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Old 10-10-2004, 07:49 PM   #1
Dave.TwoDogS
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Registered: Oct 2004
Location: Saint Cloud, Florida USA
Distribution: Fedora Core 3
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I'm so new to Linux that...


I have not installed Linux yet. I bought a "Dummies" book called Red Hat Linux Fedora 10. I think this is the latest and greatest and Fedora looks user friendly although that doesn't mean much to me because I like figuring out tuff stuff.

I have a laptop (eMachine M6809) that I call "stupidfast" and I run Windoze XP Home on it now. I want to run Linux because it is different and I don't know it. It also appears to be a really kick ass OS and I want to play. I also feel that Linux will be very important in the future so I feel it is something I need to know.

Computers are just a hobby of mine but I do spend alot of time on it. If I install this version of Linux is it highly probable that I will eventually stop using Windows and use only Linux. I have no problem doing that just wondering. Also, I don't believe all my Windows programs will work in Linux but that is something I guess I will have to test. Am I right?

Thank you for any and all your help as I will be visiting frequently and usually with a lot of questions. I will install in the next few days and report in. Bye!
 
Old 10-10-2004, 07:58 PM   #2
bornhj
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Registered: Sep 2004
Location: Canberra, Australia
Distribution: Fedora Core 3, Ubuntu Hoary, Slack 10.1
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Welcome to LQ!

Enjoy Fedora, I like it a lot!
 
Old 10-10-2004, 08:01 PM   #3
foo_bar_foo
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Registered: Jun 2004
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Re: I'm so new to Linux that...

Quote:
Originally posted by Dave.TwoDogS
If I install this version of Linux is it highly probable that I will eventually stop using Windows and use only Linux. Also, I don't believe all my Windows programs will work in Linux but that is something I guess I will have to test. Am I right?

sorry -- we are no good at predicting the future
question2:
no windows programs will run on linux accept using an emulator and then only some (waste of time to even try it !)
sometimes windows programs have a Linux version but almost never
 
Old 10-10-2004, 10:34 PM   #4
ronduncan
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Registered: Jul 2004
Location: Humble, TX
Distribution: Linspire & M$
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Cool Linux Newbie Options

Dave.TwoDogS, you sound like you might be the kind of person could get into Linux and like it. Having some sort of book is a good thing, but you might do well to compare distros. Red Hat is a very good distro and there are great opportunities for employment administering it. However, it is quite different from Mandrake, SuSE, Debian, Linspire and other distros. Most distros are available on bootable CDs and have neat install programs. However, the install programs is one of the areas where distros diverge, especially Red Hat. Actually, Linux installation tends to be much faster and easier than installing Windows and in many cases, your applications are quickly and easily installed in a tandem install with the OS. When everything works right, it can be totally amazing and beautiful. I started with Lindows (now Linspire), but joined Houston Area Linux Users Group to learn more. Also I took a Unix/Linux class at the community college. The class was based on Red Hat (ver. 7.3). As for installing on the eMachine laptop, you might want to join a Linux users group or search the web to investigate what issues you might face. Laptops Linux installation can have some challenges. Perhaps, you should examine the Hardware Compatibility List for Linux and your distro, before starting an installation. On a laptop, you will only have one hard drive, so your dual boot will have to start with repartitioning the hard drive. Check to see if the distro's install program will help you with this. If not, you could use Partition Magic or something equivalent to do a non-destructive partitioning job. Linux distros create a special swap partition and perhaps a boot partition in addition to the main partition. In my class I discovered that Red Hat was different from other distros in the default hard drive organization. Well, this is getting too long. Good Luck!
 
Old 10-10-2004, 11:03 PM   #5
detpenguin
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Registered: Oct 2003
Location: lost in the midwest...
Distribution: Slackware
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i mostly started out like you...wanted to just play with linux...see if i could even teach myself how to install it, let alone use it daily...i kept windows installed, never really intending to give it up, but i realized recently i never log in to windows anymore....you'll love linux...
 
Old 10-10-2004, 11:14 PM   #6
darthtux
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Registered: Dec 2001
Location: 35.7480 N, 95.3690 W
Distribution: Debian, Gentoo, Red Hat, Solaris
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You model isn't listed yet, but this may give you some pointers
http://www.linux-on-laptops.com/emachines.html

Welcome to LQ
 
Old 10-11-2004, 12:36 AM   #7
loninappleton
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Registered: Oct 2004
Distribution: red hat fedora core 2
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Re: Re: I'm so new to Linux that...

Quote:
Originally posted by foo_bar_foo
sorry -- we are no good at predicting the future
question2:
no windows programs will run on linux accept using an emulator and then only some (waste of time to even try it !)
sometimes windows programs have a Linux version but almost never


I am also just setting up Linux--- Fedora Core 2 on
a PII in a removable drive.


I have had probs getting my standard US Robotics modem
activated, but in looking at the hardware list, I was surprised to see my Yamaha RP U100 listed in the soundcard devices.


However, when trying to install the program disk I hit
the wall.


What hope is there in getting the Yam to work without
an emulator.
 
Old 10-11-2004, 01:13 AM   #8
BaltikaTroika
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Registered: Sep 2004
Distribution: Debian 4.0, Ubuntu 6.10, Ubuntu Server 6.06
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If you're willing to put in some effort to get comfortable under Linux, I think you'll be very happy that you gave it a chance.

Although a lot of your favorite software won't be available for Linux, you'll be able to find (in most cases) alternatives with similar capabilities. For example, I used to use Photoshop nearly every day (and never thought that I could find a better piece of software), but I made the transition very quickly and easily to The Gimp. Net browsing will be the same experience (with Firefox) as will listening to MP3s (XMMS is basically WinAmp). You'll have no problem getting used to these.

I keep a Windows partition in order to play some of my favorite games (Wine runs Red Alert 2 a bit slowly for me... need to upgrade!), but that's it.

Dave
 
Old 10-11-2004, 01:42 AM   #9
loninappleton
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Quote:
Originally posted by BaltikaTroika
If you're willing to put in some effort to get comfortable under Linux, I think you'll be very happy that you gave it a chance.

Although a lot of your favorite software won't be available for Linux, you'll be able to find (in most cases) alternatives with similar capabilities. For example, I used to use Photoshop nearly every day (and never thought that I could find a better piece of software), but I made the transition very quickly and easily to The Gimp. Net browsing will be the same experience (with Firefox) as will listening to MP3s (XMMS is basically WinAmp). You'll have no problem getting used to these.

I keep a Windows partition in order to play some of my favorite games (Wine runs Red Alert 2 a bit slowly for me... need to upgrade!), but that's it.

Dave

The USB Yamaha has all of it's controlls on screen:
am-fm radio, pc analog (soundcard) digital and usb,
aux for my tv set. Plus all the left right and volume
and dsp modes which are extensive. I won't be finding
those like photoshop or an email prog. :-(


lon@athenet.net
 
Old 10-11-2004, 02:02 AM   #10
da_zombie
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Registered: Aug 2003
Location: timbuktou
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if you are a first time user dont start with Fedora. youll be disappointed with the interface and it doesnt play mp3s or any videos! choose a much user friendly distro like mandrake.
 
Old 10-11-2004, 03:54 AM   #11
mjjzf
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Registered: Feb 2004
Location: Valby, Denmark / Citizen of the Web
Distribution: Slackware 14.1
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I will certainly say that Mandrake has the most intuitive installation, especially when it comes to partitioning. You don't have to create a partition before installing - this very stable and mature installer will do that for you. It will simply ask if you want to use free Windows partition space for the Linux installation. As for how many partitions you would like, it is difficult to advise on - but you will need a system partition - signified by a "/" - and a swap partition - simply labelled "swap". Conventional wisdom suggests a swap file twice the size of your RAM. You will be asked for which file type; I usually choose ext3 or ReiserFS.
If you need to reinstall occasionally (well, some... most... all of us screw up at first in some way or another), there is a point in creating a "home" partition, which essentially works like WinXP's "Documents and Settings" folder, although slightly less messy. If you create a home partition separately, you can install again, simply leave "home" untouched, and you'll have setup files, documents, music and whatever untouched.
As mentioned before, you can't use Windows programs without an emulator - which sometimes works. CrossOver Office is good, but it costs a bit and doesn't support everything. Still, there is an impressive selection of free Linux software - in every sense of the word "free". If you are unclear of what I mean by that, read the reference in my signature.
Lastly, you should be aware that Mandrake reads files from the Windows partition (-> no need to move music or movie files to the Mandy partition) - it is, however, read-only. You won't be able to edit the files, but if you are working on a document you can get it from Windows and save a local copy for editing. Windows won't be able to read the Linux partitions without a special tool such as YAReG.
 
Old 10-11-2004, 04:22 PM   #12
loninappleton
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Distribution: red hat fedora core 2
Posts: 61

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Quote:
Originally posted by da_zombie
if you are a first time user dont start with Fedora. youll be disappointed with the interface and it doesnt play mp3s or any videos! choose a much user friendly distro like mandrake.


My first foray into Linux was with Knoppix and M. Gagne's
Moving to Linux book. I had to take the book back to the
local lending library. ;-)


Me second (current) foray into Linux is another lending library item (with cds) called _Red had Fedora Linux 2 by
Christopher Negus.


In a few days I'll have to take that back too-- but I can
get this one renewed after wearing out renewals on Moving to Linux.


As a distro for myself to purchase, Suse 9.1 is the
most attractive because it's available locally at Best Buy
with full documentation.


Here is an observation on documentation: I was thinking that for first time users, a series of books rather
than one of these "bibles" would be better. So you'd have
a common introduction for commands in each but be able to buy the stand-alone book on making the internet connection. End of book. Here's the reason: I'm stuck at the modem installation section of Negus' 'bible' and see no
screen shots of the various error messages encountered _or_ the screens under tabs used to set up.


I got the idea from Negus that modem connections are arcane and that not many people use thme anymore so
not much time is devoted to this.


So lastly, which is the most user-friendly _text_ to
get Linux operational enough (I'm back in Window
writing this) to get telecom working so I can come out here
and ask my questions?


lon@athenet.net
 
Old 10-12-2004, 05:25 AM   #13
mjjzf
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Registered: Feb 2004
Location: Valby, Denmark / Citizen of the Web
Distribution: Slackware 14.1
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I read Marcel's book, too, which is a really sweet tool.
I got a good grasp of the basics by visiting the Linux Newbie Administrator Guide and LinuxCommand.
Also, I had laptop issues (the classics: modem and power management) which I found solutions for at Linux-Laptop.net.
 
Old 10-12-2004, 08:44 AM   #14
justin_p
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Registered: Jan 2004
Location: Virginia, USA
Distribution: slack 13; I've used it all :)
Posts: 433

Rep: Reputation: 30
Dave.TwoDogS:

I started off the same way. That was 2 years ago. I have run windows free since then. Just read as much as possible and use the forums here as they are intended, to help you learn linux. Whatever distro you use first, make sure to check their forum under the Distribtuons heading for help. Good luck.
 
Old 10-12-2004, 02:32 PM   #15
loninappleton
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Registered: Oct 2004
Distribution: red hat fedora core 2
Posts: 61

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Quote:
Originally posted by OSourceDiplomat
I read Marcel's book, too, which is a really sweet tool.
I got a good grasp of the basics by visiting the Linux Newbie Administrator Guide and LinuxCommand.
Also, I had laptop issues (the classics: modem and power management) which I found solutions for at Linux-Laptop.net.


Ok. I'll state my specific problem again here... a problem
involving modem and dialout.

I have set up a new account/profile after going through
a number of steps including wvdialconfig.

This got me to the system-config-netwrk box and shows
my one profile as inactive. I have put in the correct
phone number and even the init string in the modem
config.

Modem is a standard US Robotics sportster external.

If a click 'activate' (which should now have all the
stuff in it) I get the following error message:

""Cannot activate network device {ISP name]

Failed to activate [ISP name with Error 2""

I was directed to the manual... pppd to find Errors.
I did not find Error 2 or any other errors at that man page
and no way to search an index.


So I am starting here again.


What am I missing in installing dialup?
 
  


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