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Old 04-13-2011, 04:53 PM   #1
Ribo01
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how to check availabe commands in terminal ?


Hello y'all, i don't know if there is a way to check or see the list of commands available to each shell you decide to use, be it BASH,KSH, etc in your terminal. You know how its works in microsoft, in cmd-line or dos, you type HELP and its brings all the commands available for use. Hope you understand. Distro Red Hat.

Last edited by Ribo01; 04-13-2011 at 04:56 PM.
 
Old 04-13-2011, 05:01 PM   #2
sibe
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You mean, ALL commands available?
IMO, shell is more than just a collection of commands, and not all commands belong to a shell. Anyway, you could type a[TAB][TAB] and see what shows up, then b[TAB][TAB], c[TAB][TAB], and so on until you're running out of alphabets.


----
sibe
 
Old 04-13-2011, 05:04 PM   #3
Didier Spaier
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Well, it's hard to answer your question because commands available in a shell fall into several categories:
- commands internal to the shell (builtin commands)
- utilities often associated to the shell but not included in it
- any other program which be launched through the shell

For the builtin commands, type "man <shell name>", e.g. "man bash". Beware, that's a lot of reading

Other than that, for Red Hat you could look here for instance (not sure it is up to date, though): http://www.mediacollege.com/linux/co...x-command.html

Last edited by Didier Spaier; 04-14-2011 at 10:04 AM.
 
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Old 04-13-2011, 05:06 PM   #4
knudfl
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bash http://ss64.com/bash/

csh http://docstore.mik.ua/orelly/linux/lnut/ch08_09.htm
http://www.mkssoftware.com/docs/man1/csh.1.asp

ksh http://www.regatta.cmc.msu.ru/doc/us...xcmds3/ksh.htm
 
Old 04-13-2011, 06:45 PM   #5
CFet
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ribo01 View Post
Hello y'all, i don't know if there is a way to check or see the list of commands available to each shell you decide to use, be it BASH,KSH, etc in your terminal. You know how its works in microsoft, in cmd-line or dos, you type HELP and its brings all the commands available for use. Hope you understand. Distro Red Hat.
Hey Ribo,

If you want a handy command "cheat sheet", you can use one of these wallpapers for your desktop, then they're right there when you need them. In graphical desktop environments of course.

Handy Dandy Command Wallpapers

Cheers!
Chris
 
Old 04-13-2011, 08:14 PM   #6
chrism01
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http://linux.die.net/man/

NB: The first part of post #3 (cmd classifications) is important; people use the phrase 'shell cmd' very loosely.

http://rute.2038bug.com/index.html.gz
http://tldp.org/LDP/Bash-Beginners-G...tml/index.html
http://www.tldp.org/LDP/abs/html/

The last 2 there cover pretty much all the 'shell' cmds, especially the built-ins and usual env variables.
Enjoy
 
Old 04-13-2011, 08:38 PM   #7
Telengard
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As mentioned there are shell built-ins (also called internal commands), and then there are external commands. Shell built-ins are part of the shell itself. External commands are programs unto themselves and exist separately from the shell.

All the Bash built-ins are documented in The Bash Reference Manual. External commands are documented in their various man pages and info documentation.

Also see the documentation for your own distro. Every distro does things a little different.
 
  


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