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Old 11-18-2008, 04:22 AM   #31
baig
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First and the foremost difference b/w both OS's is Linux is Linux and Windows is Windows:-). Secondly Linux is Unix based operating system and Windows is not.. The basic Philosophies of both plate forms are opposite..

Linux: Distribute source code and make it better and the best, because more genius people are out there to contribute..

Windows: Hide every bit of code and make $'s of every single line..:-)
 
Old 11-18-2008, 04:35 AM   #32
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I would say that from the point of view of the stereotypical average user just starting with computing, that Windows and GNU/Linux present an equal learning curve. For those with many years experience of Windows and who are set in their ways and unwilling to ditch preconceived ideas, GNU/Linux will be hard. I only had a couple of years or so with Windows before I latched on to GNU/Linux, so I have little difficulty adjusting. To me, GNU/Linux is much more interesting, there's so much more you can learn - depending on how deep you want to go. With Windows, more or less, only the shallow end is available.
 
Old 11-18-2008, 07:13 AM   #33
H_TeXMeX_H
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ErV View Post
Come on, aren't you sick of metaphors like this one yet? Remove microsoft - and you'll get Apple. And if you'll get Apple instead of Microsoft, I bet you'll want Microsoft back. All this isn't about "\"evil empires\" vs \"freedom\"".Install windows - you'll get one kind of problems. Install linux - you'll another kind of problems. You only decide which kind of problems you want. There is no need to iconize Linux or demonize microsoft - it's just wrong kind of thing for that.
Read the EULA carefully and you will believe ...
 
Old 11-18-2008, 07:30 AM   #34
needcoffee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brianL View Post
I would say that from the point of view of the stereotypical average user just starting with computing, that Windows and GNU/Linux present an equal learning curve.
I would definately dispute that, windows is "windows" and a few programs likes Word, Excel, IE. on the other hand Linux (the platform) is a zillion different distros with the choice of a zillion different GUI's and a zillion zillion different applications. ergo "windows" (the platform) is easier to learn. Plus windows holds your hand with "user-friendly" (i.e. noob friendly) interaces where as Linux, generally speaking, is about as noob friendly as... I don't know.. an anti-noob landmine - or something.

Quote:
Originally Posted by brianL View Post
To me, GNU/Linux is much more interesting, there's so much more you can learn - depending on how deep you want to go. With Windows, more or less, only the shallow end is available.
I think it is more appropriate (in the context of noobs) to say that with windows, more or less, only the shallow end is neccessary.

Last edited by needcoffee; 11-18-2008 at 07:31 AM.
 
Old 11-18-2008, 08:51 AM   #35
AceofSpades19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by needcoffee View Post
I would definately dispute that, windows is "windows" and a few programs likes Word, Excel, IE. on the other hand Linux (the platform) is a zillion different distros with the choice of a zillion different GUI's and a zillion zillion different applications. ergo "windows" (the platform) is easier to learn. Plus windows holds your hand with "user-friendly" (i.e. noob friendly) interaces where as Linux, generally speaking, is about as noob friendly as... I don't know.. an anti-noob landmine - or something.
So I guess windows holds your hand when you have to edit the registry?, or how about when you go to install it with the text based interface?, windows does not hold your hand more then ubuntu does. Not to mention, just because linux has a lot more choice does not mean its harder to learn because most people just use the most popular distro(ubuntu right now) and they just use the apps that go with it, so no, unless ubuntu installs a "zillion zillion applications", they don't usually have to chose.
 
Old 11-18-2008, 09:36 AM   #36
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Here's an example of noob-friendliness:

I equipped two clueless noobs (computer noobs, not just Linux noobs) with notebooks and Ubuntu pre-installed. They seem to get along with it just fine. And now they have bought HP all-in-one printers.

They looked at the CD and the installation instructions and turned to me. It was so much Chinese to them: install this first, plug in printer, turn printer on, continue to install that, get a shitload of software you don't need, provide an internet conenction to download yet more software you don't need, yadda yadda.

I told them just to plug the printers in and switch them on. Ubuntu took care of the rest. So much for noob-friendliness in Windows.

Robin
 
Old 11-18-2008, 10:32 AM   #37
onebuck
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Hi,

M$ Windows is a tool. GNU/Linux is a tool. Just like Proto, Snapon or Craftsman are tools. Some prefer one over the other.

Some get the job done better as far as the 'USER' is concerned. If my lively hood depended on the tool then I would not be using Craftsman but Snapon which does have a better feel but expensive. Just like a OS, some people are forced to use M$ by their employers/clients.

That's the way it is. Sure GNU/Linux is better and is getting more acceptance then ever before. The in-fighting doesn't help that much with everyone tearing things down. The 'OS' is a 'TOOL' not a religion. If you think otherwise then fine but let it rest since we have enough zealots in this world today.

My opinion is that I really think this thread is getting out of hand and this debate has been hammered to death so many times in the past. It should be moved to 'General'.
 
Old 11-18-2008, 11:46 AM   #38
ErV
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Quote:
Originally Posted by H_TeXMeX_H View Post
Read the EULA carefully and you will believe ...
I did read it. You have choice whether to accept it or not. They offer you OS on their conditions. If you don't like conditions, you won't get OS. Pretty easy, and choice is yours.
 
Old 11-18-2008, 12:52 PM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ErV View Post
I did read it. You have choice whether to accept it or not. They offer you OS on their conditions. If you don't like conditions, you won't get OS. Pretty easy, and choice is yours.
Right ... except you have to click next.
 
