LinuxQuestions.org
LinuxAnswers - the LQ Linux tutorial section.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices



Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 03-12-2009, 01:29 PM   #1
lse123
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2008
Posts: 72

Rep: Reputation: 15
In a 64bit PC may make 4 partitions vista 32bit, vista 64bit, and ...


If I buy a 64bit PC MACHINE, X86 WINDOWS, CAN I :

Make 4 partitions, the below
VISTA 32BIT
VISTA 64BIT
Kubuntu 9.04 64bit full dvd version [when ready]
Kubuntu 9.04 32bit full dvd version [when ready] ????
 
Old 03-12-2009, 01:43 PM   #2
johnsfine
Guru
 
Registered: Dec 2007
Distribution: Centos
Posts: 5,139

Rep: Reputation: 1127Reputation: 1127Reputation: 1127Reputation: 1127Reputation: 1127Reputation: 1127Reputation: 1127Reputation: 1127Reputation: 1127
Why would you want to dual boot 32bit Vista with 64bit Vista? How are you buying Vista? One copy of Vista is usually bundled when you buy a new computer, but the second copy is likely to cost a lot.

You can usually pay just a little extra to have 64bit Vista bundled instead of 32bit. If you have 64bit Vista, I can't imagine why you would also want 32bit Vista.

I don't know much about multi-boot with more than one copy of Vista. I'm pretty sure you can do it, but I don't know the details. I'm mainly wondering why you might want to.

As for the rest of what you want to do: No problem, but you'll likely want more than four partitions.

With Linux, there is slightly more reason (than for Vista) to want both a 32bit and 64bit install. There still isn't much reason. Mainly there is a lot less cost ($, complexity, time, disk space, etc.) to having both in Linux than having both in Windows. So in Linux if you think you want both, why not.

You can have up to three primary partitions plus many logical partitions (all the logical partitions go inside one extended partition). I've read that Windows will only install to a primary partition. Linux doesn't care whether its partitions are primary or logical.

You'll probably want a swap partition to be shared by the two Linux installs. You might want another shared partition for data. You might want each of the Linux installs to have its home partition separate from its / partition. There are lots of choices.

Most Linux distributions use a boot manager called Grub. When you install Windows first and then Linux, it is very easy to configure Grub to give you the choice of which to boot (of however many of each you have installed). It's a bit more complicated to set up when you install Linux before Windows, but that also can be made to work. It is also possible, but harder, to use the Windows boot code as the primary bootstrap and have it display a menu with choices to transfer boot control to other partitions.

Last edited by johnsfine; 03-12-2009 at 01:50 PM.
 
Old 03-14-2009, 09:56 AM   #3
powerk24
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Mar 2009
Posts: 1

Rep: Reputation: 0
Unhappy

Well, first of all, as we all know, Windows 64-bit is not compatible with all hardware and software, and much of it can run on 32-bit systems. The theory is, if you can create a 32-bit partition on a 64-bit system, and dual boot, you should be able to run all software. But, I don't know for sure if it works, nor do I know how to do so. Sorry I couldn't help out more
 
Old 03-14-2009, 10:09 AM   #4
johnsfine
Guru
 
Registered: Dec 2007
Distribution: Centos
Posts: 5,139

Rep: Reputation: 1127Reputation: 1127Reputation: 1127Reputation: 1127Reputation: 1127Reputation: 1127Reputation: 1127Reputation: 1127Reputation: 1127
Quote:
Originally Posted by powerk24 View Post
Windows 64-bit is not compatible with all hardware and software
What software do you mean? I don't know of any software that runs on 32bit Vista but not on 64bit Vista.

I assumed the OP intended to buy a PC with 64bit Vista bundled. That tends to eliminate the possibility of hardware that doesn't have drivers for 64bit Vista.

Having bought a PC with 64bit Vista bundled, you might well want to install Linux as well. But I can't see why you might want add 32bit Vista.

If you do find software that runs on 32bit Vista but not on 64bit Vista, the problem is probably registry access by two different methods, one of which inserts the "wow64" stuff and one of which doesn't (so the program can't find its own registry entries). It takes a pretty questionable mix of 32 bit and 64 bit parts in a program to get that effect, so you might find it in some freeware project's attempt to get 64 bit support when they have no 64 bit system to test on, but you shouldn't see it in any pure 32 bit code nor in any commercial product. If you hit that problem, the work around is a lot simpler than dual booting, so you still have no reason to add Vista32.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
fedora/vista dual boot - partimage: restored vista - vista won't let me log on redmoon zero Linux - General 1 12-31-2007 08:21 PM
32bit(i386) or 64bit(amd64) on an amd 64bit cpu (amd 6000+)? d-_-b Debian 7 10-28-2007 08:48 PM
can 64bit processor run both 64bit and 32bit computers? DJOtaku Linux - General 4 09-08-2005 09:14 PM
32bit on 64bit paralysis Linux From Scratch 2 06-02-2005 04:19 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:24 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration