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Old 01-08-2016, 07:41 PM   #16
offgridguy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joe_2000 View Post
In fact it turns out it does. /usr/sbin is typically not in the PATH variable of the regular user, which is why your system said the command wasn't known.

Run it as root and it should work.
I think I see the problem, pkgtool and slackpkg are included in my Slackware install, but somehow, I have to activate them. I see this in the man pages.

[Before you do anything, you will need to uncomment one mirror in
/etc/slackpkg/mirrors file and run:

# slackpkg update]
I am not sure how to do this? What is the command to launch slackpkg from the command line?
 
Old 01-08-2016, 08:22 PM   #17
joe_2000
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Quote:
Originally Posted by offgridguy View Post
I think I see the problem, pkgtool and slackpkg are included in my Slackware install, but somehow, I have to activate them. I see this in the man pages.

[Before you do anything, you will need to uncomment one mirror in
/etc/slackpkg/mirrors file and run:

# slackpkg update]
I am not sure how to do this? What is the command to launch slackpkg from the command line?
The command to run slackpkg is slackpkg. But you must be root. Have you tried running the command as root?

Don't get me wrong, but are you sure that slackware is the right distro for you? How did you choose / what are your requirements?
If you chose Slackware because the main goal is learning linux, then you should start doing a bit more research on your own.

If really you only want to get an OS up and running quickly consider using a distro that does a bit more hand holding, such as e.g. Linux Mint or Ubuntu...
 
Old 01-08-2016, 10:55 PM   #18
offgridguy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joe_2000 View Post
The command to run slackpkg is slackpkg. But you must be root. Have you tried running the command as root?

Don't get me wrong, but are you sure that slackware is the right distro for you? How did you choose / what are your requirements?
If you chose Slackware because the main goal is learning linux, then you should start doing a bit more research on your own.

If really you only want to get an OS up and running quickly consider using a distro that does a bit more hand holding, such as e.g. Linux Mint or Ubuntu...
I understand what you are saying here. I have been looking for a basic tutorial for Slackware for beginners ,so to speak. Are you aware of any?
I have tried ubuntu and Mint. Mint in particular is very user friendly, you could probably function very well and never use the command line. But it's because of using systems like these including windows that i haven't learned much about the 'nuts & bolts of computer operation. I have purchased several ebooks on the subject. these include. The Linux Command Line Beginners Guide
The Ubuntu Beginners Guide Seventh Edition
The Linux Mint Beginners Guide
The Windows Command Line Beginners Guide
These have all been very helpful, but it's a big learning curve. As good as the books are, I can't ask questions there, which is why I come here. I can understand why you
question my choice, given my lack of proficiency. My apologies, I certainly don't mean to waste your time, I appreciate all the help. As far as Slackware goes, I like it and would like to learn it, even if takes me a long time to get up to speed. It's not a system I expect to master without a lot of work and time, but even small progress is very gratifying.
 
Old 01-09-2016, 07:37 AM   #19
joe_2000
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Quote:
Originally Posted by offgridguy View Post
My apologies, I certainly don't mean to waste your time,
Sorry, this came across the wrong way. I didn't mean to imply you are wasting my time. I was just genuinely trying to make sure you are making an informed distro choice.

Using slackware for learning is a valid choice, although for beginners it's probably one of the toughest one around. There are others which can teach you a ton without requiring a learning curve that steep. (This statement is controversial and just represents my personal opinion).

Consider e.g. Debian. It has a very mature package management and one of the largest software repositories available. Installation is simple and straightforward and mostly does not require too much configuration tweaks to get things working. At the same time, it does a lot less hand holding than the *buntus and does not try to hide complexity under pretty but limited GUI tools.

Slackware, on the other hand, follows a different approach. It's designed for users who want absolute control over their system. As such, not even dependency management is handled automatically. The package choice available through the standard package management tool is reasonable, but nowhere nearly as large as with Debian or the *buntus.
This means that for a large number of packages you need to compile and install from source.

There are sites such as Slackbuild.org which provide bash scripts that simplify the process, but if you don't know what you are doing things can get complicated quickly.

At this point, I can recommend two routes to you:
If you want to stick with Slackware, familiarize yourself with slackpkg first. Once you are confident with that, try to get the hang of using Slackbuild.org. Be aware that for any system maintenance task you need to work as root, i.e. you have to switch to the root user with the su command before anything else.