Old 11-18-2008, 02:02 PM   #40
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Well, sandypeter111, you seem to have stirred things up a bit.

Let me see if I can give you any information that will help you. I am very new to Linux and come from Windows.

There are a lot of differences, as there is between either of them and a Mac system.

Two things that you need to consider is what you do with your computer, and what hardware you have. I do not play any games at all so the compatability with games is not a concern, it may be with you. Most computers are made for and sold with an OS.

The reason that you have problems getting games and hardware to work on Linux is that both are made to run on Windows or Mac or both. More companies are considering Linux when developing hardware and programs all the time. The developers of Linux and its' many "flavors" also do a great job of making these things work under Linux.

We bought a new computer (Dell XPX420 240gig quad CPU 3gig ram) with Vista Home Premium. Both my wife and I thought it was about all we could stand and decided to migrate completely away from MS products. This is a very nice box but the winmodem (yes we are in a remote area and use dialup) wasn't much good on Vista and would cost money to get to be that good under Ubuntu (the Linux flavor we use). I replaced it with a hardware modem, works great, took a little work. Our old HP printer would not work under Linux (one of the few HP printers that won't, lucky us). Got a different HP, works as well or better than under Vista.

You need to check your hardware. A live CD of a distro can help with this.

If you are going to get a new computer, go somewhere that is familiar with Linux and get one that has the right hardware in the first place and you should have little or no problems.

I could rant about why you should flee Windows but you must realize that or you wouldn't be here. There is a learning curve. there was the first time you used Windows and would be if you switched to Mac. I think it is fun.

I did dual boot Ubuntu 8.04.1 with Ubuntu 8.04.1 so that we can use one and I can "play" with the other.

I would also recommend the last, not the newest stable release of any Linux flavor. The bugs are worked out.

Go for it and have fun.
 
Old 11-18-2008, 05:49 PM   #41
needcoffee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AceofSpades19 View Post
So I guess windows holds your hand when you have to edit the registry?, or how about when you go to install it with the text based interface?,
99% of windows users (if not more, much more) will never do either of those things nor ever need to.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AceofSpades19 View Post
windows does not hold your hand more then ubuntu does. Not to mention, just because linux has a lot more choice does not mean its harder to learn because most people just use the most popular distro(ubuntu right now) and they just use the apps that go with it, so no, unless ubuntu installs a "zillion zillion applications", they don't usually have to chose.
But to learn a "Platform" is a different concept. if someone "learns" windows, they will be familiar with the windows GUI and the Microsoft apps - take them to any other windows PC, anywhere in the world and their learned skills (for that platform) are still precisely relevant. My point is that just finding two linux based systems that have the same distro/gui/apps would be a minor miracle.

Quote:
Here's an example of noob-friendliness:

I equipped two clueless noobs (computer noobs, not just Linux noobs) with notebooks and Ubuntu pre-installed. They seem to get along with it just fine. And now they have bought HP all-in-one printers.

They looked at the CD and the installation instructions and turned to me. It was so much Chinese to them: install this first, plug in printer, turn printer on, continue to install that, get a shitload of software you don't need, provide an internet conenction to download yet more software you don't need, yadda yadda.

I told them just to plug the printers in and switch them on. Ubuntu took care of the rest. So much for noob-friendliness in Windows.
That's all very well but what if the printer driver isn't in linux or if printing just isn't setup full stop? then those noobs are in a world of hurt, where as with windows all they have to do is put the cd in the drive (it will auto load) then click in the "install driver" option from the menu. not to mention many printers will just plug and play in windows anyway.


Personally I view linux as a hobby rather than a practical solution (for a simple desktop user), one thing I would never to is give a linux install to a non techie person.

Last edited by needcoffee; 11-18-2008 at 05:59 PM.
 
Old 11-18-2008, 06:15 PM   #42
AceofSpades19
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Originally Posted by needcoffee View Post
99% of windows users (if not more, much more) will never do either of those things nor ever need to.



But to learn a "Platform" is a different concept. if someone "learns" windows, they will be familiar with the windows GUI and the Microsoft apps - take them to any other windows PC, anywhere in the world and their learned skills (for that platform) are still precisely relevant. My point is that just finding two linux based systems that have the same distro/gui/apps would be a minor miracle.
I don't know about you, but I find most people generally use the same apps. Most people either use gnome or kde and for office most people use Openoffice. Its far from a miracle to find the same distro/qui/apps. Generally, the only people that run obscure stuff are the people that know what they are doing, eg. people that know what they are doing would use latex instead of OpenOffice.org Writer.

Quote:
That's all very well but what if the printer driver isn't in linux or if printing just isn't setup full stop? then those noobs are in a world of hurt, where as with windows all they have to do is put the cd in the drive (it will auto load) then click in the "install driver" option from the menu. not to mention many printers will just plug and play in windows anyway.
Most printers will plug and play in linux too. Windows drivers don't always work that way. Look at people upgrading to windows vista, and all of sudden their printers don't work and they are in "a world of hurt". If the "noobs" use a "noob" oriented distro like ubuntu, it usually installs a driver for their printer for them if one exists, which it does 95% of the time.
Quote:
Personally I view linux as a hobby rather than a practical solution (for a simple desktop user), one thing I would never to is give a linux install to a non techie person.
Actually, people that have used windows for a long time will have a harder time switching then someone who hasn't. a windows "Power User" will find linux very confusing but someone who hasn't got used to the "windowsisms" they will not find it any more confusing then switching from windows 2k to xp because they haven't got used to it yet and they don't know what they are doing anyways, so it doesn't really matter what os they use, they will still get confused.
 
  


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