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Old 07-13-2010, 12:22 AM   #1
Arty Ziff
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How to add SUDO access?


How do I give a regular user account sudo access?

I'm using CentOSv5 (essentially Red Hat Enterprise 5).

THANKS!
 
Old 07-13-2010, 12:25 AM   #2
paulsm4
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As "root", edit the /etc/sudoers file. Simple as that

Here's a bit more detail, should you wish to take advantage of other special features:

http://www.centos.org/modules/newbb/...&viewmode=flat

http://aplawrence.com/Basics/sudo.html

Last edited by paulsm4; 07-13-2010 at 12:28 AM.
 
Old 07-13-2010, 01:30 AM   #3
subho.d
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Hi ;
Edit this file /etc/sudoers
 
Old 07-13-2010, 01:34 AM   #4
digsecurity
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echo 'username ALL=(ALL) ALL' >> /etc/sudoers ##As root
 
Old 07-13-2010, 03:58 AM   #5
omersattar
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Use visudo recommended way to edit /etc/sudoers

you should use "visudo" command which is the recommended way to edit /etc/sudoers . Examples are given inside the file so you can easily add users and give them rights to execute some/all commands as root.
Also you can enable log of commands executed via sudo.
 
Old 07-13-2010, 04:08 AM   #6
alli_yas
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In addition to previous posters; make sure to BACKUP your sudoers file before making changes. Its good practice for any configuration file; and specifically to this one; making a mistake can result in you having to rescue the OS or even worse completely reinstalling.
 
Old 07-13-2010, 07:37 AM   #7
er.surendersharma
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arty Ziff View Post
How do I give a regular user account sudo access?

I'm using CentOSv5 (essentially Red Hat Enterprise 5).

THANKS!
you should use "visudo" command which is the recommended way to edit /etc/sudoers .
 
Old 07-13-2010, 12:58 PM   #8
RockDoctor
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As have mentioned above, use visudo.
 
Old 07-13-2010, 05:27 PM   #9
DavidMcCann
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The reason for using visudo is that it will check the result of your edit before saving the file, and warn you if you've made a mistake. If you don't like vi, you can ensure visudo uses an editor of your choice by first using the command "EDITOR=nano" (or whatever).
 
Old 07-13-2010, 06:05 PM   #10
smeezekitty
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change /etc/sudoers but make and verify a backup first.
 
Old 07-15-2010, 12:26 AM   #11
Arty Ziff
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I understand the advantages of using something like visudo, but is there any reason why I *should not* simply edit /etc/sudoers:
Quote:
## Allow root to run any commands anywhere
root ALL=(ALL) ALL
to look like:
Quote:
## Allow root to run any commands anywhere
root ALL=(ALL) ALL
SomeUser ALL=(ALL) ALL
???

Also, when I execute "visudo" at the command line, all that happens is that /etc/sudoers opens in my text editor anyway...

Last edited by Arty Ziff; 07-15-2010 at 12:29 AM.
 
Old 07-15-2010, 01:33 AM   #12
jschiwal
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Read through your /etc/sudoers file and review the pam configuration for su and sudo if any. Also look through your installation manuals Security and Authentication section. E.g.: http://www.redhat.com/docs/en-US/Red...ment_Guide.pdf

It may be configured with both sudoers and pam such that you should add a user to the %wheel group.
 
  


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