LinuxQuestions.org
Help answer threads with 0 replies.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 04-03-2015, 01:19 AM   #1
Gregg Bell
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2014
Location: Illinois
Distribution: Xubuntu
Posts: 1,664

Rep: Reputation: 136Reputation: 136
How to pick a distro


I've got a more powerful computer that you guys have told me will handle any distro. But there's about eight million of them! I've been happy with Xubuntu (I have it on both of my computers) but I also like change. So if I put a different distro (I have Copy.com right now syncing the files between the two Xubuntu computers) on the one computer, is that going to screw up the syncing? And I've heard all the distros have the same relative file structure so navigating shouldn't be a problem. But which distro? And people have said 'try different ones.' Okay, I've got a flash drive, can you give me some links where I can try these cool distros? I've heard Red Hat is good. Some of you guys are Slack fanatics. Mint seems popular. I'm a pretty basic user. Don't need huge bells and whistles. Xubuntu's simplicity has appealed to me. Maybe I should stay with that! I'm open to any and all suggestions. Thanks!
 
Old 04-03-2015, 01:28 AM   #2
ardvark71
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Feb 2015
Location: Oregon, USA
Distribution: Lubuntu 14.04, Windows Vista
Posts: 6,276
Blog Entries: 3

Rep: Reputation: 835Reputation: 835Reputation: 835Reputation: 835Reputation: 835Reputation: 835Reputation: 835
Hi....

Honestly, my personal opinion is if you like it and they both work the way they should, stick with it. Linux can be fussy sometimes.

Regards...

Last edited by ardvark71; 04-03-2015 at 01:31 AM. Reason: Grammar adjustment.
 
Old 04-03-2015, 04:37 AM   #3
pan64
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Mar 2012
Location: Hungary
Distribution: debian/ubuntu/suse ...
Posts: 9,345

Rep: Reputation: 2747Reputation: 2747Reputation: 2747Reputation: 2747Reputation: 2747Reputation: 2747Reputation: 2747Reputation: 2747Reputation: 2747Reputation: 2747Reputation: 2747
have you checked: http://distrowatch.com/ already?
 
Old 04-03-2015, 05:11 AM   #4
brianL
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Oldham, Lancs, England
Distribution: Slackware & Slackware64 14.1
Posts: 7,453
Blog Entries: 55

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
How do you find out which films, books, food, etc, etc, etc...you prefer? You try a variety. Common sense. Same applies to Linux distros. If Xubuntu suits you - stick with it. But if you're curious about the others - try them. There is no alternative to trying them for yourself and choosing what suits YOU best. Get on with it.
 
Old 04-03-2015, 05:24 AM   #5
beachboy2
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jan 2007
Location: Wild West Wales, UK
Distribution: Linux Mint 18 MATE, antiX-16.1, MX-16
Posts: 2,090
Blog Entries: 9

Rep: Reputation: 755Reputation: 755Reputation: 755Reputation: 755Reputation: 755Reputation: 755Reputation: 755
Gregg Bell,

Have a look at Linuxed for umpteen reviews:

http://mylinuxexplore.blogspot.co.uk...-contents.html

Dedoimedo's reviews are also worth a look:

http://www.dedoimedo.com/computer_software.html#linux

Quote:
I'm a pretty basic user. Don't need huge bells and whistles. Xubuntu's simplicity has appealed to me.
In that case, using the K.I.S.S. principle, I would recommend Linux Mint 17.1 MATE, as reviewed here:

http://mylinuxexplore.blogspot.co.uk...te-review.html


As brianL put it so succinctly:

Quote:
There is no alternative to trying them for yourself and choosing what suits YOU best. Get on with it.

Last edited by beachboy2; 04-03-2015 at 06:07 AM.
 
Old 04-03-2015, 07:10 AM   #6
273
LQ Addict
 
Registered: Dec 2011
Location: UK
Distribution: Debian Sid AMD64, Raspbian Wheezy, various VMs
Posts: 6,657

Rep: Reputation: 1911Reputation: 1911Reputation: 1911Reputation: 1911Reputation: 1911Reputation: 1911Reputation: 1911Reputation: 1911Reputation: 1911Reputation: 1911Reputation: 1911
If you haven't already I would suggest trying Ubuntu -- I have to admit I hate Unity (it's desktop) but it is different and if you like it you'll only find it on Ubuntu.
Slackware is worth a try because if it works for you and you like it you won't find anything better.
If you use Xubuntu then I would also say it's worth trying Debian with XFCE as it's essentially the same thing without some bells and whistles. Personally, though, I only tend to run Debian Sid, the "unstable" branch, because the stable branch of Debian seems out of date (it's not, really, but versions of things are old). I find Sid is actually darn stable as long as software upgrades are performed with caution.
Red Hat costs money (I seem to recall about $200 minimum) to use but there are CentOS which is a free version of it and Fedora which is a cutting-edge testing ground for it both of which are worth looking at depending upon what you're looking for.
I ought to mention, also, that if you haven't already tried just installing KDE, XFCE and other desktop environments in Xubuntu you ought to because it's worth remembering that with Linux you can have many DEs and choose which one to use.
 
