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Old 01-15-2011, 03:59 AM   #1
TigerLinux
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How to know you are running 32 or 64 bit Linux?


in console, type what command to know your OS bit?
 
Old 01-15-2011, 04:06 AM   #2
TheIndependentAquarius
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Code:
anisha@linux-dpjj:~> uname -m -p -i
i686 i686 i386
 
Old 01-15-2011, 04:24 AM   #3
TigerLinux
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mine is
Linux asus 2.6.35-22-generic #33-Ubuntu SMP Sun Sep 19 20:34:50 UTC 2010 i686 GN
means what?
32 bit?
 
Old 01-15-2011, 04:32 AM   #4
TigerLinux
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any software like CPUZ for linux?
 
Old 01-15-2011, 05:20 AM   #5
z99
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as far as i know:
to find if your processor is 64bit
the command would be:
cat /proc/cpuinfo|grep flags
Quote:
flags : fpu vme de pse tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic mtrr pge mca cmov pat pse36 clflush dts acpi mmx fxsr sse sse2 ss ht tm pbe nx lm constant_tsc arch_perfmon pebs bts aperfmperf pni dtes64 monitor ds_cpl vmx est tm2 ssse3 cx16 xtpr pdcm lahf_lm ida tpr_shadow vnmi flexpriority
flags : fpu vme de pse tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic mtrr pge mca cmov pat pse36 clflush dts acpi mmx fxsr sse sse2 ss ht tm pbe nx lm constant_tsc arch_perfmon pebs bts aperfmperf pni dtes64 monitor ds_cpl vmx est tm2 ssse3 cx16 xtpr pdcm lahf_lm ida tpr_shadow vnmi flexpriority
lm means long mode which indicates your cpu is 64 bit,
and the command(s):
Quote:
getconf LONG_BIT
and
Quote:
uname -a
uname -a should show you if you have 64 bit kernel.If it doesn’t say 64 somewhere,it’s not 64 bit.Commonly 32-bit would be i686,i386,
getconf LONG-BIT will return 32 for 32bit OS and 64 for 64bit OS.
hope this help,

Last edited by z99; 01-15-2011 at 05:22 AM.
 
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Old 01-15-2011, 10:32 AM   #6
TigerLinux
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64bit Ubuntu will make what differences?
 
Old 01-15-2011, 11:26 AM   #7
jmc1987
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64bit Linux in general (including ubuntu) will make most apps run faster, your hardware can see more than 4gb of ram (of course you can use pae kernel with 32bit), you are able to use 32 and 64 bits apps (long as you have 32 and 64 bit libraries), get the most out of your 64bit cpu and more
 
Old 01-15-2011, 12:15 PM   #8
johnsfine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TigerLinux View Post
mine is
Linux asus 2.6.35-22-generic #33-Ubuntu SMP Sun Sep 19 20:34:50 UTC 2010 i686 GN
means what?
32 bit?
Yes, 32 bit.

All of the i#86 codes (such as your i686) mean 32 bit x86.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TigerLinux View Post
64bit Ubuntu will make what differences?
Probably very little.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmc1987 View Post
64bit Linux in general (including ubuntu) will make most apps run faster
Based on what evidence? I don't have hard evidence either, but I think most apps run a very tiny amount slower in 64bit mode. Some apps run a moderate amount faster in 64bit mode and the average is likely faster for 64bit even if the majority are slower.

Quote:
your hardware can see more than 4gb of ram (of course you can use pae kernel with 32bit)
So more than 4GB physical ram is not an important boundary for the 32bit vs. 64bit decision. Depending on how you use your system, a 32-bit PAE kernel is probably short of kernel virtual memory around 16GB of physical ram, maybe 12GB or conceivably even less. A 64 bit kernel has effectively limitless kernel virtual memory. So there is some physical memory size that affects the 32bit vs. 64bit decision, but it isn't as low as 4GB.

Quote:
you are able to use 32 and 64 bits apps (long as you have 32 and 64 bit libraries)
Translation: (in a 64 bit Linux install) you'll probably install and use both 32 bit and 64 bit libraries, so you will use both extra disk space and extra physical ram to hold that semi redundant content. So if you are severely short of either disk space or ram, that extra storage will be a problem. With ordinary amounts of disk and ram, that extra is too small to care about.

Quote:
get the most out of your 64bit cpu and more
Does that just mean the psychological benefit of using a 64 bit CPU as such? Otherwise, "get the most out of" cannot be a separate benefit. It can only represent the debatable real benefits.

I have always installed 64-bit Linux when I had that choice (hardware and distribution support available). Maybe 64 bit is better, maybe it is worse (too hard for me to measure) but especially considering software trends into the future, the chance that 64bit is or will be a lot better outweighs the chance that it is a little worse.

I generally do not advise anyone to change an existing 32bit install to 64bit, because I think that change is likely to be harder than installing Linux from scratch (because of all the settings and options etc. you've accumulated since installing).

Choosing 64 bit instead of 32 bit when you're doing a full install anyway is a very inexpensive choice and reasonable to do based on only unsupported speculation that 64 bit might be better.

Switching is harder and deserves a more informed choice.

Last edited by johnsfine; 01-15-2011 at 12:17 PM.
 
Old 01-16-2011, 09:39 PM   #9
TigerLinux
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Dear Friends,
now I am running Ubuntu Ultimate 32 bit,
but I have just got a 64bit ISO file,
my CPU is 64bit,
32 bit is running well, but i never install 64 bit linux,
I wish to try 64 bit, but many people it makes no significant difference you can "feel",
so i am indecisive,
do you think worth installing the 64bit Ubuntu?
 
Old 01-16-2011, 09:46 PM   #10
lazlow
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While I am a big fan of 64bit, I would tell you to use what you have installed. When you install the next time(new release, fubar something, etc) consider using 64bit. Doing large number crunching (video conversion, photo editing, etc) will show you a HUGE improvement in performance(using 64bit). Web browsing and similar stuff you really will not be able to tell the difference.
 
Old 01-17-2011, 12:38 AM   #11
TigerLinux
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lazlow View Post
While I am a big fan of 64bit, I would tell you to use what you have installed. When you install the next time(new release, fubar something, etc) consider using 64bit. Doing large number crunching (video conversion, photo editing, etc) will show you a HUGE improvement in performance(using 64bit). Web browsing and similar stuff you really will not be able to tell the difference.
thanks for your advice, when new final release of ubuntu 11.04 is available, i will download the 64bit version.
 
Old 01-17-2011, 08:55 AM   #12
onebuck
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Hi,

Quote:
Originally Posted by TigerLinux View Post
Dear Friends,
now I am running Ubuntu Ultimate 32 bit,
but I have just got a 64bit ISO file,
my CPU is 64bit,
32 bit is running well, but i never install 64 bit linux,
I wish to try 64 bit, but many people it makes no significant difference you can "feel",
so i am indecisive,
do you think worth installing the 64bit Ubuntu?
I suggest that you reread johnsfine's #8 post directed to answer your query, again for understanding. If you have any question then present the query.

32bit vs 64bit debate is moot. If 32 bit meets your needs then why change? Expected gain? Most applications are still 32bit. This said generally, you could install 64 bit Gnu/Linux with a multilib to take advantage of both.

 
Old 01-17-2011, 10:11 AM   #13
lazlow
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Quote:
Most applications are still 32bit.
While there were a lot of applications that were 32 bit only in the past (pre 2008), today most things come in a 32bit or 64 bit version. Flash was probably the last mainstream holdout and it has had a 64bit version for quite a while.
 
Old 01-17-2011, 04:00 PM   #14
onebuck
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Hi,

I'll bet that there are more 32 bit apps then 64bit for Gnu/Linux.
 
Old 01-17-2011, 05:46 PM   #15
lazlow
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While that MAY be true, I would bet the ones that do not have a 64 bit version are pretty obscure. Virtually anything you can compile, can be compiled 64 bit.
 
  


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