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Old 07-07-2005, 03:10 PM   #31
aysiu
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Quote:
Originally posted by inq_ah
However I do have once concern. This is actually about my Internet connection.
I went and started trying to configure my network (internet) connection yesterday.
I think I found the issue - my Ethernet card is not detected, or better to say not supported by Linux. It is just my guess. I checked in the big book of Secret of Linux, there is a list of Ethernet cards supported by Linux and also couldn't find my.
I have: Network Adapter = Broadcom 440x 10/100 Integrated Controller and I didn't find it in the list of Ethernet cards. And RH also said so - something like: "Failed to find the ethernet card...".

So what do I do in this case? This card is working perfectly fine with my 1st HD (Windows XP)...
It's totally your call, of course, but I find the ethernet detection failing to be a dealbreaker. Truth is, about 80% of the time, there's going to be at least one piece of hardware that a given Linux distribution does not recognize. It may be the monitor resolution. It may be the sound card. It may be the mouse. It may be the internet connection. Generally, I would say if there's only one thing not working, you can find a workaround, usually. The unfortunate thing about the internet connection not working (as opposed to the screen resolution) is that you can't do online research about the problem without booting into Windows. That means if someone says, "To fix that, type such-and-such into the terminal," you have to print that out, reboot, log into Linux, try it out. Then reboot, log into Windows, and say, "That didn't work. Can we try something else?"

I would seriously consider trying another distribution.

If not, here's some general information about your network adapter's drivers and Linux:
http://www.linuxquestions.org/hcl/sh...p?product=1196
http://members.driverguide.com/drive...riverid=236429
http://www.broadcom.com/drivers/faq_drivers.php

I'm not expert on drivers. In fact, every single one of those links popped up just by my copying and pasting your driver's name into Google and typing "Linux" afterwards.

Quote:
Yes, I installed the Grub boot loader in the MBR. Arnaud_B helped me a lot - no confusion here and I was not confused at all
I just analized the situation and decided that it would be much safer for me to have 2 separate HDs with XP and RH on separate drives.
NOTE:
In both books I have it is recommended to setup GRUB on the Master Boot Record (which is located on the first sector of PC's hard disk (C: drive). However. I think it would be better if to select First sector of the Linux boot partition. I figured it out yesterday.
I've disconnected my HD with RD linux and and system was giving me the following error on boot: "GRUB disk error -". Or something like this...

Also same "GRUB disk error -" would happen if one decides (as I did) to use external enclosure ofr HD based on the USB connection....
The reason I said he confused you is that it may be "safer" to use a second hard drive (though, if you set up partitioning properly and back up your data, I don't see why it isn't safe to dual-boot on one hard drive), it's also more confusing, and you get all the problems you're running into now. The issue, I think, is that Grub is now located on your first hard drive, but the grub configuration is on your second hard drive. Since these two hard drives are physically separated, that might be your issue.

Just a suggestion, but you might want to try dual-booting from the first hard drive, installing Grub on the MBR, then using the second hard drive formatted as FAT32 to share files between Windows and Linux.

Quote:
I liked your website!
http://www.psychocats.net/essays/linuxguide.php
I've printed it out and will learn it today on my way home!

Thanks a lot! It really means a lot to me, that there so many great people here!
Andrew
P.S. I promise - once I'll become Linux savy - will alos help all the new comers (inspired by you guys...). [/B]
Glad you found that helpful. I'm fairly new myself!
 
Old 07-07-2005, 06:09 PM   #32
inq_ah
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Registered: Jun 2005
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Hi Aysiu,

Lets proceed the same way we did before (for your last post).
1) In regards to feedback # 1:
---------------------------------------
Well, as I've mentioned before, I'm going to install new distro = FC4. I still didn't find it, the latest I found is FC3. BTW, they list 3 CD ISOs and one DVD. What is DVD for?

Thanks for the link!
http://www.broadcom.com/drivers/faq_drivers.php

I found the driver and instuctions how to upload into Linux.
I hope

BTW - you scared me with 80% statistics that Linux doesn't find the drivers...
The main thinbg why I'm getting scared is that so far we have only one PC and if it is "gone" due to my experiments - my wife will physically kill No internet - no hubby
So I'm planning to get another PC - I just found very chip one. This way, I'll be able to practice as much as I want without hurting our main PC.

