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Old 12-04-2014, 12:33 AM   #1
Gregg Bell
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How to know what distro to get if I get a new computer?


Right now I'm using Xubuntu and I love it. But if I get a bigger computer (my computer only has 19GB left) how do I know what kind of distro to get? And will I have to re-learn a whole new computer lingo thing. I mean, I know the GUIs will be different but will the terminal and file systems be recognizably similar? (Not into change lately.) Thanks!
 
Old 12-04-2014, 12:54 AM   #2
unSpawn
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There is absolutely nothing that would keep you from running a current, maintained version of the Linux distribution you like on a new personal computer.
 
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Old 12-04-2014, 12:55 AM   #3
evo2
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Hi,

the difference between the different 'buntu flavours (xubuntu, kubuntu, ubuntu etc) is really just the desktop. Pretty much everything else is the same (including the filesystem and shell). If you are happy with Xubuntu I suggest you stick with it. If you want to try a different gui, just install the appropriate packages.

Evo2.
 
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Old 12-04-2014, 08:59 AM   #4
simplybill
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why not save money and get a big terabyte external?
But then again Im cheap.
Then you dont have to download files and it saves money, besides what are you planning to do with the old computer?
 
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Old 12-04-2014, 10:47 PM   #5
jefro
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For the most part a new computer should be able to run your loved OS. Some new tricks may need to be learned as a great deal has changed in the last few years. I believe folks should be able to assist you with any new changes.
 
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Old 12-04-2014, 11:17 PM   #6
suicidaleggroll
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The difference between Xubuntu and any of the other *buntu distros is just the desktop. The CLI, basic commands, filesystem, and configuration utilities are all the same.

The difference between Xubuntu and any other Linux distro is the desktop and configuration utilities/package management system. The CLI, filesystem, basic commands, etc. are all the same. Well there's also that idiotic Windows-esque "first user is admin and can do anything via sudo" philosophy that Ubuntu and its derivatives follow, but other than that...

I think you'll find that once you branch out, pretty much any Linux distro is the same "under the hood". 99% of the differences between them are in the package management system and configuration utilities, but even those typically aren't that different either. There are also different philosophies with regards to stable/beta/alpha versions of packages, but that doesn't change how you use the system, just how stable it is.

I have RHEL systems, CentOS systems, Fedora systems, Mint systems, Debian systems, OpenSUSE systems...sometimes I forget which one I'm on since they're all so similar.

"apt-get update && apt-get upgrade" vs "yum update" vs "zypper up"...beyond that, if you're working on the command line, there's really not much difference.

Last edited by suicidaleggroll; 12-04-2014 at 11:19 PM.
 
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Old 12-05-2014, 01:09 AM   #7
Gregg Bell
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Quote:
Originally Posted by simplybill View Post
why not save money and get a big terabyte external?
But then again Im cheap.
Then you dont have to download files and it saves money, besides what are you planning to do with the old computer?
Can I extend my programs onto the external? (I thought externals were just for storage.) That really might not be bad because my computer (Dell Optiplex 170L) despite being ancient still works really good. So when I run out of room on my hard drive I could just add new programs (say a CD burning program) onto the external hard drive? And what do you mean I wouldn't have to download files? (No idea what I'd do with the old one.) If it's just an external I need then couldn't I just plug in a 64GB USB drive? Thanks.
 
Old 12-05-2014, 01:11 AM   #8
Gregg Bell
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suicidaleggroll View Post
The difference between Xubuntu and any of the other *buntu distros is just the desktop. The CLI, basic commands, filesystem, and configuration utilities are all the same.

The difference between Xubuntu and any other Linux distro is the desktop and configuration utilities/package management system. The CLI, filesystem, basic commands, etc. are all the same. Well there's also that idiotic Windows-esque "first user is admin and can do anything via sudo" philosophy that Ubuntu and its derivatives follow, but other than that...

I think you'll find that once you branch out, pretty much any Linux distro is the same "under the hood". 99% of the differences between them are in the package management system and configuration utilities, but even those typically aren't that different either. There are also different philosophies with regards to stable/beta/alpha versions of packages, but that doesn't change how you use the system, just how stable it is.

I have RHEL systems, CentOS systems, Fedora systems, Mint systems, Debian systems, OpenSUSE systems...sometimes I forget which one I'm on since they're all so similar.

"apt-get update && apt-get upgrade" vs "yum update" vs "zypper up"...beyond that, if you're working on the command line, there's really not much difference.
Great explanation. Thanks!
 
Old 12-05-2014, 09:50 AM   #9
Germany_chris
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gregg Bell View Post
Can I extend my programs onto the external? (I thought externals were just for storage.) That really might not be bad because my computer (Dell Optiplex 170L) despite being ancient still works really good. So when I run out of room on my hard drive I could just add new programs (say a CD burning program) onto the external hard drive? And what do you mean I wouldn't have to download files? (No idea what I'd do with the old one.) If it's just an external I need then couldn't I just plug in a 64GB USB drive? Thanks.
You could just pick up a larger hard drive or second internal, drop your home folder onto the second drive leaving the first for the OS this is what I do / and swap on a SSD home on a platter. You could also just get a bigger drive and clone your old to the new one and adjust partition sizes with gparted live. Then in the future you could just install your new bigger drive into a new computer if you get one.
 
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Old 12-05-2014, 12:41 PM   #10
Gregg Bell
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Germany_chris View Post
You could just pick up a larger hard drive or second internal, drop your home folder onto the second drive leaving the first for the OS this is what I do / and swap on a SSD home on a platter. You could also just get a bigger drive and clone your old to the new one and adjust partition sizes with gparted live. Then in the future you could just install your new bigger drive into a new computer if you get one.
Thanks Chris. I'm going to explore your suggestions. Appreciate it.
 
  


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