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Old 11-04-2006, 01:06 AM   #1
iamez
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How to get stared with Linux.


I have used a standalone CD version of Linux. It needs a FAT32 partition to save data. I have an NTFS partition. I am looking to have a dual boot machine.

I posted this to Myway tech boards. I was referred to this site.

"I am ready to switch to Linux. Please help me decide which distro to obtain. I have been searching google all afternoon. There is more there than I can handle. I have some questions I need answered.

  1. What distro should I get?
  2. Can Linux be installed on NTFS partitions, or will I have to change to FAT32?
  3. Should I download and burn CDs or order them from the site? I am retired and money is tight."
EZ

Last edited by iamez; 11-04-2006 at 01:12 AM.
 
Old 11-04-2006, 01:12 AM   #2
Nylex
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iamez
  1. What distro should I get?
  2. Can Linux be installed on NTFS partitions, or will I have to change to FAT32?
  3. Should I download and burn CDs or order them from the site? I am retired and money is tight."
EZ
First of all, you've posted this in the wrong place. Not to worry though, a moderator will move it to the correct place. Just be a bit more careful in future.

1. Distros: if you do a search here, you'll find many threads asking the same thing. Lots of people are likely to recommend Ubuntu. Pick a distro you like the look of and try it. If you don't like it, try another. Repeat until you find one you like is my advice.

2. Linux has its own file systems, so you use those instead of FAT32 or NTFS. Linux can safely read and write to FAT32 and read NTFS partitions (write support for NTFS is there, but I think it's still experimental. Not certain on this though).

3. This is up to you. There's nothing wrong with downloading the ISOs and burning them, that's what they're there for .
 
Old 11-04-2006, 01:37 AM   #3
jschiwal
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Just to add to what Nylex said in his second point. The fat32 filesysten doesn't hold the ownership or permissions that Linux uses.
 
Old 11-04-2006, 02:01 AM   #4
syg00
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Best bet is to find some free space to install into - that means space not allocated to any partition, not free space within an already allocated partition.
In need, delete any partitions you no longer need.
Let the installer sort things out - minimum 5-10 Gig probably.

I also vote for Ubuntu for new users - it works, and works well. If you are concered about downloads (say if you have a limited ISP plan), they will even send you CDs for nothing. Go to www.ubuntu.com, and click on shipit.

Edit: Forgot to mention, ext3 is fine as a (journalled) Linux filesystem. Well tested and robust.

Last edited by syg00; 11-04-2006 at 02:04 AM.
 
Old 11-04-2006, 07:28 AM   #5
Samotnik
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1. Some novice-friendly distro, like Ubuntu, SuSE, Mandriva. But if you really want to know what's going on in your system and you don't afraid to read a tons of documentation - than welcome to Debian community!
2. Linux can be installed to FAT partition (theoretically), but this is such a bogus. There are ReiserFS, XFS and native ext3 filesystems to use.
3. Linux is distributed under GNU General Public Licence which grants you permissions to freely use, copy and distribute software. You can download Linux, take it from your friend, etc.
 
Old 11-04-2006, 08:30 AM   #6
2damncommon
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Quote:
3. Should I download and burn CDs or order them from the site? I am retired and money is tight.
You can ask to have a free CD sent to you from Ubuntu:
http://www.ubuntu.com/
 
Old 11-08-2006, 04:02 PM   #7
iamez
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Thanks for all of the advise. I have obtained five live CD distros. I will spend the next couple of months evaluating each of the distros.

I have a 4.9 GB NTFS partition on my hard drive. Is that large enough for installation? D drive was partitioned from the C drive. If I delete the partition won't the free space just revert back to part of C:? I used partition magic to create and format the partitions.


EZ
 
Old 11-08-2006, 04:10 PM   #8
pixellany
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iamez
Thanks for all of the advise. I have obtained five live CD distros. I will spend the next couple of months evaluating each of the distros.
Good Grief!!!--I'll bet you can pick one faster than that....

Quote:
Originally Posted by iamez
I have a 4.9 GB NTFS partition on my hard drive. Is that large enough for installation? D drive was partitioned from the C drive. If I delete the partition won't the free space just revert back to part of C:? I used partition magic to create and format the partitions.
EZ
In Linux, there are no "C" or "D" drives---be prepared for new nomeclature. (This will not be an issue running "LIVE", and--when you do install--it will become obvious.)
You can't do this exactly as you stated:
Quote:
D drive was partitioned from the C drive.
. first, you delete a partition and then you create a new one using the empty space. When you delete a partition, the free space does not revert anywhere.
When you install, the installer will take care of the partitioning. 4.9GB will be marginal, but will work.
(Also, Linux uses its own filesystems--not NTFS.)
What is the total disk size, size of the Windows drive, etc.?
 
  


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