Old 04-03-2015, 08:38 AM   #7
rtmistler
Moderator
 
Registered: Mar 2011
Location: Sutton, MA. USA
Distribution: MINT Debian, Angstrom, SUSE, Ubuntu
Posts: 5,265
Blog Entries: 12

Rep: Reputation: 1862Reputation: 1862Reputation: 1862Reputation: 1862Reputation: 1862Reputation: 1862Reputation: 1862Reputation: 1862Reputation: 1862Reputation: 1862Reputation: 1862
Hard to advise you here. You like to change, but you don't need huge bells and whistles and what you have now appeals to you. Ending with maybe you should stay with that as your own thought.

Yeah ... stay with it. There's nothing saying you have to try anything new.

I personally go with what works and don't fuss about trying new distros much at all.

Fact is I try a new one when I get a new computer, so that's as normal as what you're saying.

Other fact is I many times end up keeping what I had because I liked that.
 
Old 04-03-2015, 10:57 AM   #8
JWJones
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2009
Location: Cascadia
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 922

Rep: Reputation: 276Reputation: 276Reputation: 276
Pick a window manager or desktop environment, pick a package manager, pick the tools you need to do what you do. Sounds like you already have that. Distrohopping is mostly a waste of time, unless what you are using doesn't serve your needs somehow. You can go anywhere you want and need to from Xubuntu. There's lots to learn from right there.
 
Old 04-03-2015, 10:59 AM   #9
273
LQ Addict
 
Registered: Dec 2011
Location: UK
Distribution: Debian Sid AMD64, Raspbian Wheezy, various VMs
Posts: 6,657

Rep: Reputation: 1911Reputation: 1911Reputation: 1911Reputation: 1911Reputation: 1911Reputation: 1911Reputation: 1911Reputation: 1911Reputation: 1911Reputation: 1911Reputation: 1911
I'll just pop in and mention that VirtualBox and other virtual machine players are a good way to see how distributions look/
 
2 members found this post helpful.
Old 04-03-2015, 11:44 AM   #10
DavidMcCann
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jul 2006
Location: London
Distribution: CentOS, Salix
Posts: 4,465

Rep: Reputation: 1399Reputation: 1399Reputation: 1399Reputation: 1399Reputation: 1399Reputation: 1399Reputation: 1399Reputation: 1399Reputation: 1399Reputation: 1399
I've used most of them, and the thing you notice most of all is obviously the GUI. Have a look here for the options:
https://renewablepcs.wordpress.com/a...gnome-or-xfce/

Ubuntu gives you a good selection.
Unity: make your computer look like a phone!
Gnome: Ubuntu probably gives the best Gnome implementation at the moment.
Mate: nice but not very different to Xfce. I haven't tired in in Ununtu, but Mint is excellent.
KDE: the GUI with added WOW! It's some time since I've tried Kubuntu but I can't remember many problems.
LXDE: Lubuntu is not bad.

Then you have the window managers. Some are a bit weird or limited, but good ones are
Enlightenment: pretty, but very tricky to configure. Bodhi is the best implementation.
Openbox and Fluxbox: similar and quite good. Try the Salix version of Fluxbox.
Icewm: my favourite, and the default for AntiX.

It's best to stick to the GUIs offered as default, or at least on a dedicated installation disk. Fedora is great with Gnome, passable with KDE, but you really do not want the Xfce version.

The other differences are mostly seen occasionally, in the "housekeeping tools" for installation, initial configuration, adding software, etc. If you want something not in the Debian tradition, there's
OpenSUSE: not bad, but do stick to the KDE version (or the Gnome, at a pinch).
PCLinuxOS: excellent.
Arch: The best for documentation, but no installation program, so use a derivative like Manjaro.
Slackware: The old reliable, but best experienced in its derivative Salix.
Fedora: dreadful installer, so read the instructions and take notes. Once installed, it has excellent tools, but only if you stick to the Gnome version.
 
