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Old 12-28-2005, 02:07 AM   #1
Epox
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Exclamation Installing GRUB for 4 OSes


Hi,

I am building a new computer and on it will be 2 LEGAL installations of WindowsXP, 1 RedHat installation, and 1 Windows 2000 Installation. I need to develope a plan for installing all of these OSes and the bootloader so that I can do it effenciently when the computer is finally built.

The trip to this is that I am going to be using two serial ATA drives and one will have multiple partitions to hold the OSes and program data, while the other will be my personal storage.


So I am pretty much wondering 1) in what order should I install these OSes and 2) how do I install GRUB to see all of them. 3)Also, how do I set custom backgrounds for GRUB?


! on a side note, if I make my second drive a FAT32 drive so that I can share data between windows and linux, will that hurt anything as far as how much storage space I'll have on that drive, or performance of that drive?

I'm sure you can very easily just post a link the the GRUB online manual, but I am not looking for that here (i already know where it is), I am looking for a general workflow of what I am going to need to do and possibly some advice/tips on what to expect.

Thank you for your time!
 
Old 12-28-2005, 02:12 AM   #2
LinuxChimp
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The answer is yes
 
Old 12-28-2005, 10:04 PM   #3
Epox
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Ugh..

Nobody here knows how to help??
 
Old 12-28-2005, 10:54 PM   #4
Baldrick65
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I would install the all the Windows first and then Linux. Here is a little background info for you to read as well. Also if it's in a raid configuration, then you might want to read this.

Baldrick

Last edited by Baldrick65; 12-28-2005 at 10:56 PM.
 
Old 12-28-2005, 11:03 PM   #5
reddazz
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Install your Windows OSes first, make sure you know where they are in installed (in Linux hard drive names) and then install your Linux distro. Once that done, grub should be auto configured to boot your windows OSes, if not, you can do it manually by editing your /boot/grub/menu.lst or /boot/grub.conf. If you search for "grub+boot+windows", you will find many articles that show you how to configure grub to boot windows. As for changing grub backgrounds, I think its in the documentation on the grub website. Having FAT on your second drive is a good idea because Linux can't write to NTFS (well it can but its experimental) and I am sure it won't affect anything on your system.
 
Old 12-28-2005, 11:04 PM   #6
fair_is_fair
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Install 2000 first, then xp, then xp, and then linux. You should be able to add the windows partitions to grub during the linux install or grub may do it itself.

Fat32 is the way to go for data sharing. You can always format a separate partition as ntfs for large files and security.
 
Old 12-30-2005, 12:28 PM   #7
Epox
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Ahhh okay, thanks guys.

Also, I've always used RedHat. But what is the latest favorite Distro out these days?
 
Old 12-30-2005, 12:39 PM   #8
pljvaldez
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Epox,

I have an alternative way that I like to multiboot OS's: I use XOSL 1.15. XOSL lets you hide partitions so that you can install up to 32 operating systems on one HD (I only have 8...). Basically, the difference is that you must install grub to the root partition of the linux distro instead of the MBR because XOSL takes over the MBR, then chainloads the other boot loaders.

I still always install the windows OS's first though...

As for favorite distro's, you'll start a flamewar with that one. IMHO, Debian and Ubuntu are the best (I'm more of a pure Debian kind of guy), but check out http://distrowatch.com/ to see the current popular trends.
 
Old 12-30-2005, 12:50 PM   #9
cuiq
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Quote:
3)Also, how do I set custom backgrounds for GRUB?
http://ruslug.rutgers.edu/~mcgrof/grub-images/

Since the other questions were answered I figured I'd go with this one.


Peace V
 
Old 12-30-2005, 01:03 PM   #10
saikee
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The latest Red Hat is version 9. Fedora is supposed to be its successor and Fedora Core 5 is already in the circulation.

You may pick up a few tips for booting the 4 systems from this thread that boots over 100. The hide, unhide and map statements should be of some use to you.

I don't have any preference of installing which system first because there no technical ground to prevent it to be done from any order. When I started to learn Grub I used it to boot 4 copies of the same XP.
 
Old 12-30-2005, 01:04 PM   #11
Epox
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pljvaldez
Epox,

I have an alternative way that I like to multiboot OS's: I use XOSL 1.15. XOSL lets you hide partitions so that you can install up to 32 operating systems on one HD (I only have 8...). Basically, the difference is that you must install grub to the root partition of the linux distro instead of the MBR because XOSL takes over the MBR, then chainloads the other boot loaders.
Im not so sure I understand why one would need to hide partitions.

Can't I just install the OSes on different partitions and use theb bootloader without hiding them?I don't think I have to hide anything with my current or past dual boot machines.

and THANK YOU SO MUCH for bringing up XOSL. I forgot all about it~! I was interested in it a good while ago.


And thank you too, cuiq. I Appreciate the link!
 
Old 12-30-2005, 01:13 PM   #12
pixellany
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Why on earth do you wnat to install 2 instances of XP--AND 2000???!!!

conventional wisdom--install Windows first, then use the "chainloader" feature of GRUB to access Windows.

Out of curiousity, can **Windows** handle being installed twice?---ie. will the Windows installer see an instance already there and set up NTLDR to access it? If so, you can set up all the Windows installs and then put Redhat on a different partition or different drive and acces it thru a boot floppy.
 
Old 12-30-2005, 01:15 PM   #13
pljvaldez
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Epox,

Hiding partitions used to be necessary for older versions of windows. Windows 98 used to be required to reside on the first primary partition of the hard drive. If it was in a logical partition or the second primary partition, it would barf all over itself and fail to load. So you had to hide any FAT or NTFS partitions that existed prior to the Win98 partition. That way it would assume that it was the first partition. Anyway, to make a long story short, I'm not sure it is necessary anymore because I haven't actually touched any of my Windows partitions in some time.
 
Old 12-30-2005, 01:27 PM   #14
Epox
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pixellany
Why on earth do you wnat to install 2 instances of XP--AND 2000???!!!

conventional wisdom--install Windows first, then use the "chainloader" feature of GRUB to access Windows.

Out of curiousity, can **Windows** handle being installed twice?---ie. will the Windows installer see an instance already there and set up NTLDR to access it? If so, you can set up all the Windows installs and then put Redhat on a different partition or different drive and acces it thru a boot floppy.
XP would be my main OS, and I'd want two instances incase one got infected with a virus, broken or somehow mangled and couldn't boot.

The 2000 installation is for a special server mode I do once a week. I'm using a very stripped version of 2000 for that.

and Yes, windows can be installed twice.
If you install windows XP onto a 80GB drive, then use a partition tool to create a 2nd partition on that same drive, you can install XP again and when you reboot you'll be given a bootmenu to choose which installation you want to run.
 
Old 12-30-2005, 01:34 PM   #15
pixellany
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Epox
XP would be my main OS, and I'd want two instances incase one got infected with a virus, broken or somehow mangled and couldn't boot.
.
Personally, I would not do this. The simple reason is that the two will very quickly get into different configurations and cause significant confusion when going from one to the other.
When Windows goes south I typically just do a clean install. (Data is always on a different physical drive). The other option is to clone the drive (partition) with Windows on it. Norton Ghost or equivalent can do this---or "dd" from Linux.

The "occassional server" I would put on a separate machine. If its just a server, It doesn't need a monitor and can be a very cheap box. You can also use two boxes with a KVM switch
 
  


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