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Old 05-03-2009, 02:49 PM   #1
Lola Kews
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I would like to try a different Linux, but ?


I have a 2 hard drive system. I run SUSE 10.3 (absolutely awesome) and SUSE 11.0 (Not so awesome).

Question: I would like to try Debian or another distro that is user friendly as SUSE 10.3 but don't know anything about the other linux versions and am open to suggestions.

One requirement is I would like to be able to totally delete it from my system without disrupting the other two Linux setups if I decide I don't like it, is this possible?
 
Old 05-03-2009, 02:55 PM   #2
paulsm4
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Strong suggestion:
1. Familiarize yourself with "virtualization software" like VMWare or VBox (among many others)

2. It's fun, easy (and eminently practical) to run as many or as few OS's as you want in a virtual environment. You just need a decent CPU, lots of RAM, and even more disk (all three of which, fortunately, are more or less commodities these days).

IMHO .. PSM

PS:
I've used different versions of SuSE since version 8.x ... and I completely agree with you about OpenSuSE 11.x. Personally, I think SimplyMempis currently fills that niche that SuSE used to. Again, IMHO..
 
Old 05-03-2009, 03:35 PM   #3
Lola Kews
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paulsm4 View Post
Strong suggestion:
1. Familiarize yourself with "virtualization software" like VMWare or VBox (among many others)

2. It's fun, easy (and eminently practical) to run as many or as few OS's as you want in a virtual environment. You just need a decent CPU, lots of RAM, and even more disk (all three of which, fortunately, are more or less commodities these days).

IMHO .. PSM

PS:
I've used different versions of SuSE since version 8.x ... and I completely agree with you about OpenSuSE 11.x. Personally, I think SimplyMempis currently fills that niche that SuSE used to. Again, IMHO..

Thanks for the reply. I went to the review site and looked at the different distros. It seems all had some issues except one called "Slackware". Everyone gave it a "10"!

Is this a guru type distro or can a somewhat new person get along with it. I don't particularly want a heavy learning curve.
For a distro to get such heavy positive acceptance it must have a lot going for it or is there something I'm missing?
 
Old 05-03-2009, 03:42 PM   #4
linus72
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Of course, I say go multidistro and pick the one you feel is easiest for you to master.
Ubuntu 8.04 is a great place to start.
 
Old 05-03-2009, 03:43 PM   #5
10speed705
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I have never used it my self but if you were thinking Debian I am with you on that. I am a Debian junkie started on it and now run many different servers on it. also Ubuntu is based off Debian and is a bit more friendly.
 
Old 05-03-2009, 03:54 PM   #6
Tinkster
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lola Kews View Post
Thanks for the reply. I went to the review site and looked at the different distros. It seems all had some issues except one called "Slackware". Everyone gave it a "10"!
Heh. I'd give slack a 10, too, any day. What site did
you find that rating on?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Lola Kews View Post
Is this a guru type distro or can a somewhat new person get along with it. I don't particularly want a heavy learning curve.
For a distro to get such heavy positive acceptance it must have a lot going for it or is there something I'm missing?
Hmmm. Slackware won't hold your hand, doesn't come with a
fancy package manager, doesn't have a large package selection
(community sites with package repositories do exist though) and
won't hold your hand with any configuration tasks than the
most basic stuff during installation (e.g. lilo setup, time
zones and networking). It doesn't modify source packages to
accommodate Pat's views of things (so your KDE will be as the
KDE guys have it by default, seamonkey will be seamonkey not
iceape, ... ) ... it follows the KISS principle to the extreme;
that means it sticks to as simple as possible scripts and
configurations - if you like that, slack is a good choice.
If hand-holding and detail-hiding is your thing, go *buntu.



Cheers,
Tink
 
Old 05-03-2009, 03:57 PM   #7
salasi
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Slackware is something of an acquired taste, a bit of a 'marmite', if you know what I mean; it takes something of 'its easier to do it yourself than have some misconceived automation get in your way'. If that's what you want, most other distros won't come close (save maybe gentoo/sabayon and LFS) but most people will be happier with a shallower learning curve.

On this laptop, I have openSuSE 11.1 and its not without issues. Some seem to be related to the fact that I did an update from 10.3, rather than a clean install, but, for me, this version of KDE 4 is not really ready for ordinary end users yet. (This will matter less to you if your favoured GUI isn't KDE.)

Select your GUI first, if you can; there is little point in selecting a distro that doesn't have your favourite GUI. Of course, I like having several available to me and that's one thing I like about SuSE; it does a good job on several GUIs. Some distros (Ubuntu, as an example) do a good job on one GUI, but others, if they are available, are not to the same level of polishedness.

Of course, you always install/build your own from sources, but that always seems like more faffing about than is necessary to me. And then, I'm sure, you'll spend ages fiddling with the GUI (themes, wallpapers) to make it a more civilised place to be.

Another things that I like SuSE for is the large repos; if you don't have that as a requirement, then you can away from the top few distros and consider smaller options (although some of the debian derivatives seem to offer a kind of best of both worlds, in that they do a good job of customising the basic system and then allow you to use packages from the large debian repos).
 
Old 05-03-2009, 04:19 PM   #8
Lola Kews
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A lot of interesting responses. Right now I have both SUSE 10.3 and 11.0 on my computer and find myself continually going to 10.3 because it is so darn reliable and reasonably fast, but no more security updates.

I know I want to try something else just not sure what at this point.

One question no one answered, can you delete a distro if you don't want it any longer without screwing up the other distros on hard drives?

Oh, I think it was Tinkster that wanted to know where I read the reviews, why here of course.


Salasi, I like KDE.
As for being fully automated, HA! I can't even find a way to change the time in SUSE 11.1, using the settings (right click) doesn't work correctly.

Last edited by Lola Kews; 05-03-2009 at 04:30 PM.
 
Old 05-03-2009, 04:20 PM   #9
synss
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tinkster View Post
Heh. I'd give slack a 10, too, any day. What site did
you find that rating on?
My guess is that he found the reviews on this very site called linuxquestion.org

And yes, slackware is a guru-style distro.

Last edited by synss; 05-03-2009 at 04:23 PM. Reason: Added link
 
Old 05-03-2009, 05:11 PM   #10
paulsm4
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Lola Kews -

"Virtualization software" let you try out different OS's *without having to install anything* on your "real PC". Please read this link for a brief intro:

http://www.linux.com/feature/133018

Another possibility: many distros offer a "live CD": you boot that distro from a CD/DVD (avoiding the need to install locally, or multi-boot). Then, if you like, you can do a hard-disk install of the distro you prefer.

Both alternatives - virtualization, and live CD's - make it easy to try different distros without installing anything (and without having to de-install anything).

'Hope that helps .. PSM

PS:
If you've installed multiple distros in a multi-boot configuration, typically each distro will own its own partitions. "Deleting the distro" is simply deleting that entry from your boot menu (grub or lilo), then deleting the corresponding partitions. It should *not* affect the distros you've left installed.

Last edited by paulsm4; 05-03-2009 at 06:02 PM.
 
Old 05-04-2009, 12:37 PM   #11
Lola Kews
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A lot of good advise, I'll look into things a little deeper and in all probability be back with more questions.

Thank you.
 
  


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