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Old 03-27-2007, 12:02 AM   #1
Smitty67
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Registered: Mar 2007
Location: Southeast
Distribution: Slackware, Ubuntu
Posts: 17

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In over my head with slackware??


Hello all,

I am new to linux and after trying Ubuntu and finding it to be a little too much like the thing I am trying to escape, I have decided to jump into the deep-end with Slackware. So far I have partitioned my disk and installed Slackware to the point where I can actually get online and explore the OS. I am having issues with sound and wireless networking, as well as external USB storage. But these are all things that I am willing to tackle at my leisure (because I like a challenge...or because I'm a glutton for punishment). I would however like to know more about the basics of linux. For example, how to install programs on Slackware (since there are no ".exe's") and when programs are installed, are the program files automatically stored in a system folder, making it ok to delete the folder in which they were installed from? If some one could help me with this basic question and/or refer me to a book or website that will help me learn how to use slackware like a pro. Any info is greatly appreciated.
 
Old 03-27-2007, 12:20 AM   #2
budword
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Registered: Apr 2003
Location: Wisconsin
Distribution: Switched to regualr Ubuntu, because I don't like KDE4, at all. Looks like vista on crack.....
Posts: 675

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This might help a bit....

http://www.slackersbible.org/

Good luck...

David

P.S. You might want to try fluxbuntu. All the ease and help of the ubuntu community, and a simple system that flys even on older hardware, with the best hardware detection in the linux world. I found a fantastic collection of howto's for ubuntu, let me know if you might be interested in it.

Last edited by budword; 03-27-2007 at 12:23 AM.
 
Old 03-27-2007, 01:50 AM   #3
Electro
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Registered: Jan 2002
Posts: 6,042

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Its not folder, its directory.

There are no EXE files in Linux. All files secured and noted as executed through permissions. A file can have read, write, and execute permissions for either user, group, or other (everyone). Also they can have sticky permissions that complicates the security of files.

There is no doubt there that Slackware will challenge you. I suggest start something simple like Ubuntu to learn Linux here and there. Then come back and learn Slackware or even better Gentoo. IMHO, Gentoo is easier configuring, compiling, and installing programs because it uses an open source utility named emerge to automate the process.

Setting up sound is easier than you think. Go to alsa-project.org and browse for your sound card. Sure running alsaconf can help, but I found it can mess up /etc/modprobe.conf or /etc/modules.conf. After you got the correct modules (drivers) for your sound card, use alsamixer to adjust the volume. Then run alsactl store as root to keep them as defaults next time you reboot.

Wireless NIC can be hard or easy depending what chip it is based on. If its Atheros based, its easy. If it is not, Google is your friend to find what modules or a NDIS wrapper is right for your card. I strongly recommend using wired NIC because it is easy, reliable, secure. IMHO, wireless PCI NIC are worthless because you have to place the computer in weird spots through out the day. Also they are not reliable and they can screw up other components in the computer because they emit out very high energy pulses that causes EMI (Electromagnetic Interference). For games wireless NIC produces higher latency than wired NIC.

What is not said at http://www.slackersbible.org/?q=node/77 about /sys. /sys is a virtual filesystem that is similar to /proc, but it includes a lot more information and a desire module option can be changed on the fly. Also it provides up to date device changes when a USB, IEEE-1394 (aka Firewire or i.Link), SCSI, and SATA is inserted or removed. The directory /proc is procfs and /sys is sysfs.

Linux or Unix is an mult-tasking and virtual memory operating system.
 
Old 03-27-2007, 07:45 AM   #4
SML
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Registered: Dec 2002
Location: US
Distribution: Intel Clear Linux
Posts: 381

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Electro,
I wonder if our newbie understands your post?
 
Old 03-27-2007, 08:50 AM   #5
titopoquito
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Registered: Jul 2004
Location: Lower Rhine region, Germany
Distribution: Slackware 14.1 (32 and 64 bit)
Posts: 1,594

Rep: Reputation: 124Reputation: 124
The revised Slackware Book: http://slackbook.org/
RUTE Linux Tutorial: http://rute.2038bug.com/index.html.gz

Compiling Software from Source: http://www.linuxquestions.org/linux/...ms_from_Source
 
Old 03-27-2007, 06:39 PM   #6
Electro
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Registered: Jan 2002
Posts: 6,042

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Quote:
Originally Posted by SML
Electro,
I wonder if our newbie understands your post?
Just need to chew it. Not take it in all at once.
 
Old 03-27-2007, 09:10 PM   #7
jeenam
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Registered: Dec 2006
Distribution: Slackware 11
Posts: 144

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Start with this: http://www.tldp.org/LDP/intro-linux/...tro-linux.html

Slackware is a bear for someone with very little linux knowledge.
 
Old 03-28-2007, 02:24 AM   #8
MS3FGX
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Registered: Jan 2004
Location: NJ, USA
Distribution: Slackware, Debian
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Slackware was the first Linux distribution I tried, and I didn't really have too much trouble adapting. As long as you are wiling and able to do the research and troubleshoot any problems, you can master anything.
 
Old 03-28-2007, 08:04 AM   #9
SML
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Registered: Dec 2002
Location: US
Distribution: Intel Clear Linux
Posts: 381

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I dont think slackware is too bad for newbies.

Looking back, I actually learnt the most linux knowledge from Arch which all seemed to hang together with more logic than other distros.

However if our original poster cannot google for a slack guide, then I think he could be in for a difficult struggle.
 
Old 03-28-2007, 08:56 AM   #10
Smitty67
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Registered: Mar 2007
Location: Southeast
Distribution: Slackware, Ubuntu
Posts: 17

Original Poster
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Thank you all for your valuable input, and yes I do understand Electro's post...most of it anyway. While I am a linux 'newbie', I did learn about computing by using the later versions of MS-DOS (5.x and up) and by using "pine" as my first means of sending email and by navigating an internet that didnt even have a single graphic on it. Also I do use linux and unix at work as part of my job is to set up huge Linux/Unix Databases. Sadly my role is limited to configuring RAID Conrolers, Tape drives, SCSI Controllers etc. In short,command lines don't scare me and the logic is there, I just don't understand the "language" as it were. Thanks again guys (and girls if it applies).
 
Old 03-28-2007, 06:42 PM   #11
masonm
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2003
Location: Following the white rabbit
Distribution: Slackware64 14.2 Solus
Posts: 2,264

Rep: Reputation: 51
Slack was my first distro and while the learning curve can be a tad steep it's well worth it. Sound problems are as simple as running alsaconf and making sure your user is in the audio group.

Once you install software, yes it's fine to delete the directory from which you installed it.
 
Old 03-29-2007, 10:31 AM   #12
apolinsky
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Registered: Oct 2004
Location: Brooklyn
Distribution: Slackware 14.1, 14.2; Debian Jessie; Centos 6; FreeBSD 9 & 10
Posts: 275

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Slackware takes a bit of time to get used to. It is straight forward in its approach, though diverges from placement of directory structure. It follows the lead of BSD in that initialization of the system is in /etc/rc.d, as opposed to the system V structure of /etc/rc.d/rcX.d where the 'X' is replaced by the 'run level' (1 - 5). It was my first distribution (Slackware 2.2) and I continue with it to this day, though not as up to date as many people (Slackware 10 and 10.1). I tend to use Centos to mimic the Redhat environment we have at work.

Good luck. I'm sure you'll learn a lot with Slackware.
 
  


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