2) In regards to feedback # 2:
---------------------------------------
As I mentioned before - once I have 2nd PC - will be able to try and set up partitioning properly and back up my data and install dual-boot on one hard drive

Q: ABOUT THE NEXT LINE:
"Just a suggestion, but you might want to try dual-booting from the first hard drive, installing Grub on the MBR, then using the second hard drive formatted as FAT32 to share files between Windows and Linux".
=> ISN'T IT WHAT i HAVE NOW? I have NTFS on 1st HD with XP on it. I have 2nd HD with Linux and I guess it is FAT or FAT32???

Also for my install of FC4 (or FC3), I am really not sure what to do in regards to GRUB. SO here is my goal in case and I have 2 HDs each of which has its own OS: one XP (Master) and FC4 (slave): IF I DECIDE TO REMOVE THE SALVE (FC4), FROM pc, i STILL WOULD LIKE TO BE ABLE TO GET INTO xp.

Thanks alot!
Andrew
 
Old 07-09-2005, 11:40 PM   #33
jschiwal
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Quote:
=> ISN'T IT WHAT i HAVE NOW? I have NTFS on 1st HD with XP on it. I have 2nd HD with Linux and I guess it is FAT or FAT32???
I wouldn't recommend running linux with the FAT or FAT32 (vfat) filesystems. These file systems don't hold the permission bits that you need to run linux. You could have a separate partition on the second drive with FAT32. Mandrake defaults to using EXT3 while if I remember correctly, FC prefers the ReiserFS. Both are Journalling File Systems which allows better recovery and faster boot times should you have a crash or power failure.
 
Old 07-10-2005, 02:24 AM   #34
aysiu
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Quote:
Originally posted by inq_ah
Well, as I've mentioned before, I'm going to install new distro = FC4. I still didn't find it, the latest I found is FC3. BTW, they list 3 CD ISOs and one DVD. What is DVD for?
You couldn't find Fedora Core 4? Did you look here? Usually (and I can't say for sure because I haven't used Fedora in a long time) when a distribution has three CDs or one DVD (and it is or, not and--you use either the three CDs or the one DVD), the first CD is the installer and basic apps. The other two CDs contain a lot of extra applications to install. The DVD is a one-disc equivalent of these three CDs (as DVDs can hold more information than CDs can). If you don't have dial-up, you can use just the first CD and download the rest of the applications separately. I found this to be true for Mandriva and Debian. Should be try for FC, as well.

Quote:
BTW - you scared me with 80% statistics that Linux doesn't find the drivers...
No, nothing to be scared about. A lot of times, the hardware not recognized is something as simple as the optimal monitor resolution. For example, when I installed Ubuntu on my computer, everything else worked except the resolution was at 640 x 800. All I did was edit the /etc/X11/xorg.conf file (which I found out how to do by Googling about screen resolutions and Linux), add in two lines, and my screen resolution was fixed. Note: I dual-boot, and even before I fixed the screen resolution after installing Ubuntu, the screen resolution in XP was unaffected. It doesn't mean the actual hardware fails. And it doesn't mean that Windows' setup will in any way be damaged. It simply means you have to do a little research on how to get Linux configured for your computer.

Quote:
The main thinbg why I'm getting scared is that so far we have only one PC and if it is "gone" due to my experiments - my wife will physically kill No internet - no hubby
That's why backing up is so important. If you have only one computer, have you considered trying out live Linux CDs? That's a great way to not damage your computer and see which Linux distribution recognizes your hardware best. Ubuntu and Mepis both have live CDs. I'm not sure about Fedora.

Quote:
So I'm planning to get another PC - I just found very chip one. This way, I'll be able to practice as much as I want without hurting our main PC.
This is the ideal solution, of course, because then you don't even have to bother with a dual-boot. And every time you install Linux, you can use the express install option instead of the expert install or manual partition options.

