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Old 05-30-2009, 08:06 AM   #31
ConnorMarc
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Registered: May 2009
Location: Atlanta, GA
Distribution: Ubuntu 9.04
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jamescondron View Post
No need for anti-virus, because linux isn't as widely used, and POSIX security stuff, viruses aren't an issue- you may get the few that enter the wild, but really they're never as big an issue as anywhere else.

Notable viruses include Bliss (http://math-www.uni-paderborn.de/~axel/bliss/) with it's frankly awesome argument " --bliss-uninfect-files-please"

Wireless; if you want that sorted, there are plenty of people with the experience to help if you post for it
You wouldn't believe it guys.

Today was the first day I actually ran Ubuntu since initially checking to make sure both OSs worked after those installations.

Guess what...the wireless works. I don't know how or why. My guess is the Windows installation has something to do with it? Any answers as to why this could be?

BTW...my chipset info is:
Manufacture: Askey
Interface: PCI
Chipset: Atheros


Thanks.
 
Old 05-30-2009, 08:09 AM   #32
ConnorMarc
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Also, it seems perhaps I should have installed Ubuntu in the allotted freespace I initially set up for it in Windows in the beginning.

It seems I only have 130MBs on this system.

My entire harddrive is 250GBs, and I noticed that it didn't change after the Ubuntu install. Perhaps this is why.

Is there a way I can rectify this (expand my Ubuntu HD space) without uninstalling and reinstalling Ubuntu or Windows or both?

I hope I didn't mess up too bad, seems thats its down to 45MBs now since the Ubuntu just updated.

Whooops.
 
Old 05-30-2009, 08:19 AM   #33
jamescondron
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You may be able to resize it, use
Code:
# gparted
and see if it'll let you. It may be worth doing a quick backup before hand
 
Old 05-30-2009, 08:52 AM   #34
ConnorMarc
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jamescondron View Post
You may be able to resize it, use
Code:
# gparted
and see if it'll let you. It may be worth doing a quick backup before hand
I tried...nothing happened.

So what are my options now?

PS - attached image is screenshot of what I did.
PS2 - I also logged off and am back on my Windows system, was started to freeze in Ubuntu
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Screenshot-gparted-attempt.jpg
Views:	8
Size:	81.4 KB
ID:	727  
 
Old 05-30-2009, 08:54 AM   #35
jamescondron
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apt-get install gparted might do it
 
Old 05-30-2009, 08:37 PM   #36
ConnorMarc
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jamescondron View Post
apt-get install gparted might do it
So I typed that and now the cursur is just blinking after the word.

Also, when I ran Ubuntu, (just got back from this morning) the wireless is out. I'm guessing its those damned updates that I mentioned earlier.

Why is this?
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Screenshot - gParted attempt2.jpg
Views:	2
Size:	51.3 KB
ID:	729  
 
Old 05-30-2009, 08:55 PM   #37
ConnorMarc
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ConnorMarc View Post
So I typed that and now the cursur is just blinking after the word.

Also, when I ran Ubuntu, (just got back from this morning) the wireless is out. I'm guessing its those damned updates that I mentioned earlier.

Why is this?
OK, it could be either I need batteries for my wireless keyboard or the RAM.

But I continued trying and...(see the attachment)

So what does that mean?
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Screenshot - gParted attempt3.jpg
Views:	5
Size:	92.9 KB
ID:	730  
 
Old 05-30-2009, 09:06 PM   #38
archShade
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ConnorMarc View Post
So I typed that and now the cursur is just blinking after the word.

Also, when I ran Ubuntu, (just got back from this morning) the wireless is out. I'm guessing its those damned updates that I mentioned earlier.

Why is this?

This may seem like a stupid question but did you press enter after typing in the above command.

