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Old 06-11-2010, 06:43 PM   #1
bisket
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how to write over current OS


I have an old Mac OS (Tiger) and the new OS are not backwards compatible with computers as old as mine. In the reading I've found they explain how to partition the hard drive, but this is not what I want. I only want to have the Linux OS. If anyone knows how to simply write over, or make it so the Apple software is gone their advice would be appreciated.


Also, someone brought to my attention that all distros may not be Mac friendly. I've tried my best to find out which distros my computer can support but I havent been able to answer the question. If you know anything about it would you please tell me?


Thanks.
 
Old 06-11-2010, 06:49 PM   #2
jefro
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OS's that we use are on a partition almost always. Mac uses a slightly different type but it is a partition. It is a slice or portion of a hard drive. If you delete that partition and you need to be CAREFUL it will remove the OS.

Most install programs would offer a way to delete partitions.


We would need to know Mac like PowerPC or Mac as in X86. If I knew mac's I might know which tiger goes on. Might need to recheck my work with some mac users posts too just to be safe.

Last edited by jefro; 06-11-2010 at 06:50 PM.
 
Old 06-11-2010, 06:55 PM   #3
bisket
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Hardware Overview:

Machine Model: iBook
CPU Type: PowerPC 750 (22.14)
Number Of CPUs: 1
CPU Speed: 500 MHz
L2 Cache (per CPU): 256 KB
Memory: 256 MB
Bus Speed: 67 MHz
Boot ROM Version: 4.2.0f4

Its running 10.3.9 (which I 90% sure is Tiger).


Is that enough information?
 
Old 06-11-2010, 08:23 PM   #4
Kenny_Strawn
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http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/ports/rele...op-powerpc.iso

You will have to use this port to use the PowerPC architecture, as the main release won't cut it.

And when you boot to the LiveCD and run the installer from the desktop, remember to, when the partitioning step comes up, select the "Use Entire Disk" option (usually the second one) and you've just wiped out OS X Tiger.

And I certainly know why you want to replace the OS: Because the current OS X release (10.6 "Snow Leopard") dropped support for the PowerPC architecture and only supports Intel processors. This is a stupid move by Apple, considering that Apple always wants to hog $$.
 
Old 06-11-2010, 08:40 PM   #5
MTK358
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Debian also has a PowerPC version.
 
Old 06-11-2010, 10:33 PM   #6
bisket
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Yeah, I wanted to switch to an Apple because I was tired of dealing with all the Windows crap. And then I found out that Apple really isnt all that much better.


I went with Debian, and on thier website they had an option to download the files straight to my hard drive and they say it is possible to launch the installer from the hard drive. I tried to partition the hard drive (because thats what I believe I am suppose to do). But when I click partition on the Disk Utility screen (using a Mac PowerPC 10.3.9 OS) it wont let me change anything (all the options are gray). After looking at it some more I realized it said in small font "this disk contains the boot volume and therefore cannot be paritioned". It hasnt been paritioned before so its saying I'm not allowed to split the 10 GB ever and is it really that important to partition it? I don't personally having a problem having the two OS share the free space. I just want to be able to run a decent operating system.

Last edited by bisket; 06-11-2010 at 10:40 PM. Reason: somewhat answered my question
 
Old 06-11-2010, 10:51 PM   #7
bisket
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is it esential to partition the hard drive

essential

I'm about to install Debian on an Apple Power PC with 10.3.9 OS. When I try to partition the hard drive it wont let me and says "this disk contains the boot volume and can not be partitioned". I am personally okay with not having it partitioned. I just want to install linux and not destroy the computer. So is it okay to not partiton it?
 
Old 06-11-2010, 11:24 PM   #8
ronlau9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bisket View Post
essential

I'm about to install Debian on an Apple Power PC with 10.3.9 OS. When I try to partition the hard drive it wont let me and says "this disk contains the boot volume and can not be partitioned".

Who gives you that message the Debian installer or Bootcamp ?

I am personally okay with not having it partitioned. I just want to install linux and not destroy the computer. So is it okay to not partiton it?
What are trying to accomplish ?
A dual boot OS X and Debian ?
Than you need a utility to do so .
You can not just installing a other Os without taking precautions first.
So give us more info first.
 
Old 06-12-2010, 12:15 AM   #9
lupusarcanus
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Partitioning the hard drive is essential and if done incorrectly can destroy everything.
 
Old 06-12-2010, 12:32 AM   #10
pixellany
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I actually think it is possible to use a drive with NO partitions--ie just setup the filesystem on --eg--/dev/sda. Assuming this does work, the only issue is that you can never go back to a "normal" setup without re-installing everything.
 
