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Old 12-04-2011, 08:18 PM   #1
ralv
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Install i386 or AMD 64


Hi, I'm new in Linux and my first Linux distribution is Debian, but I have a question. Mi laptop is Acer Aspire 5538 and my processor is:

AMD Turion 64 X2 processor L510 (1.60Ghz), which one is better? i386 or AMD 64. If I install i386 with my processor, is that wrong? or I must use Debian AMD 64 because of my processor? What problem can I have? Thank you.
 
Old 12-04-2011, 08:28 PM   #2
MS3FGX
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You have 64 bit hardware, so you should be using a 64 bit OS to get the most out of it.
 
Old 12-04-2011, 08:28 PM   #3
jhwilliams
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There are a lot of existing threads about 64 bit vs. 32 bit.

The only practical consideration has to do with memory. If you have 2GB or less, say, it doesn't matter which you install. If you have 4GB or more, just install the 64-bit version. So, either way, the 64 bit version will work. Why not just install that?
 
Old 12-04-2011, 08:33 PM   #4
ralv
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My RAM is 4 GB. After reading your responses it seems pretty obvious that I use 64-bit, but what happens if I use a 32-bit?. What problems might I have?. It's a little question more, sorry.
 
Old 12-04-2011, 08:39 PM   #5
mchenier
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No problem at all.
 
Old 12-04-2011, 08:45 PM   #6
jhwilliams
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Well for one, you won't be able to run 64-bit binaries, which are quite common.

But equally or more importantly, you'll probably be missing some memory. The situation will only get worse if you decided to add more memory. That is, unless you install a PAE (Physical Address Extension) kernel. But I wouldn't bother with all of this.
 
Old 12-04-2011, 08:52 PM   #7
ralv
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It seems that I use 64-bit Debian. Now I know the risks of using an i386 machine that can work with AMD 64, thank you very much for your responses have helped me a lot.
 
Old 12-04-2011, 09:01 PM   #8
sundialsvcs
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64-bit processors are "32-bit capable," but not vice-versa. The processor-type selection (within a generic family such as this one) basically comes into play in two ways:
  1. Ability to exploit certain CPU-specific instructions that may exist.
  2. The size and structure of the virtual-memory control tables, necessary to access "more" memory if you have it available, but useless if you know that you never will.

The best move is simply to choose the selection that most-appropriately describes the actual chip.
 
Old 12-04-2011, 09:03 PM   #9
jhwilliams
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ralv View Post
It seems that I use 64-bit Debian.
As a Debian fan-boi, I am required to say that I think this is a very excellent and sensible selection of a distro. :-)
 
Old 12-04-2011, 09:23 PM   #10
ralv
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Thanks for the explanation, I think my laptop can work with 64-bits. For the type of processor used. Again thank you very much for the explanation.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sundialsvcs View Post
64-bit processors are "32-bit capable," but not vice-versa. The processor-type selection (within a generic family such as this one) basically comes into play in two ways:
  1. Ability to exploit certain CPU-specific instructions that may exist.
  2. The size and structure of the virtual-memory control tables, necessary to access "more" memory if you have it available, but useless if you know that you never will.

The best move is simply to choose the selection that most-appropriately describes the actual chip.
 
Old 12-04-2011, 09:26 PM   #11
ralv
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The truth is I have very little experience with Linux, but I also think Debian is the best option. :-D

Quote:
Originally Posted by jhwilliams View Post
As a Debian fan-boi, I am required to say that I think this is a very excellent and sensible selection of a distro. :-)
 
Old 12-05-2011, 12:08 PM   #12
suicidaleggroll
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As nearly every computer made/built in the last year or two (ignoring netbooks and some laptops) has 4GB or more of RAM, there's really very little reason to be installing any 32-bit Linux OS in this day and age, unless specifically required for some reason. The incompatibility problems from 15 years ago are all but gone, just about any problem you run into these days can be solved by installing the 32-bit version of the required libraries in addition to the 64-bit version, which takes no more than a minute.

64-bit Linux is nice and stable, and has been used regularly on normal machines for the better part of a decade. It's nothing like 64-bit Windows, which didn't go mainstream until maybe 2009, if not later, and even in 2011 still has some significant incompatibility problems.

Last edited by suicidaleggroll; 12-05-2011 at 12:11 PM.
 
  


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