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Old 07-11-2014, 04:12 AM   #1
supriyak
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how to become expert in linux


hii..i am a beginner of linux mint..i learned and practiced linux basic commands..so now what should i do after basic commands? thank you.
 
Old 07-11-2014, 05:03 AM   #2
keefaz
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Hmm, what expert does mean ? To me it's about experience that helps solve problem

Maybe consider trying kernel compilation depending on your goal
 
Old 07-11-2014, 05:04 AM   #3
EDDY1
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Install it to a virtual machine & see what you can really do with it. The reason that I say VM is because if you break it, it won't hurt so much. But if you xo break it you can learn how to fix it.
 
Old 07-11-2014, 06:06 AM   #4
keefaz
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Wink

Quote:
Originally Posted by EDDY1 View Post
Install it to a virtual machine
Pfff, lemming!
 
Old 07-11-2014, 06:34 AM   #5
brianL
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I'm not an expert, so I can only guess: the same way you become an expert in anything. Practice, read about it and use it. Common sense, really. There's loads of online docs about Linux. Websearch: learning linux.
 
Old 07-11-2014, 06:41 AM   #6
johnsfine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by supriyak View Post
i learned and practiced linux basic commands..so now what should i do after basic commands?
A big part of being an expert in Linux (and a part I haven't mastered myself) is being an expert in bash scripting.

A lot of bash scripts implement key parts of the system, especially startup. Those parts are among the least documented and the most important to understand on the way to becoming a Linux expert.

Programs coded in C often have detailed documentation of their behavior, because those writing the documentation expect non programmers to need to know that behavior.

But important programs coded in bash typically have no real documentation of their behavior. If you need to understand their behavior you need to be a good enough bash programmer to read the script as if it were "self documenting".

So go through some advanced tutorial in bash scripting, then try to understand some of the scripts involved in startup of your distribution.
 
Old 07-11-2014, 06:42 AM   #7
pan64
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as a measurement you can try to solve problems here, at LQ.
 
Old 07-11-2014, 04:49 PM   #8
jefro
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A person who masters linux may never consider themselves an expert. By the time you learn enough where you might want to say you are an expert, you find you have not mastered it all.

If you are brave and have time, I'd suggest you try Linux From Scratch(LFS). It is a great way to learn nuts and bolts of linux.

If you want you can branch out to any distro and learn it. Some of the commercial ones have all sorts of documentation, books and schools.

If you want you can move on to writing apps for linux in any of maybe 100 different programming languages.

If you wish you may want to learn how to create a driver for a device in linux.

The field of linux contains much more than just a shell and simple commands. In fact, there are many different shells than bash and each has unique features.
 
Old 07-11-2014, 05:27 PM   #9
EDDY1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by keefaz View Post
Pfff, lemming!
Is this just disagreement?
Also the only thing I can find on lemming is rodent.
Anyway I believe that everyone would like to understand what you actually mean as anything stated in forum should be helpful to the OP & others!
 
Old 07-11-2014, 06:25 PM   #10
keefaz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EDDY1 View Post
Is this just disagreement?
Hey, was just kidding. The idea to try commands in a virtual box is good of course. But then you don't have the pressure, the stress than working in a real system where damages are real and lessons taken by heart
 
Old 07-11-2014, 06:32 PM   #11
Firerat
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I think it is 10,000 hours 'working' on/with/at ... to be considered an Expert.

Basically practice ,

as with anything else, set targets/goals, achieve and go onward..

Seems you are off to a good start, you already have Mint installed.

So ... Now you need a new goal. the best kind of goal is one you would enjoy.
So ... What do you enjoy doing in computing ?
. . Graphics? Audio? Video? Networking?

Books/music/movie/tv/media/'new'/socialmedia.. reading/writing/researching them?

Tell us what you would like/need.. so that we may guide you.


The virtual machine(VM) idea is great

Start simple and try VirtualBox,
assuming plenty of storage, create a 'VM' and install a distro

Challenge Mode:
See if you could find a way to 'clone' your existing install to run in the VM.
 
Old 07-11-2014, 07:16 PM   #12
joe_2000
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What are you interested in? Linux is really good at all sorts of networking related things. You may want to set up a server at home for backup purposes. Or maybe a webserver. Or play around with home automation. A Raspberry Pi is a very affordable option do do any of these things.

If you are more interested in the desktop experience go ahead and try out different distros and / or desktop environments. Customize your distro to a point where it behaves exactly the way you want. Play around with things, break your installation, and repair it again. Once you are comfortable with all the installation and set up tasks, start installing Linux on other people's computers.

Or set up a custom router using e.g. OpenWrt. It's quite interesting to have a Linux install running on your router which you can access through ssh, and it gives you a maximum of flexibility and configurability.

Play around with Debian Live-build to build your own custom iso image and put it on a flash drive for your key ring.

And and and... There are countless possibilities.
 
Old 07-11-2014, 08:34 PM   #13
basica
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I'm not an expert either, but here are memorable parts of my journey:

Back in the old days of ubuntu, you still had to edit config files via the terminal, in my case specifically it was to add mirrors. I remember how freaked out I was at the terminal following it closely, getting worried when I made a mistake and hit backspace and vi didn't delete the character (or so I thought) so I'd exit and try again. After that incident I learned more about vi/vim and I was more comfortable working with them and using them.

I was afraid of the command line in general, so along with learning vi/vim I got myself a copy of a beginner's guide at TLDP and followed it all the way through. I learned about the filesystem, package managers and just got more comfortable with the command line in general

I also started playing around with distros and a lot of them at the time involved partitioning the filesystem yourself so I eventually got over my fear of cfdisk and was able to partition my drive fine. When I started installing more software I had to follow all sorts of guides and these guides eventually got me use to grep/sed/awk. Lastly, when I started getting interesting in hosting stuff online and having a wordpress blog I got more familiar with logs to find problems.

I'm at the point now that I can get by in most distros, if instructions aren't holding my way all the way through I'm not terribly worried most of the time. With the help on Google I am mostly self sufficient, but every now and again I still need help and I'm sure most people here do too.
 
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Old 07-11-2014, 08:51 PM   #14
${i}
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Quote:
Originally Posted by supriyak View Post
hii..i am a beginner of linux mint..i learned and practiced linux basic commands..so now what should i do after basic commands? thank you.
It's a worthwhile goal to be an expert in linux, but linux is ever changing from the kernel to comands. What you learn today could be obsolete tomorrow.

My journey with linux started with the commands and then shell scripting. From there you can try learning other programming languages like python for example, or practice setting up servers.

Another option to to deliberately break things in linux and see the effects of it and remedy it.

Welcome to LQ!
 
Old 07-11-2014, 09:28 PM   #15
frankbell
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Quote:
as a measurement you can try to solve problems here, at LQ.
This is an excellent suggestion. Trying to help others is a great way to learn. Testing out your proposed answers before you post them will force you to try new stuff.

My suggestion is to pick something you want to do and learn how to do it with Linux. You will learn as you go along. With me, it was self-hosting my website, which I did with Slackware and a lampp stack--I self-hosted for almost five years, until I moved to these parts, where my new ISP is actively hostile to public-facing servers and blocks port 80 (I know there are workarounds, but it wasn't worth the trouble).

In the process of doing that, I learned how to use text editors, simple file and directory navigation commands, and lots of other stuff. It really doesn't matter what it is, as long as it has you using a Linux computer; you will have to learn Linux stuff along the way. Then pick another something, then another something, and so on.
 
  


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