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Old 12-23-2010, 03:48 PM   #1
thorgamma
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Installing Debian - will it partition both drives when I only want one?


Got to this install screen and am stopping to ask for advice. I'm at the

[!!] Partition Disks

screen and both of my disks are listed. I only want the first one for Linux, the second is to stay as-is (with Windows XP and all my files).

Here's the disk info on the screen:

IDE1 master (hda) - 40.0 GB WDC WD400EB-00CPF0
pri/log 40.0 GB FREE SPACE
SCSI1(0,0,0) (sda) / 80.0 GB ATA ST380815AS
#1 primary 80.0 GB B ntfs
pri/log 8.2 MB FREE SPACE

Now the option to continue is:

"Finish partitioning and write changes to disk"

There's a help file to select here, and it says something about being able to change later and that the disk to be kept as is will be marked with a "K".

I just want to be sure that if I click on past this scary screen, I'll be able to get it right on a subsequent screen. Or could I have missed something? I don't see any other options in repeatedly going back and checking where I've been.

Can anyone reassure me or tell me where I'm going wrong, please?

Thanks!

Mark
 
Old 12-23-2010, 04:10 PM   #2
EDDY1
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At that point you scroll down to drive and/or partition you want to install on.

Also use advanced options and expert mode for at the first screen,
that way you'll be able to add non-free and less configuring.

Use guided partitioning
After you select the partition you want to install on you'll be given the option seperate /usr/home or 1 partition, at that point you're on your own.

But if you choose seperate guided sets default values
If you're uncomfortable just keep testing and don't write changes to disk until you are!
Good luck

Last edited by EDDY1; 12-23-2010 at 04:23 PM.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 12-23-2010, 05:29 PM   #3
thorgamma
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EDDY1 View Post
At that point you scroll down to drive and/or partition you want to install on.

Also use advanced options and expert mode for at the first screen,
that way you'll be able to add non-free and less configuring.

Use guided partitioning
After you select the partition you want to install on you'll be given the option seperate /usr/home or 1 partition, at that point you're on your own.

But if you choose seperate guided sets default values
If you're uncomfortable just keep testing and don't write changes to disk until you are!
Good luck
Thanks for the help. It appears I have installed more or less successfully and XP still works. Now, it looks like I just need to figure out how to get Grub to work, but I'll search for posts on that.
 
Old 12-23-2010, 06:36 PM   #4
EDDY1
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If grub2 (1.98)

open terminal under Applications>Accessaries>Terminal
execute
sudo os-prober

sudo update-grub
 
Old 12-23-2010, 07:19 PM   #5
bonixavier
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EDDY1 View Post
If grub2 (1.98)

open terminal under Applications>Accessaries>Terminal
execute
sudo os-prober

sudo update-grub
Read my signature, the thread title and try to rephrase your post.
 
Old 12-23-2010, 07:54 PM   #6
EDDY1
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Quote:
Read my signature, the thread title and try to rephrase your post.
I should've stated that it was an admin task, but I didn't.
There is a reason though.
If I don't give him correct command it'll fail.
If I tell him about it he'll use it with everything and not read up on it, and know the dangers.

2 commands.

Last edited by EDDY1; 12-23-2010 at 07:55 PM.
 
Old 12-23-2010, 08:07 PM   #7
bonixavier
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EDDY1 View Post
I should've stated that it was an admin task, but I didn't.
There is a reason though.
If I don't give him correct command it'll fail.
If I tell him about it he'll use it with everything and not read up on it, and know the dangers.

2 commands.
When you install Debian, it asks you for the root password. If you supply one, the default method for performing administrative tasks is starting a root shell, by typing su. I know it can be changed, but, by default, if the user types "sudo vim /etc/apt/sources.list" for example, he will get a lecture, will provide his password and will be informed: "username is not in the sudoers group. The incident will be reported." Which means your command will fail.

Can all distros can be set to operate based on sudo? Yes, they can. However, what is the default? Logging in as root. Keep that in mind when not in ubuntuforums.org
 
Old 12-23-2010, 08:32 PM   #8
EDDY1
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I apoligize for what I put out there,
but once "su" is typed in it gives unlimited powers that last throuh-out the session, so if user stays in that terminal everything he does will be done as root, which is more dangerous for a newbie.

Whereas "sudo" is 1 command and returns to user state, which is safer.

Last edited by EDDY1; 12-23-2010 at 08:34 PM.
 
Old 12-23-2010, 08:39 PM   #9
bonixavier
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EDDY1 View Post
I apoligize for what I put out there,
but once "su" is typed in it gives unlimited powers that last throuh-out the session, so if user stays in that terminal everything he does will be done as root, which is more dangerous for a newbie.

Whereas "sudo" is 1 command and returns to user state, which is safer.
Two or three reinstalls are enough for people to become more careful. I guess that's why I like Slackware. It assumes nothing about me.
 
Old 12-23-2010, 08:49 PM   #10
EDDY1
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The person who is installing hasn't done it 2 or 3 times.
When they're ready they'll either learn both commands and also if necessary how to log into system as root, but they're not ready.

I have Debian Squeeze and most of my tasks can be done with sudo, I can login to root which the GUI is disabled by default,
which is easily remedied, but don't need it.

So I haven't found a need to do so.

Last edited by EDDY1; 12-23-2010 at 08:50 PM.
 
Old 12-24-2010, 07:58 AM   #11
the trooper
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Quote:
I have Debian Squeeze and most of my tasks can be done with sudo
That's because you have configured your system this way.
By default Debian does not use sudo.
As explained above the command will fail.

Here's an example:

Quote:
ade@Pc1:~$ sudo aptitude install xine

We trust you have received the usual lecture from the local System
Administrator. It usually boils down to these three things:

#1) Respect the privacy of others.
#2) Think before you type.
#3) With great power comes great responsibility.

[sudo] password for ade:
Sorry, user ade is not allowed to execute '/usr/bin/aptitude install xine' as root on Pc1.ade.
ade@Pc1:~$
 
Old 12-24-2010, 11:28 AM   #12
EDDY1
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Trooper I never said sudo was the default.

I said "root gui login" disabled by default.

But debian installer in expert mode asks if you want root priviledges.
If you say yes it will setup superuser account sudo

Last edited by EDDY1; 12-24-2010 at 11:30 AM.
 
Old 12-24-2010, 11:56 AM   #13
thorgamma
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Follow-up on the installation

Thanks to everyone who helped. Here's what I did to get it working:

I have one hard drive that was connected to the motherboard at SATA0. It's connected by a small bundle of wires. This has Windows XP installed and all my stuff. The other hard drive is on a strip - I think it says IDE on the motherboard connection.

I tried to do various things with the GRUB installation, but I figured that the computer never looked at the second drive on startup. And I didn't want to partition the main drive. So, I tried connecting the first hard drive to SATA1, which was open on the motherboard and voila! It works great now. (Except that the hard drive I used for this purpose is annoyingly loud and old, but that's another story.)

Thanks again!

Mark (thorgamma)
 
  


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