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-   -   I have tried Ubuntu 8.04 64bit, it's too slow, which other linux distro should I try? (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-newbie-8/i-have-tried-ubuntu-8-04-64bit-its-too-slow-which-other-linux-distro-should-i-try-683630/)

P@trick99 11-15-2008 03:11 PM

I have tried Ubuntu 8.04 64bit, it's too slow, which other linux distro should I try?
 
I have tried Linux Ubuntu 8.04 64bit it is a good distro. I like the package manager, very good hardware support, everything works. Compiz Fusion is cool too. I had problem with flash payer (it's working now) and java (still not working)
The only thing I don't like is that Ubuntu is little bit slow and laggy.
I would like to try other Linux distro , which one ???
I would like to try a distro with good and easy installer/package manager
A distro which is solid and fast

Thank you


My laptop spec

Dell Vostro 1700
Intel Core 2 duo 2.2 GHz (T7500)
2x 160 Gb Hard Drive
Nvidia 8600 GT
Ram 3 GB



rickh 11-15-2008 03:17 PM

http://distrowatch.com/dwres.php?resource=major

Take your pick. They're all equally fast, including Ubuntu. It's not the distro, it's the configuration, and you kind of have to do that yourself. OTOH, default configuration setups are as different as hardware setups. Maybe you'll get lucky and the next default will be a bit more satisfactory. It's a pretty disorganized way to go about it, though. Better you should learn to configure the system you have.

dv502 11-15-2008 03:32 PM

Arch linux is pretty fast. It is optimize for i686 and higher. You will notice the difference in speed when you use it. Arch also has a excellent package manager called pacman. Another good thing is arch is not bloated with software in a fresh install. You start with a base system and build from there. The arch website is in my sig.

Read the arch wiki page,it gives detailed instructions to setting up your desktop.

claudius753 11-15-2008 04:15 PM

I don't know why Ubuntu would be that "slow and laggy" on that hardware. What exactly is lagging? Are you sure your video drivers are loaded and working, that could be the issue.

student04 11-15-2008 04:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by claudius753 (Post 3343071)
I don't know why Ubuntu would be that "slow and laggy" on that hardware. What exactly is lagging? Are you sure your video drivers are loaded and working, that could be the issue.

That's just what I was going to mention. Compiz without hardware acceleration would be "laggy" to put it lightly. If not compiz, then something else.

salasi 11-15-2008 05:00 PM

...and what exactly is slow? is it everything, is it user interaction? is it network? is the hard disk light going continuously?

there is probably a simple tweak, but it might just be a bit difficult to work out what exactly is the problem.

lakedude 11-15-2008 05:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rickh (Post 3343019)
http://distrowatch.com/dwres.php?resource=major

Take your pick. They're all equally fast, including Ubuntu. It's not the distro, it's the configuration, and you kind of have to do that yourself. OTOH, default configuration setups are as different as hardware setups. Maybe you'll get lucky and the next default will be a bit more satisfactory. It's a pretty disorganized way to go about it, though. Better you should learn to configure the system you have.

While you may be technically correct about the "configuration" being the issue, as a practical matter some distros are MUCH faster than others, at least the way they come out of the box.

Ubuntu is slow which is why I don't use it. I have no idea why it is slow, I only know that it is.

Puppy, or perhaps the way Puppy is configured makes it the fastest distro I've ever tried. Puppy is small, lite, and fast. It boots in under a minute and in that time it loads completely to RAM (if you have at least 256MB or so). Puppy is solid and has a package manager called PetGet. Puppy is amazingly complete for as small as it is @ ~95MB.

If the OP is looking for a full sized distro, Sabayon and Gentoo are much faster than Ubuntu.

I'm sure a really smart Linux expert could streamline and configure Ubuntu to be fast but a newbie is not going to have the skill to speed up Ubuntu.

rickh 11-15-2008 06:22 PM

Quote:

I'm sure a really smart Linux expert could streamline and configure Ubuntu to be fast but a newbie is not going to have the skill to speed up Ubuntu.
So far, Arch and Puppy have been mentioned as alternatives. Neither is on DistroWatche's list of "major" distributions. I would bet that the OP can't successfully install either. Slackware and Gentoo backers will be here shortly. He can't successfully install them either. Best bet ... work on learning some configuration.

dv502 11-15-2008 06:33 PM

Arch linux is number 16 on distrowatch.

Sometimes the unpopular distros work better than the
major ones. :D

lakedude 11-15-2008 06:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rickh (Post 3343161)
So far, Arch and Puppy have been mentioned as alternatives. Neither is on DistroWatche's list of "major" distributions. I would bet that the OP can't successfully install either.

I'll bet you are wrong.

1) Who cares if Puppy is not on some list of "major" distributions?

2) Puppy can run as a Live CD that has a "Universal Installer" which makes running and installing Puppy easy as pie.

Have you tried Puppy lately?

Here is a link showing how to use the Universal Installer. The instructions are for a USB key but installing to a hard drive would be similar.

http://aronzak.wordpress.com/2008/10...sal-installer/

lakedude 11-15-2008 06:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dv502 (Post 3343167)
Arch linux is number 16 on distrowatch.

Sometimes the unpopular distros work better than the
major ones. :D

Agreed!

And spinoffs can be better than the original as well. I prefer Sabayon to Gentoo even though Sabayon is based on Gentoo.

student04 11-15-2008 07:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rickh (Post 3343161)
Slackware and Gentoo backers will be here shortly.

Peekaboo! Honestly, albeit being a gentoo user I don't ever suggest new or beginning users adopt it because it is too overwhelming, unless that is what they are looking for as starters.

Though it is true you can optimize your system with either of those distros, it is true that Gentoo requires lots configuration.

I also have to agree that Ubuntu is somewhat slower as it is compiled for the widest range of hardware, and that the OP just take some time a figure things out (with our help).

Hey maybe he/she is a fast learner? So why not try another configuration-based distribution? ;)

phantom_cyph 11-15-2008 07:55 PM

You probably should have looked for the other thread yours is copied from. Its like asking "out of all the books ever written, which should I read?"

lakedude 11-15-2008 08:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by phantom_cyph (Post 3343209)
Its like asking "out of all the books ever written, which should I read?"

That question is all but impossible to answer, generally speaking. However in a specific instance, for example in the case of a person joining a Sci Fi book club one could reasonably suggest Asimov's "I, Robot" as required reading.

Picking a distro is similar. If someone asks "what is the best distro?" then the best answer is "for what purpose?"...

That the OP is looking for speed and a package manager, limits the field to a manageable number of choices.

mogrady 11-15-2008 08:36 PM

You might try Mepis 64 bit. I found it fast and has an easy package manager in both Sypatic and KPackage.
Check Distrowatch for their site and downloads.

Good luck, Michael


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