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Old 03-06-2008, 03:25 AM   #1
LeeeMcLeod
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I need a spot of help


ok.. i've never dealt with Linux before.. but i have really been wanting to..
the deal is..
i have this older computer that is serving no purpose... i cant hook it up to the internet because i cant get the network card driver installed..
and right now im not even sure that the computer even has an OS on it..
and basically i want to install Damn Small Linux on it..
i have no idea where to start no idea how to burn the ISO the right way
no idea how to get it on the computer if there is no OS on it already...
basically im completely lost and need a lot of help...
please help me!!
 
Old 03-06-2008, 04:01 AM   #2
acid_kewpie
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please use better thread titles. what was wrong with "how to burn a Damn Small Linux iso"? And if you'd googled that phrase too, the very first hit would have been.... http://damnsmalllinux.org/wiki/index..._a_Bootable_CD
 
Old 03-06-2008, 09:12 AM   #3
JamesHall
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Step by step

I presume you have a Windows PC with a decent internet connection.

1. Download the DSL iso image from one of the download mirrors listed on http://damnsmalllinux.org/download.html (you'll need to browse to the subdirectory 'current' and select the file 'dsl-4.2.5.iso') and save it.

2. Burn the iso image to a writeable CD using whatever CD burning software you've got on your Windows box. I have Roxio Creator Classic on mine, in which all you need to do is select 'File > Record disc from image', browse to the iso file and click OK. If you get stuck, use the application's Help facility and search for "iso", "image" or similar, hopefully there will be instructions in there somewhere.

3. Power up your old PC and get into the BIOS (this is usually done by hitting Del or F8 while it's booting), and make sure that the boot order settings specify that the CD-ROM should be used as the first boot device, with the hard disk as the second.

4. Pop the DSL disc into the drive and reboot the PC. I don't know anything about DSL, but normally an installation environment will boot from the disc, and a series of prompts will guide you through the installation.

At some point, the installer will probably ask you how you want to partition and format your hard disk. I presume from your initial post that if there already is an OS on the old disk, you don't want to keep it, so just select the option which utilises and formats the entire disk.

You will normally have the option to configure your network card during installation, assuming the installer can find it. Provided the card is a standard PCI card, DSL should find it easily, and then you can either configure it to use DHCP (if you've got a DHCP-serving device on your network) or with a static IP configuration.

The installer will ask you to specify a root password (sort of equivalent to the Windows Administrator password) and at least one 'normal' username and password.

If the installation program asks you any other questions and the answer isn't obvious, just accept the defaults.

That should do the job - DSL should install, and when it's finished you just pop the CD out, then log in with the 'normal' username and password that you entered during installation, and explore the wonderful world that is Linux

Please note that, as I said earlier, I have never used DSL, but I've installed and messed about with dozens of Linux distros and they all usually install in more or less the same way.

Good luck - let us know how it goes!
 
Old 03-06-2008, 06:00 PM   #4
LeeeMcLeod
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Unhappy

ok so i found out that one of the harddrives im using still has windows 98 on it.. and i burned the iso to a cd... and then when i put it in the computer with windows 98 it wont load anything... and i open the D drive and click on the file... and all it does is ask me what i want to use to open the file with... this is where i knew i'd have trouble... if i can figure out how to get past this.. i am pretty sure i can figure out the rest on my own
 
Old 03-06-2008, 06:05 PM   #5
Uncle_Theodore
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LeeeMcLeod View Post
ok so i found out that one of the harddrives im using still has windows 98 on it.. and i burned the iso to a cd... and then when i put it in the computer with windows 98 it wont load anything... and i open the D drive and click on the file... and all it does is ask me what i want to use to open the file with... this is where i knew i'd have trouble... if i can figure out how to get past this.. i am pretty sure i can figure out the rest on my own
If you burned a bootable CD, you should boot your computer from it for installing Linux. Check in the BIOS boot order that CD stands above the harddrive and then boot your computer.
 
Old 03-06-2008, 06:08 PM   #6
LeeeMcLeod
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle_Theodore View Post
If you burned a bootable CD, you should boot your computer from it for installing Linux. Check in the BIOS boot order that CD stands above the harddrive and then boot your computer.


it appears that the cd rom is the first boot device...
yet it still does nothing...
should i just give up hope?
 
Old 03-06-2008, 06:17 PM   #7
Uncle_Theodore
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LeeeMcLeod View Post
it appears that the cd rom is the first boot device...
yet it still does nothing...
should i just give up hope?
So, what happens when you put the CD in and reboot? Windows still comes up? Then, you might have burned your CD wrong.
 
Old 03-06-2008, 06:25 PM   #8
LeeeMcLeod
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle_Theodore View Post
So, what happens when you put the CD in and reboot? Windows still comes up? Then, you might have burned your CD wrong.
yes windows still comes up.. i was thinking maybe ill try and get the drivers for a flash drive onto this older computer...
i tried to burn it onto a cd.. but it wouldn't burn..
any ideas?? sorry to make so much trouble about this..
i usually do know what to do with computers... but right now im just clueless
 
Old 03-07-2008, 04:07 AM   #9
JamesHall
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OK - first off, opening the CD from within Win98 won't do anything, it doesn't work that way. If the computer is that old, then I wouldn't bother mucking about with Flash drives etc., so let's focus on getting the CD working.

1. Which CD burning application are you using? What commands / menu options are you using in the application to try to burn the CD?

2. When you say "it wouldn't burn", what do you mean? Did you get an error message from the CD burning application, and if so, what was it? Or did it appear to burn OK, but just isn't doing anything when you put it into the drive?

3. When you try to open the CD from within Win98, what do you see? Do you see a directory / file structure that you can browse, or do you see the iso file?

You need to make sure that you are actually creating a CD from the iso image, and not just copying the iso image to the disc as-is - there's a difference. If you Google for "burn iso images" plus the name of your application (e.g. "burn iso images Roxio") you'll find any number of pages explaining how to do it correctly. Also, if you're given the option in your CD burning application, you need to select 'Disc-at-once' instead of 'Track-at-once', and it's best to select the lowest available writing speed.

One other thing that you can do is to check the integrity of the iso image file itself. If you look in the directory from which you downloaded the dsl-4.2.5.iso file, you should see a file called dsl-4.2.5.iso.md5.txt. This file contains an MD5 checksum of the iso image. Download this file to your PC. Then go to http://www.md5summer.org/ and download the MD5summer application, which will run on your Windows PC. Use this application to generate an MD5 sum of your downloaded copy of the iso image file (it's pretty self-explanatory once you've installed the application), and compare the MD5 sum generated by the application to the one contained in dsl-4.2.5.iso.md5.txt. If they match, your image is OK. If not, your image is corrupt and you need to download it again.

Post back and let us know exactly what steps you've followed to try and create the boot CD, and maybe we can help further.

And absolutely do not give up hope - this is just the first of no doubt many interesting learning experiences that Linux will present you with, that's what makes it fun

Last edited by JamesHall; 03-07-2008 at 04:10 AM.
 
Old 03-07-2008, 05:40 AM   #10
brianL
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To burn your .iso to CD, try ImgBurn:

http://www.imgburn.com/

It's free, reliable, and easy to use.
 
Old 03-07-2008, 06:51 AM   #11
tredegar
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From post #4
Quote:
i open the D drive and click on the file... and all it does is ask me what i want to use to open the file with
so he has burnt the ISO image as a file
Please burn the file.iso as an ISO IMAGE. Just about all burning software has the option to do this, but you may have to look for it.
Make sure your BIOS is set to boot from your CD Rom first.
Reboot.
 
Old 03-07-2008, 07:18 AM   #12
andreas_skw
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don't forget you save config at BIOS
 
Old 03-07-2008, 03:08 PM   #13
LeeeMcLeod
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brianL View Post
To burn your .iso to CD, try ImgBurn:

http://www.imgburn.com/

It's free, reliable, and easy to use.
yeah ImgBurn did the trick.. thank you!!
 
  


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