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Old 12-21-2010, 10:37 PM   #1
password636
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How to know all the kernels used by a Linux distribution?


Hi

Take Red Hat Enterprise Linux for example, it has U1 to U5 editions, and each edition supported several kernels, like U5 supported 2.6.18-194.el5PAE, 2.6.18-194.el5xen and 2.6.18-194.el5.

How can I know all the kernels supported by each edition of various Linux distribution? Like all the kernels supported by Red Hat Enterprise Linux U3 or Debian 5.0, or SUSE 11. Is there any websites providing such information or I have to log in their official site to look for? And how can I be kept posted with such information?

THANKS!
 
Old 12-22-2010, 12:28 AM   #2
salasi
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Well, the site distrowatch inckudes the information on which kernel version a distro was released with in its summary information....but, that doesn't completely fulfil your requirements.

By the way, I can't really see any situation in which having the information which you are asking for would actually help. Maybe you would like to explain your situation further.
 
Old 12-22-2010, 04:20 AM   #3
password636
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OK. I need to do tests on many Linux Distributions, such as RHEL, Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora, etc.
As you know, each of the above distributions has updates from time to time, which results in something like RHEL5U1, RHEL5U2, and Debian50r3.
I also need to include these update edition into my scope.

And the most important thing is the kernels used by each edition. For example, RHEL maybe has 2.x kernel with its FCS release, but later the FCS release can use 2.y or 2.x-z kernels. Since I need to test RHEL FCS release, I also need to cover all the kernels it uses.

I think I make myself clear.
 
Old 12-22-2010, 04:32 AM   #4
i92guboj
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Quote:
Originally Posted by password636 View Post
Hi

Take Red Hat Enterprise Linux for example, it has U1 to U5 editions, and each edition supported several kernels, like U5 supported 2.6.18-194.el5PAE, 2.6.18-194.el5xen and 2.6.18-194.el5.

How can I know all the kernels supported by each edition of various Linux distribution? Like all the kernels supported by Red Hat Enterprise Linux U3 or Debian 5.0, or SUSE 11. Is there any websites providing such information or I have to log in their official site to look for? And how can I be kept posted with such information?

THANKS!
Looking at the official package repository for each distro.

There's no site that I know of that tracks this kind of information. You could probably hack some bash or perl script that reads the listing via ftp or http from several distro sites and present you with a nice list. That shouldn't be too difficult as long as you are willing to maintain the distro repository URLs by hand, each time a new one needs to be added (or modified).

Quote:
Originally Posted by password636 View Post
OK. I need to do tests on many Linux Distributions, such as RHEL, Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora, etc.
As you know, each of the above distributions has updates from time to time, which results in something like RHEL5U1, RHEL5U2, and Debian50r3.
I also need to include these update edition into my scope.

And the most important thing is the kernels used by each edition. For example, RHEL maybe has 2.x kernel with its FCS release, but later the FCS release can use 2.y or 2.x-z kernels. Since I need to test RHEL FCS release, I also need to cover all the kernels it uses.

I think I make myself clear.
To keep the list up-to-date once you have the right tool shouldn't be difficult. There are a million ways to implement this. You could collect the data from your own web site and parse it using perl or php, or you could just roll a script as said above and run it periodically for your own use, either by hand or using cron...
 
Old 12-22-2010, 04:37 AM   #5
salasi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by password636 View Post
OK. I need to do tests on many Linux Distributions, such as RHEL, Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora, etc.
As you know, each of the above distributions has updates from time to time, which results in something like RHEL5U1, RHEL5U2, and Debian50r3.
I also need to include these update edition into my scope.

And the most important thing is the kernels used by each edition. For example, RHEL maybe has 2.x kernel with its FCS release, but later the FCS release can use 2.y or 2.x-z kernels. Since I need to test RHEL FCS release, I also need to cover all the kernels it uses.

I think I make myself clear.
The problem that you may have is if you think that the stated kernel number is meaningful (ie, can be compared across versions, rather than being just an arbitrary number that identifies a thing).

RHEL is probably the clearest example (and it doesn't apply to some others): the number probably can be compared with other distros, more or less, when the release process initially starts, but that kernel is out in the real world (and supported) for ~5 years and the major and sub-number doesn't change, but the trailing ident does get incremented. This is as security fixes get backported over that time, so what starts off as, say, a 2.6.18 kernel with a few minor mods, may end up as a 2.6.18 kernel with all of the security stuff that has gone into a 2.6.34 (or something) kernel in the intervening period.

So is that really a 2.6.34 kernel? Well, no, but it isn't really a 2.6.18 either, at least in comparison to what the rest of the world considers those numbers to mean.
 
Old 12-22-2010, 08:49 AM   #6
Mr. Alex
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