It would surprise me if you needed to install gparted as it comes as standard on ubuntu.

however both gparted and apt-get need root privalges so you need to use sudo.

i.e
Code:
sudo apt-get install gparted
although I would recommend using aptitude to get programs - its just a front end to apt* but deals with uninstalling better.
Code:
sudo aptitude install gparted
to run gparted you should use gksudo instead of sudo as its a graphical tool
Code:
gksudo gparted
both these will ask you for you password - while you type you will get no feedback but just type and press enter.

Sudo give you different permissions and the default for ubuntu is to give you permission for everything on the system. Different users can be given different permission by editing /etc/sudoers there's plenty online to tell you how to do this.

The reason Linux separates up permissions is to do with security
1) you can't accidentally hose your system you know that if your using sudo and typing in your password then you have to be careful.
2)If a hacker gets a account with low permission he cant escalate his power.
 
Old 05-30-2009, 09:31 PM   #39
ConnorMarc
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Quote:
Originally Posted by archShade View Post
This may seem like a stupid question but did you press enter after typing in the above command.

It would surprise me if you needed to install gparted as it comes as standard on ubuntu.

however both gparted and apt-get need root privalges so you need to use sudo.

i.e
Code:
sudo apt-get install gparted
although I would recommend using aptitude to get programs - its just a front end to apt* but deals with uninstalling better.
Code:
sudo aptitude install gparted
to run gparted you should use gksudo instead of sudo as its a graphical tool
Code:
gksudo gparted
both these will ask you for you password - while you type you will get no feedback but just type and press enter.

Sudo give you different permissions and the default for ubuntu is to give you permission for everything on the system. Different users can be given different permission by editing /etc/sudoers there's plenty online to tell you how to do this.

The reason Linux separates up permissions is to do with security
1) you can't accidentally hose your system you know that if your using sudo and typing in your password then you have to be careful.
2)If a hacker gets a account with low permission he cant escalate his power.
It was a good question. I'm thinking it was the RAM or something, cause the wireless keyboard wasn't responding properly while running Ubuntu, although now back on Windows, it works fine.

I attached an updated screenshot in my post after the one you replied too.

My bad.
 
Old 05-30-2009, 09:47 PM   #40
archShade
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Looks like gparted installed correctly.

Now you can use it to resize your partitions however before doing this I would recommend backing up all important data before doing anything.

also note you cant resize mounted partitions so you can't resize root partition. you will also have to unmount you home partition to resize it this can often be difficult but try sudo umount -l home

Your screen shot recommends certain other packages these will be needed for dealing with certain file systems.

(from you screen shot)
Quote:
Suggested Packages:
xfsprogs reiser4progs jfsutils ntfsprogs
Install them in the same way if you need them.
 
Old 05-31-2009, 12:21 AM   #41
ConnorMarc
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Registered: May 2009
Location: Atlanta, GA
Distribution: Ubuntu 9.04
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Quote:
Originally Posted by archShade View Post
Looks like gparted installed correctly.

Now you can use it to resize your partitions however before doing this I would recommend backing up all important data before doing anything.

also note you cant resize mounted partitions so you can't resize root partition. you will also have to unmount you home partition to resize it this can often be difficult but try sudo umount -l home

Your screen shot recommends certain other packages these will be needed for dealing with certain file systems.

(from you screen shot)


Install them in the same way if you need them.
OK, so how do I resize the current partition I'm using? Say I want to resize it to 40GB or 50GBs...what should I do?
 
Old 05-31-2009, 08:50 AM   #42
archShade
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First off Linux installed on one or more partitions

a normal way to install linux is to have one partition mounted at root (/) and another mounted at /home.

Thinking about this it may be very hard to resize a partition mounted as either root or /home when logged in as a user.

To resize /home I can see 2 ways of doing this:

1) Create a root user and make sure you can log in as root. Log in as root and then run gparted. (There's plenty of stuff on Google as to how to add root user to Ubuntu) there is however an argument that having a root user especially one which can log in is a security risk.

2) Boot from a live cd and run gparted from there (The Ubuntu 9.04 cd should work)and resize the /home partion

The only way to resize root (/) I can think of is to go though 2.

Can anyone else think of an alternative way to do this
 
  


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