The other alternative would be a step by step approach in terms of distro choice. My personal distro history since I first started using Linux back in 2009 looked like this:
- Ubuntu
- Debian
- Debian-derivatives
- Arch
- Debian unstable-based Aptosid for a while
- Now I am using Slackware and Void (and still Debian on my server)
- At some point I also did the LFS install, but never really used it productively.

To me, this felt like the perfect approach. I kept learning stuff all the time but the learning curve never was so steep that it got frustrating.

One other thing I can recommend to you is to reach out to your local Linux User Group. Search the web for the one that is near your hometown and get in touch with them. If they have regular meetings, attend them. You'll be surprised how much faster you can learn if you can talk to knowledgeable people in person.

Last not least, once again, please don't be discouraged by my previous post to ask questions here at LQ. We are here to help, and people who find your questions too basic are free not to answer them. Note however that showing effort and researching on your own will get you results faster, be more gratifying and will increase the overall willingness of people to help.
 
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Old 01-09-2016, 11:04 AM   #20
offgridguy
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Thank you for the very helpful suggestions. Like you my introduction to Linux was Ubuntu. Although it is an easy transition from Windows, lacking even the basic command line skills, I always felt a lack of control with Ubuntu. I have used Ubuntu recently and can happily say that is no longer the case.
I considered a lot of distro's and tried sabayon, but due to a limited internet connection, a rolling distro doesn't work for me. I actually bought the Slackware install CD about 3 years ago and only recently installed it. I have been away from Linux for that time. I am realizing that Slackware is difficult to learn but my computing needs are simple and I am sure it will work for me, giving me much needed experience along the way.
 
Old 01-09-2016, 11:27 AM   #21
offgridguy
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Regarding the browser installation, I realize now that the real issue here is that my user account has to be added to the sudoers file, to be able to use the sudo command.
I could run the slackpkg command as root, but since I never go online as root I don't need an upgraded browser for my root account. So I will have to install it from my user account
once I have configured my sudoers file. There is a lot of reading in the sudoer man pages so it may be awhile before I get back here. (if my assumptions above are incorrect please point it out)
 
Old 01-09-2016, 01:24 PM   #22
joe_2000
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Quote:
Originally Posted by offgridguy View Post
Regarding the browser installation, I realize now that the real issue here is that my user account has to be added to the sudoers file, to be able to use the sudo command.
I could run the slackpkg command as root, but since I never go online as root I don't need an upgraded browser for my root account. So I will have to install it from my user account
once I have configured my sudoers file. There is a lot of reading in the sudoer man pages so it may be awhile before I get back here. (if my assumptions above are incorrect please point it out)
In fact they are. Installing as root will lead to the same result as via sudo. Using sudo for eveything is an Ubuntu thing.
Install as root. NEVER start the browser as root.
 
Old 01-09-2016, 01:30 PM   #23
joe_2000
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Originally Posted by offgridguy View Post
I actually bought the Slackware install CD about 3 years ago and only recently installed it.
Which probably means your install is a bit outdated, and explains why you found firefox not to be as up to date as you'd like it to be.
 
Old 01-09-2016, 02:03 PM   #24
offgridguy
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Thank you joe_2000

Edit: I have decided to order the new version 14.1 and install that.
This will give me the latest Slackware release and save doing upgrades. The experience I have gained with this first install will prove invaluable. Thanks to everyone.

Last edited by offgridguy; 01-09-2016 at 03:27 PM.
 
Old 01-09-2016, 03:39 PM   #25
joe_2000
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Quote:
Originally Posted by offgridguy View Post
Thank you joe_2000

Edit: I have decided to order the new version 14.1 and install that.
This will give me the latest Slackware release and save doing upgrades. The experience I have gained with this first install will prove invaluable. Thanks to everyone.
I think that's a good decision. Note however that you'll still need to do updates to get security patches.

The commands (which you can already practice on your current install) are (to be run as root)
Code:
slackpkg update
slackpkg upgrade-all
Obviously that's after you activated a mirror unless you already did that.
 
Old 01-09-2016, 04:17 PM   #26
offgridguy
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Thanks joe_2000. Following your advice even further, I am getting Debian as well, I have heard about Debian for a long time but have never tried it yet. I currently have one laptop dual booted with Windows 10 and Linux Mint. I will replace Mint with Debian.

Edit; Following up on the advice I have a updated and upgraded slackpkg using these commands.

slackpkg update
slackpkg upgrade-all

About a 500 mb download.

Last edited by offgridguy; 01-10-2016 at 07:31 PM.
 
  


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