LinuxQuestions.org
Latest LQ Deal: Complete CCNA, CCNP & Red Hat Certification Training Bundle
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 10-04-2010, 12:40 AM   #1
pinga123
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2009
Posts: 684
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 36
How to remove group write bit?


I know this may sound little incomplete but this is what i read on some linux hardening guide.I dont have any clue on how to remove group's write bit.


I m posting the exact sentence of the hardening guide.
Quote:
The group write bit should removed from all system files that do not explicitly require it to be enabled
What all system files to be taken care of?
 
Old 10-04-2010, 12:49 AM   #2
Bryanlee
Member
 
Registered: May 2005
Location: Honolulu, HI
Distribution: Ubuntu 10.04
Posts: 56

Rep: Reputation: 15
To remove group write permissions try this.

Code:
chmod g-w directory
Insert your specific directory where you see "directory"

Last edited by Bryanlee; 10-04-2010 at 12:51 AM.
 
Old 10-04-2010, 12:49 AM   #3
vishesh
Member
 
Registered: Feb 2008
Distribution: Fedora,RHEL,Ubuntu
Posts: 661

Rep: Reputation: 66
-rwxrwxr-x filename , I think highlighted bit is group write bit, Using this bit permission bit we can give authorize group members to edit file.

Thanks
 
Old 10-04-2010, 02:32 AM   #4
b0uncer
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Distribution: CentOS, OS X
Posts: 5,131

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Some more information about Linux permissions can be found on various pages on the web, for example this one, covering both the textual and octal representation of permissions. The octal representation is a little more compact than the textual one, and not too difficult to understand, so you should get familiar with it. You'll be using octal representation also if (when) you set umask, which you use to control default permissions when files are created. The difference is that with umask you're setting the mask, not the "direct" representation, so be careful.
 
Old 10-04-2010, 11:15 AM   #5
myposts
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2010
Posts: 46

Rep: Reputation: 21
Here...

you can change the basic permissions by manipulating their corresponding bits. It can be done in numeric format where 1 is to execute, 2 is for write and 4 is for reading. It is too much to type to cover this, UnixAcademy.com has training DVDs that cover it well. Keep in mind that in today's Linuxes, there's also implementation of of ACL (access control list, commands like getfacl, setfacl) for Linux, it is rarely used on a trivial, one user stations, but on servers they are used quite often.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
how to remove the set-group-ID sunilvadranapu Linux - General 5 02-11-2010 08:10 PM
[SOLVED] How to remove a group of packages? quanta Slackware 5 06-27-2009 08:13 AM
Always set group write bit in given directory? jnojr Linux - Newbie 3 05-07-2009 08:29 PM
Group Write Problems gizza23 Linux - General 4 07-27-2007 12:53 PM
Write access for group / other Cubsy Linux - Software 2 11-06-2003 01:03 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:50 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration