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Old 08-31-2004, 02:59 PM   #1
akilhoffer
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How do I set default in GNU GRUB?


I'm using Fedora Core 2, which uses GNU GRUB by default as my "boot loader??". I recently updated my kernel from version 2.6.5-1.358 to 2.6.8-1.521. When GRUB displays, the older of the two versions is highlighted by default and is chosed if I dont catch it in time. How can I set the newer version to be the default? Also, can I remove the older entry all together, or is this not a good idea? Thanks in advance!

-Tony
 
Old 08-31-2004, 03:07 PM   #2
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Not sure how FC uses grub, under debian there's
a file called
/boot/grub/menu.lst

It holds an entry called default :}
Change its setting.


Cheers,
Tink
 
Old 08-31-2004, 03:07 PM   #3
m_yates
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Edit /boot/grub/menu.lst You should see a line that starts with "default" In mine, it is "default 0" Where the number 0 referes to the first entry in the list of kernel images. Numbering starts with zero, so if you want the default to be the second entry, put "default 1".

If everything is working with your new kernel, there is no problem deleting it from the menu.lst file, or even deleting the kernel image from your system.
 
Old 08-31-2004, 04:33 PM   #4
akilhoffer
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Cool. I've edited the menu.lst file and changed default to 0. I also commented out the older kernel entry so only the newest one is shown in the menu.

You mentioned that I could safely delete the old kernel from my system if the new version is running well. It's running very well, in fact. Just one question....how do I go about doing this? I certainly dont want to screw it up! Thanks in advance for your help, guys! You all kick ass!
 
Old 08-31-2004, 04:51 PM   #5
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Well ... you'd want to remove the vmlinuz-file that
corresponds to the old kernel (either lives in / or
/boot) and the corresponding modules. Those are
in /lib/modules/<kernel-version-mumble>, and
rm -rf /lib/modules/<kernel-version-mumble> should
fix that waste of space ;}


Cheers,
Tink
 
Old 08-31-2004, 04:53 PM   #6
m_yates
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You don't have to remove it if you don't want to. It doesn't take up that much space.

If you do want to remove it:
Code:
cd /lib/modules
rm -rf 2.6.5-1
You should have the modules for the old kernel somewhere here. The directory will be named after the kernel. I'm assuming that the name is 2.6.5-1. BE CAREFUL! You don't want to delete the modules for the kernel you are using.

You can also remove the old kernel image:
Code:
cd /boot
rm vmlinuz-2.6.5-1
Once again, I am assuming that it is vmlinuz-2.6.5-1. It is the name of the image referenced in your menu.lst.

If you have the old kernel source, you can remove it too:
Code:
cd /usr/src
rm -rf kernel-source-2.6.5-1
I'm assuming the directory is called kernel-source-2.6.5-1

I may be forgetting some things. I use Debian, and to remove a Debian kernel I would just have to type:
Code:
dpkg -P kernel-image-2.6.5-1
to purge all the files installed with the old kernel. Unfortunately, Fedora doesn't use dpkg.
 
Old 08-31-2004, 05:09 PM   #7
akilhoffer
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It certainly is easier with Debian. BTW, I'm still just playing around with Linux, trying to learn it. I havent decided what distro to go with yet. Do you think Debian is a better distro? One of the reasons why I went with Fedora is because Mandrake 10 wouldnt run on my laptop. At least, no WM would. No video support for my ThinkPad T23. Anyway, is Debian better in your opinion? How is it's hardware support? Fedora installed soooo easily compared to other distros. Thoughts?
 
Old 08-31-2004, 05:17 PM   #8
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What video-adapter has that thing got, or what is its
IBM 7-digit part-number? :)

I'd go with Slack (obviously), debian would be my
next choice ;}


Cheers,
Tink
 
Old 08-31-2004, 05:35 PM   #9
akilhoffer
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It's 2647-3MU. You really think Slack is the way to go? For what reasons? Thanks!
 
Old 08-31-2004, 07:39 PM   #10
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What can I say? I had been using Linux (mainly
SuSE) for quite a while before I came across
Slack, but I have learnt more (and faster) in 2
years of Slack than in 4 years of SuSE and
Mandreck :) ... slack is minimalistic, has very
simple basic concepts that are easy to grasp,
and forces you to have full control over the
system by it's utter lack of gadgets. The simplicity
allows you to reasonably easily follow the flow
of control if something goes wrong, there's no
yasts or draks concealing the inner works.

You'll get software installed, it will provide you
with X using VESA, if your NIC is common will
help you set-up a network, set-up sendmail for
local mail delivery, create ssh-keys and then the
adventure begins.

Amen :)


As for the adapter: I'm afraid that there's no
freely available accelerated drivers. But if you
don't need to play games with high FPS on the
box VESA should be just fine in any distro :)


Cheers,
Tink
 
Old 08-31-2004, 08:07 PM   #11
akilhoffer
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Cool. Thank you so much for your input. I'm going to download a copy and play with it a bit. Again, thanks for everything. I'll be in touch...
 
Old 09-01-2004, 06:17 AM   #12
m_yates
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I've used Slackware too. I would agree that it forces you to learn things because you have to do lots of configuration by hand. My main reason for using Debian is because of apt and the huge software repository. Slackware has a similar tool called swaret and I'd suggest using it if you install Slackware. Swaret doesn't resolve dependencies or work as fast as apt though.

In addition, if you want an easy introduction to Debian, I highly recommend Libranet. The latest release is a free download now. Libranet gives you a 100% Debian compatible system, but adds some nice tools that make configuration easier (Libranet has "adminmenu" which is somewhat similar to Yast in Suse, or Mandrakes Control Center).
 
  


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