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Old 06-05-2009, 03:06 AM   #1
vitalstrike82
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How to use Gparted to create more than 4 partitions


hi,

i like to ask if is there any way i can create more than 4 partitions?

i want to install slackware and opensolaris in my machine
I plan to partition this way:
hd1 for root
hd5 for root
hd2 for swap
hd6 for swap
hd3 for home
hd7 for home
hd4 for fat (common storage to store files between 2 OS)

However after partition till hd4, i not allow to create hd5 again.

What solutions can i implement?
I know i can remove the home partition for both os, but is there anyway to create more than 4?

Thanks
 
Old 06-05-2009, 03:31 AM   #2
billymayday
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You will have to delete one of your primary partitions and create an extended partition with the necessary logical partitions within it.
 
Old 06-05-2009, 03:34 AM   #3
sycamorex
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Historically, you're only able to create four primary partitions. You'll need to get rid of your partition table and create 3 primary partitions + 1 extended partition. Within the extended partition you can create as many logical partitions as you want.

edit: didn't refresh the page - billymayday was faster

Last edited by sycamorex; 06-05-2009 at 03:36 AM.
 
Old 06-05-2009, 03:48 AM   #4
billymayday
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Yeah, but you gave a better explanation

BM
 
Old 06-05-2009, 07:34 AM   #5
onebuck
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Hi,

A detailed definition by saikee. I couldn't define it better so take a look.

I generally create my systems with 3 primaries and 1 extended partition. That way my growth or even use on the extended is managed a lot easier.
 
Old 06-05-2009, 09:49 AM   #6
sycamorex
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Quote:
Originally Posted by billymayday View Post
Yeah, but you gave a better explanation

BM
Let's not bicker and argue about who killed who

Following saikee's explanation, it turns out you wouldn't be able to create as many logical partitions as you want (as I initially thought). You live you learn.


 
Old 06-05-2009, 02:02 PM   #7
onebuck
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Hi,

Quote:
Originally Posted by sycamorex View Post
Let's not bicker and argue about who killed who

Following saikee's explanation, it turns out you wouldn't be able to create as many logical partitions as you want (as I initially thought). You live you learn.
I read somewhere that saikee has/had 128 different installs on a system. He has provided a lot of useful information.
 
Old 06-21-2009, 01:35 AM   #8
vitalstrike82
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Hi thanks for the information
 
Old 06-21-2009, 02:11 AM   #9
jay73
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Actually, there is nothing that will prevent you from creating 300 primary partitions on a single drive - you just need to make sure that any one never sees more than three of its colleagues. Ranish is one tool that was able to do this - it created a very flexible boot menu where you could pick just which partitions needed to be accessed. Don't know about the current status of the Ranish project, it has become awfully quiet but I see it is still included in the SystemRescue livecd; and similar functionality can be found in a number of commercial solutions.

At this time, linux is limited to 15 partitions/drive (used to be 63 if I remember well) , that is, if you insist on doing things the clean way. Suse did (still does?) offer a workaround, though.

Last edited by jay73; 06-21-2009 at 05:21 AM.
 
Old 06-21-2009, 03:55 AM   #10
brianL
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And you don't need two swaps.
 
Old 06-21-2009, 08:56 AM   #11
onebuck
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Hi,
Quote:
Originally Posted by jay73 View Post
Actually, there is nothing that will prevent you from creating 300 primary partitions on a single drive - you just need to make sure that any one never sees more than three of its colleagues. Ranish is one tool that was able to do this - it created a very flexible boot menu where you could pick just which partitions needed to be accessed. Don't know about the current status of the Ranish project, it has become awfully quiet but I see it is still included in the SystemRescue livecd; and similar functionality can be found in a number of commercial solutions.

At this time, linux is limited to 15 partitions/drive (used to be 63 if I remember well) , that is, if you insist on doing things the clean way. Suse did (still does?) offer a workaround, though.
'Ranish' is a great tool. I use it all the time to work with HDs for clients. Multiple tools in one body. Not everyone would be comfortable with the use/setup but yes it can be done as you state. You can still work with multiple hdd/partitions in a system by using 'hidden magic keys' to a loader. A little more work but done when necessary.

This link and others are available from 'Slackware-Links'. More than just SlackwareŽ links!
 
  


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