Quote:
=> ISN'T IT WHAT i HAVE NOW? I have NTFS on 1st HD with XP on it. I have 2nd HD with Linux and I guess it is FAT or FAT32???
. It shouldn't be. Linux doesn't run natively on FAT32. Windows 95, 98, and ME run natively on FAT32. Windows XP, NT, and 2000 run natively on NTFS. And Linux runs natively on EXT2, EXT3, and Reiserfs. The idea is that you want to have one partition that is NTFS (Windows XP), one partition that is FAT32 (all the documents, pictures, and music you have), and one partition that is probably EXT3 (depends on the Linux distribution you use). Both Windows and Linux can read from and write to FAT32, but it's not ideal to install either Windows XP or Linux on a FAT32 filesystem.

Quote:
Also for my install of FC4 (or FC3), I am really not sure what to do in regards to GRUB. SO here is my goal in case and I have 2 HDs each of which has its own OS: one XP (Master) and FC4 (slave): IF I DECIDE TO REMOVE THE SALVE (FC4), FROM pc, i STILL WOULD LIKE TO BE ABLE TO GET INTO xp.
Well, I'm no expert on this, but my guess is that as long as you never picked the FC4 option in the Grub menu, you wouldn't get an error, but who knows?

Last edited by aysiu; 07-10-2005 at 02:25 AM.
 
Old 07-10-2005, 12:11 PM   #35
sundialsvcs
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One thing I'd strongly suggest that you do is... buy a second disk drive. Your computer probably has two IDE-type device chains so that you can install the additional device. Once you get it working properly, e.g. on Windows, you have an entirely separate play-pen to work from.

Some machines actually allow you to choose which device to boot from, at the BIOS level, so that you can literally do the dual-boot selection at that point. You can then have two, in-effect entirely separate, systems to work from. Obviously, the two operating systems would be able to "see" one another, but if the partition-type is not one that the other chooses to recognize, there will be no conflicts between them.

Or, while you are fooling with things, consider getting an entirely separate computer from someone's junk-heap. I have seen perfectly satisfactory machines out there which are literally "yours for the asking."
 
Old 07-10-2005, 02:34 PM   #36
inq_ah
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Registered: Jun 2005
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Hi Guys,

Thanks a lot - you didn't forget me.

Due to the technical (family staff - I didn't get a chance to:
1) Buy another unexpensive PC.
2) Install FC 4/3.

However I got a chance to experiment with my RH. For example:
Success stories:
---------------------------------
a) Somehow I always thought that I'm working from KDE, naa - turned out I was using GNOME. So I learned to switch to KDE -> and it is much better!!!
b) I configured my printer and now it works (at least I succeed in this)!
c) I created new users and feel much comfortable about this.

Failures
----------------------------------
A) Somehow my KDE doesnt have Kpackage. Well, I said - it is even better - I'll learn to install the drivers using the Terminal
I've tried both methods - rpm and tar and failed in both
With tar it said: "Makefile: 18: ***Linux Kernel source tree not found. Stop". I'm getting this after I ran make .
With rmp, it just failed to run it properly, there were couple of errors, after rpmbuild -bb
The worse part of this it was a driver that you guys helped me to found for my Broadcom Ethernet adaptor...and I had high hopes, that after I'll install it - I'll have my window to the outer world be opened...

B) I also found that my sound card is not recognized properly, but it bothers me less, as I'm not much into music etc.
Both books I have (I have no idea what they think when they write those books) are written like everything is going perfect - no errors, no exceptions...
=> Especially secrets of Linux...

Thanks again guys!
Have a Great Weekend!
Andrew
 
Old 07-10-2005, 03:05 PM   #37
aysiu
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Registered: May 2005
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Have you considered using another distro? Some people like Red Hat/Fedora, but I don't think they're working for you. I'd suggest using a Debian-based distro like Mepis or Ubuntu. Synaptic Package Manager/apt-get is a very easy way to install software, and both Mepis and Ubuntu have live CDs (they don't affect your hard drive, but you can see if they recognize your hardware). In fact, Mepis is both a live CD and installer CD. Mepis is almost entirely point-and-click (you can still use the command-line if you want to, though) and will automatically put your other partitions on the desktop.
 
Old 07-11-2005, 01:09 PM   #38
inq_ah
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Registered: Jun 2005
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You are right!

Thanks a lot!
I've already heard very many good feedback on both distro's of Debian.

Will go with it. And will keep you posted guys!
Thank you again!
Andrew
 
  


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