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Old 11-12-2004, 03:34 AM   #1
Joe Belmaati
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Registered: Nov 2004
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How do I save to XF86Config?


This is probably the most noobish question you will ever see. How do I save to the XF86Config file as root? I have tried to log in a root using su -l root, typed in my password and got a terminal window with root@localhost. Looks as if I am logged in as root. Then I need to make some changes in the XF86Config file, so I browse to it and open it with KWrite. Make my changes and now I can't save because I don't have sufficient privileges. So my question is: is there a specific procedure for opening the XF86Config file that will allow me to save to it?

Any help is much appreciated.
Sincerely,
Joe Belmaati
Copenhagen Denmark
 
Old 11-12-2004, 03:46 AM   #2
salparadise
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once you have logged in as root in a terminal
just type

kwrite /etc/X11/XF86Config

edit and save

this should work

You need to invoke the editor from the command line as root,
merely logging in as root on the command line and then using menu entries is not sufficient.

hope this helps
 
Old 11-12-2004, 03:47 AM   #3
linux_terror
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If you are logged into the gui as a non-priveleged user then that is why, you are root in the terminal only, and kwrite is running as whatever user the gui is running as. The way to go about doing what you want to do is to open a terminal and su, then type kwrite in the terminal that is running as root, now kwrite is running as root and you can edit XF86Config to your liking. Optionally you could also use vi to do the editing from a root prompt but vi is generally very confusing to less experienced users.
hope this helps, linux_terror
 
Old 11-12-2004, 03:48 AM   #4
linux_terror
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LOL, salparadise beat me to the punch...hehee

linux_terror
 
Old 11-12-2004, 05:43 AM   #5
Joe Belmaati
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Thank you very much!
 
  


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