distro, and write grub to the MBR. Partition the first half of the disk with a boot, home, and root partition.

Then install the second distro to the second half of the disk: boot, home, and root.
But, don't install grub to the MBR; install it to the second boot partition.

Your disk should now be partitioned into: hda1, hda2, hda3, hda4, hda5, and hda6. (In grub, that's hd0,0, hd0,1, hd0,2, hd0,3, hd0,4, and hd0,5).

When you finish installing the second distro, the /boot/grub/menu.lst (or grub.conf if your distro uses that) will have the grub config to boot that distro. Mount the boot partition of the first installation, and copy the config from the second distro into the menu.lst (grub.conf) of the first installation. That way, when you boot, the grub menu will show you both distros.

As a side note, copy the grub config from the first into the second. That way, if one distro breaks, and the other is still bootable, you may be able to boot into the other to fix the broken one.
Thats true you just need / partion to install any *nix OS. Install a boot loader with any 1 os which u installed first on mbr. When you install other OS install boot loader on it own / partition not on mbr.Then just add the boot record of every os u install to main grub boot loader on mbr.DONE
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Setting nfs wsize to multiples of 1024 on RHAS 2.1 zeezoz Linux - Enterprise 0 01-06-2005 04:02 AM
Setting nfs wsize to multiples of 1024 on RHAS 2.1 zeezoz Red Hat 0 01-05-2005 12:00 PM
Split large file into multiples jdozarchuk Linux - Newbie 1 11-04-2004 10:42 AM
encode multiples files with lame kevinlux Linux - Software 4 09-19-2004 12:53 PM
email sending multiples of all messages Michele Linux - Newbie 1 02-19-2001 10:42 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:31 PM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration