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Old 04-16-2014, 03:40 AM   #1
hoolo
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Registered: Apr 2014
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How i access my sencond HDD?


I rented a dedicated server with two HDDs, but i have no idea how do i access the second HDD to simply check its contents or any other kind of operation.

lsblk -f

Code:
NAME    FSTYPE            LABEL        MOUNTPOINT
sda
├─sda1  linux_raid_member dc89999999:0
│ └─md0 ext4                           /boot
├─sda2  linux_raid_member dc89999999:2
│ └─md2 swap                           [SWAP]
└─sda3  linux_raid_member dc89999999:1
  └─md1 ext4                           /
sdb
├─sdb1  linux_raid_member dc89999999:0
│ └─md0 ext4                           /boot
├─sdb2  linux_raid_member dc89999999:2
│ └─md2 swap                           [SWAP]
└─sdb3  linux_raid_member dc89999999:1
  └─md1 ext4                           /
That's the output of fdisk -l ( pated -l next )
Code:
Disk identifier: 0x000a817a

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sdb1   *        2048      499711      248832   fd  Linux raid autodetect
/dev/sdb2      3891030016  3907028991     7999488   fd  Linux raid autodetect
/dev/sdb3          499712  3891030015  1945265152   fd  Linux raid autodetect

Partition table entries are not in disk order

Disk /dev/md0: 254 MB, 254607360 bytes
2 heads, 4 sectors/track, 62160 cylinders, total 497280 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00000000

Disk /dev/md0 doesn't contain a valid partition table

Disk /dev/md2: 8187 MB, 8187215872 bytes
2 heads, 4 sectors/track, 1998832 cylinders, total 15990656 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00000000

Disk /dev/md2 doesn't contain a valid partition table

Disk /dev/md1: 1991.8 GB, 1991817101312 bytes
2 heads, 4 sectors/track, 486283472 cylinders, total 3890267776 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00000000

Disk /dev/md1 doesn't contain a valid partition table
Output from parted -l

Code:
Model: ATA TOSHIBA DT01ACA2 (scsi)
Disk /dev/sda: 2000GB
Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/4096B
Partition Table: msdos

Number  Start   End     Size    Type     File system     Flags
 1      1049kB  256MB   255MB   primary  ext4            boot, raid
 3      256MB   1992GB  1992GB  primary  ext4            raid
 2      1992GB  2000GB  8191MB  primary  linux-swap(v1)  raid


Model: ATA TOSHIBA DT01ACA2 (scsi)
Disk /dev/sdb: 2000GB
Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/4096B
Partition Table: msdos

Number  Start   End     Size    Type     File system     Flags
 1      1049kB  256MB   255MB   primary  ext4            boot, raid
 3      256MB   1992GB  1992GB  primary  ext4            raid
 2      1992GB  2000GB  8191MB  primary  linux-swap(v1)  raid


Model: Linux Software RAID Array (md)
Disk /dev/md0: 255MB
Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/4096B
Partition Table: loop

Number  Start  End    Size   File system  Flags
 1      0.00B  255MB  255MB  ext4


Model: Linux Software RAID Array (md)
Disk /dev/md1: 1992GB
Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/4096B
Partition Table: loop

Number  Start  End     Size    File system  Flags
 1      0.00B  1992GB  1992GB  ext4


Model: Linux Software RAID Array (md)
Disk /dev/md2: 8187MB
Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/4096B
Partition Table: loop

Number  Start  End     Size    File system     Flags
 1      0.00B  8187MB  8187MB  linux-swap(v1)

Last edited by hoolo; 04-16-2014 at 03:47 AM.
 
Old 04-16-2014, 04:00 AM   #2
evo2
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Hi,

from what you have posted the two disks have been put in a raid1 array. As such you don't access each individual drive, instead they are paired together to provide redundancy and other raid1 features.

Cheers,

Evo2.
 
Old 04-16-2014, 06:11 AM   #3
hoolo
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Registered: Apr 2014
Posts: 2

Original Poster
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Sorry, i don't understand well the RAID concept. So it is like i have only one HDD? If i wipe one drive, that other one will be wiped too?
 
Old 04-16-2014, 07:37 AM   #4
chrism01
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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standard_RAID_levels
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RAID
 
Old 04-16-2014, 07:39 AM   #5
10i
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How i access my sencond HDD?

dont wipe, the one is a backup of the other in raid one.

raid - redundant array, meaning for backups
 
Old 04-16-2014, 11:28 AM   #6
Soadyheid
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Distribution: Cinnamon Mint 17.0 at present.
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It's for hardware redundancy... When you write data to your RAID 1 volume, you write to both drives, also known as a root and mirror drive. Should you have a drive failure, head crash, whatever, your data is safe as you can boot from the alternate drive.

A faulty drive would be replaced and would rebuild its self automatically from the good drive. RAIDs can be implemented in either hardware or software. Hardware raids can usually have faulty drives hot swapped, they handle the rebuild transparently, the OS isn't used for this task, the RAID controller card does it.

Yes, if you wipe one, you wipe both. RAID volumes are 'initialised' rather than 'wiped' if you need to start again.
n.b. a RAID 'volume' is a collection of drives.

For more info on RAID, see:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standard_RAID_levels

Play Bonny!

 
  


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