Old 04-03-2015, 03:05 PM   #11
Germany_chris
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jun 2011
Location: Stuttgart, Germany
Distribution: Arch
Posts: 1,027

Rep: Reputation: 481Reputation: 481Reputation: 481Reputation: 481Reputation: 481
I actually like the Unity desktop I'm using it right now on Arch. I will say if you like XFCE it'll be a big enough change that you'll probably hate it. I also get along very well with Mate but styled like Gnome 2 not the way Linux Mint does it.
 
Old 04-03-2015, 05:21 PM   #12
GNU/Linux
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2012
Distribution: Slackware-14
Posts: 118

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
If you don't know how to pick a distro, you can always pay for one .

Hint: M$
 
Old 04-03-2015, 06:38 PM   #13
dunnery
Member
 
Registered: May 2010
Location: East Stroudsburg
Distribution: Debian Jessie
Posts: 222

Rep: Reputation: 8
Mint and ubuntu

If you are a windows guy get the mint with the cinnamon desktop. If you like the Mac set up get ubuntu with the unity desktop. Both of them are equally are cool and efficient it's just a case of what you are used to before your journey into linux. You can achieve the same on each distro. If there are programs included in the mint Distro that are not on the ubuntu distro simply download them from the software center........ And once you've done that you should turn to your old windows or Mac computer and put your middle finger up. Because that's really what all this is about. Have fun and don't forget to put your middle finger up.
 
Old 04-04-2015, 12:22 AM   #14
Gregg Bell
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2014
Location: Illinois
Distribution: Xubuntu
Posts: 1,664

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 136Reputation: 136
Thanks so much everyone! And boy, were a lot of your replies surprising. (I never expected so many of you to say basically, 'if Xubuntu is working for you, stay with it.') Thanks for all the excellent links and screenshots of GUIs and reviews.

I'm leaning toward staying with Xubuntu because I'm only changing over one computer, and the two computers (both Xubuntu) I have are sycned. If they were different distros would that present a problem for the syncing? For anything?

And yeah, I want to try some of these distros. I have a flash drive (but someone told me I should reformat it so it's empty before I put the trial distros on there (think I need to? I ask because I don't know how to)) but where do I find these trial distros? Can you give me links?

Then what, I just download the trial distro onto the flash drive and then plug it in?

Thanks!
 
Old 04-04-2015, 01:14 AM   #15
Ztcoracat
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Dec 2011
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 7,545
Blog Entries: 10

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gregg Bell View Post
Thanks so much everyone! And boy, were a lot of your replies surprising. (I never expected so many of you to say basically, 'if Xubuntu is working for you, stay with it.') Thanks for all the excellent links and screenshots of GUIs and reviews.

I'm leaning toward staying with Xubuntu because I'm only changing over one computer, and the two computers (both Xubuntu) I have are sycned. If they were different distros would that present a problem for the syncing? For anything?

And yeah, I want to try some of these distros. I have a flash drive (but someone told me I should reformat it so it's empty before I put the trial distros on there (think I need to? I ask because I don't know how to)) but where do I find these trial distros? Can you give me links?

Then what, I just download the trial distro onto the flash drive and then plug it in?

Thanks!
I liked Xubuntu too when I was running it.
It's a pretty sure bet that you'll like Ubuntu if you like Xubuntu.
And you may even like Voyager-
http://www.ubuntu.com/download
http://distrowatch.com/table.php?distribution=voyager

Red Hat BTW is a Server Class Distribution used mainly for the Enterprise. You would have to make a contract and pay Red Hat for a Subscription.

Try CentOS which is the free version (rebuild) of RH.
If you decide to install CentOS and have a ethernet connection (DSL) Ethernet interfaces are not enabled by default in RHEL/CentOS just to give you a head's up:-
http://www.centos.org/download/

All other Linux distributions can be found at Distro Watch:-
http://distrowatch.com/

I agree with 273 Virtual Machines are a good way to try distributions rather than filling up usb sticks or burning up all of your DVD's or CD's- Virtual Box works well.
https://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloads
 
1 members found this post helpful.
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Help me pick a distro albo23 Linux - Newbie 16 08-19-2008 09:47 AM
Distro Slam Time, You Pick The Distro madaxman Linux - General 6 06-12-2007 06:02 PM
Help me pick a distro! Pyro-Bane Linux - Newbie 16 04-25-2006 07:00 AM
Which distro to pick?? TonyDTV Linux - Newbie 21 01-11-2006 09:52 AM
Help pick distro. Genticle Linux - Newbie 7 08-29-2005 05:49 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:02 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration