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Old 09-09-2004, 02:07 PM   #1
jlassiter
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Install apps as root or user ?


If I install an application while logged on as USER, can I use that application while logged on as root ?
 
Old 09-09-2004, 02:16 PM   #2
hitesh_linux
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If you have given proper permissions to user, he can able to install applications.

Ofcourse 'root' user is Administrator of the system. By defults all premissiona are assign to root user.

I hope I have clear your concept..

--Hitesh
 
Old 09-09-2004, 02:19 PM   #3
macondo
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"If I install an application while logged on as USER,"

you can only install apps as ROOT.

#apt-get install <name of app>

Read the APT-HOWTO
debian.org > documentation > manuals > APT-HOWTO

This will save a lot of headaches. :

Of course, you can use these apps as USER.

to avoid problems when starting from the terminal, you can do this:

#export XAUTHORITY=/home/your_user_name/.Xauthority


Last edited by macondo; 09-09-2004 at 02:26 PM.
 
Old 09-09-2004, 02:24 PM   #4
jlassiter
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Thanks.

I thought I had installed some apps as USER. Maybe I had to SU and just forgot.

Anyway, I have Firefox on my USER desktop, but don't know how to make it available to me when I'm logged in as root.
 
Old 09-09-2004, 02:26 PM   #5
scuzzman
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Installing Firefox is as simple as unttarring it, so I don't doubt you installed it as a user.

Quote:
Anyway, I have Firefox on my USER desktop, but don't know how to make it available to me when I'm logged in as root.
Why are you running a GUI as root?
 
Old 09-09-2004, 02:30 PM   #6
macondo
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"Anyway, I have Firefox on my USER desktop, but don't know how to make it available to me when I'm logged in as root."

Regardless what DE or WM you are using you will have a Debian menu.

Apps > Net > Mozilla-Firefox

later on, you can create an icon for it, or a keybinding.

Last edited by macondo; 09-09-2004 at 02:34 PM.
 
Old 09-09-2004, 02:53 PM   #7
jlassiter
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Why are you running a GUI as root?

scuzzman asks: Why are you running a GUI as root?

For the same reason I use a GUI as USER, I find it easier.

Should I not use a GUI as root ? If not, why ?

Thanks
 
Old 09-09-2004, 02:59 PM   #8
jlassiter
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macondo writes : Regardless what DE or WM you are using you will have a Debian menu.

I suppose WM is window manager, but what is DE ?
 
Old 09-09-2004, 08:35 PM   #9
macondo
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DE = Desktop Environment (GNOME, KDE)

Click on 'Tutorials' at the top of the page, and read the article 'Debian Configuration Post-Install', it will answer most of your questions.

Also read this article eventhough you already installed Debian, you will learn a lot, and maybe clarify some points.

The Very Verbose Debian Installation Walkthrough
http://osnews.com/story.php?news_id=2016

Might as well hang around the Debian forum in this site, you'll pick up a lot tips.

DO NOT go in the internet as root, especially without a firewall, any mistakes you make as root will affect your system, at this point, as a newbie, you are a lost babe in the woods.

Last edited by macondo; 09-09-2004 at 08:50 PM.
 
Old 09-09-2004, 09:02 PM   #10
mikshaw
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Quote:
Originally posted by macondo
you can only install apps as ROOT.

#apt-get install <name of app>
Uhhhhh....maybe I'm misreading, but it sounds like you're saying that you can only install apps as root, which is false. apt-get and other precompiled package managers are not the only way to install applications.
A person could just as easily do "configure --prefix=$HOME/appname" and install as user into his own home directory.
I'm just saying this because it sounded like you were saying "you can't do that", when Linux is all about "you can do that".
 
Old 09-09-2004, 09:17 PM   #11
crane
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Re: Install apps as root or user ?

Quote:
Originally posted by jlassiter
If I install an application while logged on as USER, can I use that application while logged on as root ?

Yes you can.
I have installed apps as user before. This includes firefox, quake3 and other games. if installed as user the files will be in your home directory. If you log in as root, you you should be able to run anything. Not sure though, never tried logging in as root and running proggies.
 
Old 09-09-2004, 11:01 PM   #12
macondo
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not in debian with apt-get.
 
Old 09-10-2004, 09:06 AM   #13
jlassiter
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Root runs user apps

While logged in as root I was able to create a link to and run Firefox, which had been installed in user's home directory while logged in as user .

It seems that the tidiest organization results from installing all apps as root; then one or more users can be given access.

Apparently it would work as well to install an app in one user's home directory, then give other users access. But that would be ugly.

Thanks for all the replies.
 
Old 09-10-2004, 11:17 AM   #14
Linux24
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How you install software on Linux? That's a question that deserves a long answer.

There are several ways you can acquire software:

.RPM - Red Hat Package Manager - these are self-installing files that you can install either at the command line or by double clicking them on your desktop as icons in a GUI. When you double click the icon for an RPM file, Linux will bring up a window for you to enter the superuser password for installation as root. If you install using RPM on the command line - you will have to enter su first to install.

.BIN - These are not-yet-executable self-extractors. Usually you have to set them to executable by doing something like:

chmod +x file_name.bin

and then extract them by entering:

./file_name.bin

.RUN - Nvidia distributes their drivers in this file format. You have to run this file from a shell. So, first make sure it is executable, and then you type:

sh file_name.run

And it will kick off an installation routine. Warning: Nvidia drivers for NFORCE chipsets on motherboards can be installed from a console terminal in a GUI. The video card drivers must be installed from a raw command line. Exit out of the gui by going to superuser and typing INIT 3. Then log in as root, run the file, and then modify /etc/X11/XFREE86Config-4 replacing nv with nvidia and making sure Load="glx" is not commented out.

TAR.GZ or .TGZ - These are tarballs. Tar is used to build a single archive, and gzip is used to compress them. First step is to extract the contents:

tar xvfz file_name will extract the contents of the file to your current location. This will almost always be a directory of the same name that appears.

Or you can use the GUI to pull up File Roller or Ark, and simply drag and drop to the desktop. In KDE, you can right click on such a file and choose "extract here..."

Then enter the directory from a console and read all of the text files like README and INSTALL or INFO or whatever they are called which will give instructions on installation (hopefully).

The tarball may contain source code, in which case the first thing you do is type:

./configure

and hope it works. Fix any problems if it does not.

./make

and hope this works

su

to become the superuser and

./make install

to install the software

Then, to run it, you should be able to type the file name at the command line.

After installing software, I have often found there are no icons for it in KDE to click on to start it up. So, you end up having to make your own by going into your Linux distributions GUI control panel for Linux itself (not for KDE or Gnome) and finding the place where you edit the menu. Then enter the program name in the right spot, pick an icon, and it should work.

Sometimes, when you enter the program name at the command line, nothing will happen because the idiot programmer is an unfriendly (yet generous) sort who doesn't believe in making his software usable (or doesn't give a hoot). After you install, you can find your program by searching for it (it almost always installs in /usr with this command

find /usr -name '*part_of_file_name*'

Once you find where the program itself lives, you need to make a link to it in one of the directories inside another directory that is in your PATH.

The search PATH is where Linux looks for executables to live, and it is defined as an environment variable loaded from one of those nasty configuration files on boot. You can either add the directory to your path, or put a symlink somewhere in a directory already defined in the path. I prefer a symlink, because if you delete the installed software, the link dies too. Use this command to make the link

ln -s target_file_name_and_path link_name

Example:

ln -s /usr/games/larry /usr/bin/larry

From that point forward, typing larry at the command line will launch larry. Then you can go back and make icons.

It's not all clean and neat like Windows, where developers pretty much always use install shield to package software, and it drops in files, edits all OS configurations, logs the installation path taken, creates an uninstall routine, cleans up all temporary files, and then neatly drops icons on the desktop and in your menu.

That's because with Linux, you might not have a menu. You might be running flux instead of KDE or Gnome - or Windowmaker. The developer doesn't know, and he can either try to account for everything, or leave it to you to figure the rest out. Many choose the latter path.

While windows installation is more consistent and easier (for me anyway), I find the Linux route more trustworthy in that if there were any spyware or adware being loaded with the software, I would see it in the source or in the tarball before it went in.

I prefer RPM to Windows installation because RPM's if you uninstall them, truly uninstall and go away, whereas with Windows installation, if you try to uninstall something, it will refuse to delete your saved games, anything currently in use by anything, any spyware it leaves behind, and any registry keys it created dynamically - because Windows developers do a bad job of logging the reg keys that their software will create during use and making sure uninstall gets them all. Even nvidia drivers, upon uninstallation from windows, will leave 20 keys behind in the Windows registry.

With linux, you do a find on the file name, and you blow away the directories, and the stuff is gone. If it was an RPM, uninstall using the gui or RPM, and it is *gone*.

Good luck to you. More details are available out on the web everywhere.
 
  


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