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KobusvW01 09-11-2012 12:57 PM

How to Mount usb drive and other questions
 
Hi,

Thanks in advance for the help. I have never used any Linux based products, so please assume I know nothing. I have just installed ububtu on my Acer Aspire AOA 110 notebook. When I plugged in the usb flash drive a message came up saying I am not allowed to'mount' the drive, detail tag'you have to be a superuser o mount drive'. How do I correct this.

I also have problems activating the wireless connection, and if I get it to connect, I cannot access the internet.

It would be appreciated if someone can assist, step by step with the above.

Thanks

Reokie 09-11-2012 01:40 PM

Hey,

Once the kernel discovers that a new storage device was found, (you can verify this via dmesg), linux creates a new block device for it under /dev/, you can verify this by running the command:

Code:

fdisk -l
You should see a new entry after you insert the USB drive.

Afterwards, create a "mount point" a place to "install" the drive:
Code:

mkdir /mnt/[sdx, or sdb or sdc, depends on the new entry in fdisk]
At this point your file manager should be able to see the new drive.

source: http://linuxconfig.org/Howto_mount_USB_drive_in_Linux

- - - - - -

For your wireless problem, most likely ubuntu doesnt have the drivers for your netbook's wireless chipset out-of-the-box, some chipsets have non-free drivers that ubuntu cant use by default, but ubuntu does give the option to install those drivers. Thats the main reason why I switched to fedora since it had the drivers ubuntu didnt for my chipset out of the box

KobusvW01 09-11-2012 02:02 PM

Thanks for the reply, I will give it a try.

Regards

suicidaleggroll 09-11-2012 02:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Reokie (Post 4777879)
Hey,

Once the kernel discovers that a new storage device was found, (you can verify this via dmesg), linux creates a new block device for it under /dev/, you can verify this by running the command:

Code:

fdisk -l
You should see a new entry after you insert the USB drive.

Afterwards, create a "mount point" a place to "install" the drive:
Code:

mkdir /mnt/[sdx, or sdb or sdc, depends on the new entry in fdisk]
At this point your file manager should be able to see the new drive.

source: http://linuxconfig.org/Howto_mount_USB_drive_in_Linux

You missed the part where he actually mounts it. Also, there is no need to name the mount location after the device name.

It's very simple. Just make a directory where you want to mount the drive. You can call it /mnt/drive, /jim/bob, it doesn't matter. You do this with:
Code:

sudo mkdir -p [directory]
Then determine your drive name with:
Code:

sudo fdisk -l
Finally, mount the drive with:
Code:

sudo mount [device] [directory]

For a full example, say fdisk tells you your drive is /dev/sdc, and the partition you want to mount is /dev/sdc1:
Code:

sudo mkdir -p /mnt/drive
sudo mount /dev/sdc1 /mnt/drive


JaseP 09-11-2012 04:49 PM

The Acer Aspire AOA 110 ships with about 5 different Wifi cards... from a terminal, run lspci and show the output...

Code:

lspci
It may be as simple as enabling the backports repository in the synaptic package manager...

Also, Ubuntu will typically automount USB drives by default setup... what version of Ubuntu are you running???

KobusvW01 09-12-2012 05:20 AM

Hi All,

I have posted a reply earlier, but it seems I have made a mistake. I can't see it now. Thanks for the advice, but I am no further. I told you I am a TOTAL novice. I am not sure what version of 'ubuntu' I have. I installed it through Easy Peasy on Monday. If I start up the computer in comes up as ubuntu eee. Where do I look for the version?

Also if I type in any of the code you have given me, I get the message ' Nautilus cannot handle this kind of location'. I probably enter it in the wrong location.

Am I too stupid to get it fixed and should I rather get someone to fix it form me, or would it be possible for someone on this forum to take me through step by stem from the home screen.

Thanks for the support anyway.

cheers

suicidaleggroll 09-12-2012 08:16 AM

You need to run these commands from a terminal, not in the file browser. You should be able to find a terminal in the menu somewhere, under system or utilities or something like that.

KobusvW01 09-12-2012 08:51 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Thanks, I got it.

I entered lspci and got a response. I have taken a photograph of the screen, as I was unable to get it onto this post in any other way, and it is attached to thie post as a jpg.

Thanks

JaseP 09-18-2012 02:41 PM

Found at the AskUbuntu website...

From a terminal, execute the command:
Code:

sudo gedit /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist.conf
Check if you find:
Code:

#blacklist acer_wmi
In the file,... and delete the number sign. If you can't find that line, please add at the end of the file:
Code:

blacklist acer_wmi
and leave a blank return line at the end (I do, at least...)... save the blacklist file and reboot.

Then open a terminal again and use the following command:
Code:

sudo rfkill list

JaseP 09-18-2012 02:52 PM

Oops, follow-up...

In a terminal:
Code:

sudo apt-get install linux-backports-modules-maverick-generic-wireless

modprobe ath5k

Reboot after...

KobusvW01 09-19-2012 01:25 AM

Thanks for your help JaseP.

I followed your instruction, and everything worked up to the point where I have to enter 'sudo rfkill list' after I have restarted. It says: 'command not found'. When I tried it again from the beginning, the 'blacklist acer_wmi' comes up after entering: sudo gedit /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist.conf, so the file is there, but once again, it cannot find the command.

Any suggestions???

JaseP 09-19-2012 12:14 PM

Is there anything on that machine that you want to keep?

If not, I'd recommend downloading a copy of either Ubuntu 10.04 LTS or Kubuntu 10.04 LTS,... 32-bit versions, and installing those... The latest official Ubuntu version, 12.04 LTS, has some "issues" in my opinion. Version 12.10 isn't in an official release yet.

Easy-peasy is a derivitive of Ubuntu, geared for netbooks. I've never been particularly fond of it. From the looks of it, it doesn't come with a gnome environment installed. More likely, it's built on the more lighweight xfce window manager.

As a newbie,... you'll be better off with a more mainstream distro.

KobusvW01 09-20-2012 01:17 AM

Thanks JaseP.

There is nothing on the machine I would want to keep.

The problem is I have no internet connection, cannot mount a flash drive, and there is no disk drive.

I suppose I have to uninstall the current version of ubuntu and then re-install one of the other version.

I will give it a try, thanks

Kallaste 09-20-2012 07:47 PM

I think you should definitely follow JaseP's advice and get a different, more stable version, but if you really want to mount that flash drive, suicidalegroll's instructions from post #4 (entered from a terminal) will work perfectly.

KobusvW01 09-21-2012 02:10 AM

Thanks BloomingNutria,

I tried that as well. I get to the second step: 'mkdir /mnt/{in my case sdb}', and then the response is 'mkdir: cannot create directory mnt/sdb/: Permission denied'

I cannot get beyond that point.

However, I will look at the other versions of ubuntu as recommended.

Thanks


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