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Old 06-28-2012, 02:58 PM   #1
unkn(0)wn
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How to install Slackware Linux version 13.37 64-bit on my Laptop.


Hello everyone,

I am currently using Ubuntu 12.04 LTS 64-bit along with Windows 7 64-bit on laptop of following configuration.

Intel core i5 460M (Core 2 Thread 4)
4 GB DDR3
Intel(R) HD Graphics and Nvidia Geforce GT 420M

Well i wish to completely roll over to Ubuntu. Thats why i was searching a STABLE Linux Distro and found Slackware. But before completely switching to Slackware i wish to try it by installing it along Windows.

My personal experience with Ubuntu are not too good so i tried replacing it with Slackware by my own but installation seems harder than i thought.

So i first want to ask that if my laptop is able to handle Slackware to its full performance?
And if yes, then how to install?

PS: I tried many online tutorial but they doesn't seem good in explaining.

Last edited by unkn(0)wn; 06-28-2012 at 03:01 PM.
 
Old 06-28-2012, 03:36 PM   #2
TroN-0074
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O.k, so I dont know how to put this, here is my try.

# 1. I dont want to discorage you from using SlackWare, because it is a great Operating System. However the installation along side of windows will probably give you some headaches so make sure you have a windows backup CD or DVD incase you have to re install it. and back up all your important files too.

Usually the first few slackware installations are thrown away installations. That is base on my own experience so for you probrably and hopefully will be different.

#2 If you are just looking for a stable Operating System to run along with Windows why dont you try Debian? Debian is Ubuntu's Dad and it is very stable, like SlackWare and the installation tool is a little bit easier. Easier installation because is semi graphical and not all text base.

Ofcourse the two distros are very different but they both are rock solid.
If you still want to try to install slackware here is the instructions on the SlackBook.

http://www.slackbook.org/beta/#id354537

Chapter 2 is installation good luck to you. And yes your laptop will handle slackware very well.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 06-28-2012, 03:46 PM   #3
honeybadger
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Yep - you have to read _carefully_ to understand what exactly you are doing. Slackware does not get in your way - ot willlet you do anything you want to (including shooting yourself in the foot). Installation is a breeze though. If you can tell us where exactly you are stuck then maybe we can help.
 
Old 06-28-2012, 03:49 PM   #4
Didier Spaier
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Hello,

First answer: yes, absolutely, your laptop is able to handle Slackware to its full performance.

Now for installing Slackware, to be able to give you precise guidance please give us some more information:

1) How is your hard disk partitioned and what is each partition's usage and size, as of now? In addition, please post an output of 'cat /etc/fstab'.

2) Which partitions do you want to keep? I understand that you intend to keep Windows 7 but are ready to wipe out Unbuntu, is that right?

3) Please confirm that you can install from a DVD (otherwise it can be done through an USB key but a DVD install is slightly easier for a beginner). Do you already have Slackware 13.37 on a DVD? Or a local mirror of Slackware 13.37?

Waiting for your answers,

PS Don't worry, installing Slackware alongside Windows 7 is not difficult at all, that's my setup and I am ready to give you detailed instructions

Last edited by Didier Spaier; 06-28-2012 at 03:52 PM.
 
Old 06-28-2012, 04:03 PM   #5
Alchemikos
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It's easy, do you will stay with the ubuntu too?

Begin working on partition using the seven, do your backups, defrag the partition with defraggler piriform. Merge all ubuntu partitions, format them, make a new partition in NTFS without letter name i,e "E" or "F" with the easeus partition master. after all boot by cd/dvd/USB the Slack image and make the swap and linux partition using the cfdisk. Install FULL instalation for now, its very easy, there a number of videos explaining the slack setup from the boot to the end installation .

But it's more easy make the partition before.

Alchemikos

---------- Post added 06-28-12 at 06:03 PM ----------

It's easy, do you will stay with the ubuntu too?

Begin working on partition using the seven, do your backups, defrag the partition with defraggler piriform. Merge all ubuntu partitions, format them, make a new partition in NTFS without letter name i,e "E" or "F" with the easeus partition master. after all boot by cd/dvd/USB the Slack image and make the swap and linux partition using the cfdisk. Install FULL instalation for now, its very easy, there a number of videos explaining the slack setup from the boot to the end installation .

But it's more easy make the partition before.

Alchemikos
 
Old 06-28-2012, 04:08 PM   #6
Didier Spaier
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@Alchemikos: no offense intended, but I don't think that this very terse "how to" be neither understandable by a beginner nor advisable.
 
Old 06-28-2012, 04:16 PM   #7
Alchemikos
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Yea Didier Spaier, you're right...

But just some keyactions could bring some insight to the Buddy research...

Like partition before, using windows. Preparing the field to the Slack
 
Old 06-28-2012, 04:29 PM   #8
Didier Spaier
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Wait for the answers from the original poster.

Till then my guess (only a guess, I admit) is that it will be possible to simply re use Ubuntu's partitions to install Slackware. If I am right there is no need to drop/create/re size any partition. And would it be necessary, gparted is the right tool for that, so the OP would have nothing to do with Windows 7, but make a de-fragmentation (with Windows 7 own utility) to prepare for a resizing of a NTFS partition - again, only if we need to do that, which I doubt of.
 
Old 06-28-2012, 04:51 PM   #9
unkn(0)wn
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Thanks,

TroN-0074 , Well i succeeded in installing Slackware on VMware Workstation using this link http://www.bnetweb.org/how-to/instal...on-virtualbox/ . However i googled your opinions and found Debian is really known for its rock solid stability. I'll like to give it a try on VMware first. And your link gave what i needed, explanation.

Didier Spaier, I'll be using USB for installation. I'll use "universal usb installer"(Trusted&Tested) to copy installation files to USB. Yes, I'll be installing in Ubuntu's ext4 partition of 25gb after formatting.

My doubts are,
1. While i'll using usb. My computer will assign "sdb" or something to my USB drive. So "fdisk -l" will tell my HDD name and for rest i'll be using "cfdisk". Will it show my all partitions list ?

2. What is frame buffer console ? If it is my screen resolution ?
 
Old 06-28-2012, 05:05 PM   #10
guyonearth
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I'm not sure why you're fixated on Slackware, which, while it may be a good Linux distro, lacks a lot of features others have, like integrated package management and a software center. Slackware is really for experts who want to customize a system and do it the "hard way". Assuming you're using the same kind of desktop, Slackware will not be any faster than Ubuntu. If you want a super stable Linux, look at Debian stable or Scientific, or CentOS. (Though I have not found Ubuntu unstable at all.) Slackware is fairly difficult to set up as a multiboot system, as it lacks the features to do this automatically.
 
Old 06-28-2012, 05:11 PM   #11
unkn(0)wn
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@guysonearth : i do not seek pre loaded programs on distro. And i am not stuck at Slackware. I search for most stable distros and found many as debian, slackware, fedora, opensuse, archlinux. I am just giving it a try.

By the way, i found my solution , few good links (above). And i think i have to give other distros a try before using Slackware.

Thanks to all!

Last edited by unkn(0)wn; 06-28-2012 at 05:16 PM.
 
Old 06-28-2012, 05:17 PM   #12
Didier Spaier
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If you want to use USB for installation, just read this.

When the installer will have been launched you will be able to login as root without password and both fdisk -l and cfdisk will show you partitions list accurately.

A frame buffer console is a way of displaying text in console mode (not GUI) with a high resolution. That's not a must, you can live without it.

I suggest you read this document which, though very slightly outdated, will give you a broad understanding of the installation process.

See you tomorrow.
 
  


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