Old 06-12-2010, 07:44 AM   #11
MTK358
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Just because it has the boot volume does NOT mean the disk can't be partitioned. I think this is to keep computer-illiterate idiots from overwriting Mac OS and then complaining to Apple that their computer doesn't work.

I would recommend you to actually burn a PowerPC Debian CD. The installer has a partitioning utility (that doesn't try to protect you from yourself) in it.
 
Old 06-12-2010, 08:12 AM   #12
onebuck
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Hi,

Welcome to LQ!

Quote:
Originally Posted by bisket View Post
essential

I'm about to install Debian on an Apple Power PC with 10.3.9 OS. When I try to partition the hard drive it wont let me and says "this disk contains the boot volume and can not be partitioned". I am personally okay with not having it partitioned. I just want to install linux and not destroy the computer. So is it okay to not partiton it?
You really don't have the goals and information defined. I suggest that 'How to Ask Questions the Smart Way' would be one link you should look at to help us to help you in the future.

How did you attempt to partition or re-size? Space available to add partitions or do you need to re-size then add partition(s)?
Do you wish to keep the original OS?

If you just want to install a new OS then you will need a partition for '/' and a 'swap'. If you're wanting to use grub then a '/boot' may be necessary which will depend on the filesystem you choose.

If you don't wish to use a 'swap' partition then a 'swapfile' could be used but at a sacrifice. But there will be other issues with the 'swapfile'.

Again, if you read the above link then reform your query. We could possibly assist you. Right now there are a lot of open ends without the thorough definition that would allow us the means to aid.

Just a few more links to aid you;
Linux Documentation Project
Rute Tutorial & Exposition
Linux Command Guide
Utimate Linux Newbie Guide
LinuxSelfHelp
Getting Started with Linux
Bash Reference Manual
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Linux Home Networking
Virtualiation- Top 10

The above links and others can be found at 'Slackware-Links'. More than just SlackwareŽ links!

Last edited by onebuck; 06-12-2010 at 10:21 AM. Reason: spelling
 
Old 06-12-2010, 09:18 AM   #13
MTK358
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bisket View Post
essential

I'm about to install Debian on an Apple Power PC with 10.3.9 OS. When I try to partition the hard drive it wont let me and says "this disk contains the boot volume and can not be partitioned". I am personally okay with not having it partitioned. I just want to install linux and not destroy the computer. So is it okay to not partiton it?
You asked that in your other thread. Can you please stick to it?

I already posted a reply there.
 
Old 06-12-2010, 09:41 AM   #14
pixellany
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I've merged the two closely-related threads. One thread per topic, please.
 
Old 06-12-2010, 04:35 PM   #15
bisket
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I have encountered two major problems.

No matter what I do it will not let me partition the hard drive, and the computer will not boot from disk or invoke OpenFirmware when I restart the computer. It is An Apple Ibook with 10.3.9 OS. The Live CD is Debian PowerPC-1. After writting the files to the CD I looked at it to make sure I did it correctly and I think i did, Its named debian-504-powerpc-CD-1.iso". Which I believe means it was saved as a disk image.

What I'm trying to accomplish: 10.3.9 Is outdated and because the laptop is a PowerPC it cannot be upgraded. My goal is to have an OS that is not outdated. If I can install Debian I probably won't ever use Tiger again. I would prefer to get rid of it, but if it would cause more problems than its worth I'm fine with letting it sit there.

How I attempted to partition: I opened Disk Utility, highlighted the TOSHIBA disk (the only one that even had the option of partitioning), and then went to "partition" screen. Once there I can look at the information but it will not let me change any of the options. It says "This disk contains the boot volume and cannot be partitioned". I have made sure that the hard drive is not locked for editing.

Invoke OpenFirmware: According the the readme that I downloaded from Debian "On PowerPC Macintoshes, you invoke OpenFirmware with Command (cloverleaf/Apple)+Option+o+f while booting." Tried that several times and it didnt work. (it is important to note that I followed the steps they said to do to install from Hard drive)

When I tried to boot from CD: "Currently, the only PowerPC subarchitectures that support CD-ROM booting are PReP (though not all systems) and New World PowerMacs. On PowerMacs, hold the c key, or else the combination of Command, Option, Shift, and Delete keys together while booting to boot from the CD-ROM" I tried both of those methods and neither worked. I am aware that this computer is not a IMac.
Someone had told me that I could go to System preferences and then to Startup Disk and it would allow me to choose to boot from Disk. The only options it allows are starting from 10.3.9, 9.2.2, or Network Startup.

Sorry if I'm still not explaining my troubles well, I'm trying.

Last edited by bisket; 06-12-2010 at 04:41 PM. Reason: left something out
 
  


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