LinuxQuestions.org
Share your knowledge at the LQ Wiki.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 08-17-2005, 07:18 PM   #31
Charred
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2005
Location: Utah, USA
Distribution: Slackware 11
Posts: 816
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 30

I see the International Code as a cluster-flop as well.
 
Old 08-17-2005, 07:40 PM   #32
kencaz
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2005
Location: Las Vegas, NV
Distribution: Mandriva Slackware FreeBSD
Posts: 1,468

Rep: Reputation: 48
"Therefore, the AHJ is the deciding factor"

Well, you may be correct on that, however, you have the right to contest a decision by the AHJ to the NEC to a court and they must specify what code violation according the the NEC that has been broken... again it is an interpreting body... just as the Supreme court interprets the Constitution, but they have no authority to change it.

KC
 
Old 08-17-2005, 09:12 PM   #33
Charred
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2005
Location: Utah, USA
Distribution: Slackware 11
Posts: 816
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 30
So long as that part of the NEC is what has been adopted by the AHJ as code, sure.
 
Old 08-17-2005, 10:42 PM   #34
kencaz
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2005
Location: Las Vegas, NV
Distribution: Mandriva Slackware FreeBSD
Posts: 1,468

Rep: Reputation: 48
Hmm, I think the reverse is true... the AHJ would have to adopte the NEC's code...

KC
 
Old 08-17-2005, 11:36 PM   #35
Charred
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2005
Location: Utah, USA
Distribution: Slackware 11
Posts: 816
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 30
Right. As long as the AHJ had adopted the disputed piece of code as law.
 
Old 11-30-2006, 07:04 PM   #36
Kahless
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Location: Pennsylvainia
Distribution: Slackware / Debian / *Ubuntu / Opensuse / Solaris uname: Brian Cooney
Posts: 503

Rep: Reputation: 30
IF not having it grounded bothers you, it cant hurt to ask nicley


Keep in mind that it might be expensive to rewire the entire building, but it woudnt be nearly as expensive to install the ground spike and just rewire an outlet or two that is likley to be needed for electronics. If I owned my house, thats probally what I would do until I can afford to rewire the entire thing
 
Old 12-15-2006, 11:29 PM   #37
cozy_girl
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Dec 2006
Posts: 1

Rep: Reputation: 0
electricity tingling in hands and arms

Quote:
Originally Posted by KimVette
The adapters can be used in a pinch, and PROVIDING the utility box itself is grounded, your equipment will be grounded (providing you're using a metal screw on the adapter!!!!!!!!), but it's not the ideal solution. I've already posted how to determine how to test if the outlet is properly wired; follow the same directions to test whether the utility box itself is wired. Basically, touch one probe of your voltmeter to the (metal) screw holding the trim plate to the fixture, and touch the other probe to the "narrow" side of the outlet. If you read between 110V and 120V then the utility box is grounded, and the adapter will provide an adequate ground as a temporary solution and will provide some protection for your equipment.

Also: since when are those adapters illegal to use? They're illegal to use for PERMANENT solutions, but not temporary. Are you aware that it's also illegal to use extension cords longer than 6' for permanent situations? Also, appliances cannot have power cords longer than 6' because otherwise they would be in violation of that law? It's not in the NEC that I can recall;l it's an OSHA regulation. Check OSHA sometime.

Also: you don't want to run a UPS on a circuit with a GFCI; the GFCI can falsely detect "leakage" from a UPS when the UPS is monitoring/testing the circuit or when it switches on/off the battery power, tripping the circuit.
I came on this site trying to figure out what is wrong with the wiring in the apartment building I just moved into. I've felt electricity tingling my hands when I've picked up my alarm clock to change it or turn off a lamp. Everything is for two prong usage and I was told that the apartment building has been approved by a housing authority called Hud. Now I'm not so sure that's true (my landlords are very kind and I don't want to be suspicious that they weren't truthful about it being Hud approved).
What is your advice on what I should do?
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
mount: wrong fs type, bad option, bad superblock on /dev/hdc3 Lordandmaker Linux - Hardware 15 06-05-2011 08:55 AM
mount: wrong fs type, bad option, bad superblock on /dev/cdrom, Adil_uk Linux - Hardware 9 02-16-2005 05:50 PM
mount: wrong fs type, bad option, bad superblock on /dev/sdb1 pmoreira Linux - Hardware 5 02-26-2004 10:31 AM
Networking Over Power Outlets-Suggestions? fortezza Linux - Networking 0 02-22-2004 12:57 PM
wrong fs type, bad option, bad superblock on /dev/hdb1, ldare Linux - Hardware 1 02-12-2004 09:03 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:10 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration