LinuxQuestions.org
Register a domain and help support LQ
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices

Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 01-10-2009, 09:28 PM   #1
trivo_gurl
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jan 2009
Posts: 7

Rep: Reputation: 0
Unhappy How do I open .iso/.sh/.exe file extensions on linux?


Hi,

I've been using Windows since as long as I can remember. I just purchased an ASUS Eee PC 701SD that came with Linux. I'm hoping to switch to Linux, but I'm having a lot of trouble. For example, I don't know how to open anything in Linux. How do I open extensions like .iso and .sh? If I need to download a P2P client or VLC media player how do I do it? I don't even know what kind of Linux my PC uses!

I need help! And fast!

Much thanks!
trivo_gurl
 
Old 01-10-2009, 09:38 PM   #2
billymayday
Guru
 
Registered: Mar 2006
Location: Sydney, Australia
Distribution: Fedora, CentOS, OpenSuse, Slack, Gentoo, Debian, Arch, PCBSD
Posts: 6,678

Rep: Reputation: 122Reputation: 122
An iso is a disk image that you would normally write to a cd or dvd. A .sh is usually shell script that you run from a terminal session.

Does the eee have some form of package manager that lets you install applications?
 
Old 01-10-2009, 09:44 PM   #3
trivo_gurl
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jan 2009
Posts: 7

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
As far as I know, no it does not. I'm completely clueless as to how to open any sort of download files. Its enough to drive a person crazy!
 
Old 01-10-2009, 09:55 PM   #4
Uncle_Theodore
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2007
Location: Charleston WV, USA
Distribution: Slackware 12.2, Arch Linux Amd64
Posts: 896

Rep: Reputation: 60
Well, it depends on what you mean by opening a file. There's no need to open an iso, though you can mount it and see what's inside if you want. Usually, like the previous poster said, you just burn it as an image on a CD or DVD. A shell script is usually run. Open a terminal window and type something like

sh <filename>.sh

if you're really sure that it won't harm your system. Sometimes, to install something from a .sh script you need to be root.

.exe files are usually windows executables. To a certain extent, you can run then using the wine program.

Linux us quite well documented, you just need to get used to it. If I can handle it, anybody can. There's no need to get crazy. Good Luck.

Last edited by Uncle_Theodore; 01-10-2009 at 09:57 PM.
 
Old 01-10-2009, 10:21 PM   #5
trivo_gurl
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jan 2009
Posts: 7

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
I really hope I do get the hang of it, 'cause right now, I'm about ready to pull my hair out!

How in the world do I open a terminal window? How do I install wine in the first place if I can't open the downloaded file for it??
 
Old 01-10-2009, 10:38 PM   #6
Uncle_Theodore
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2007
Location: Charleston WV, USA
Distribution: Slackware 12.2, Arch Linux Amd64
Posts: 896

Rep: Reputation: 60
I'm not familiar with this machine. Did it have any documentation with it? I looked quickly in Google, there are some places where you can find information on Linux installed on your Eee PC. For example, this http://wiki.eeeuser.com/eee_pc_701 looks like a good place to start.
 
Old 01-10-2009, 11:37 PM   #7
okos
Member
 
Registered: May 2007
Location: California
Distribution: Slackware/Ubuntu
Posts: 609

Rep: Reputation: 37
I suggest to install ubuntu. I think it is the most popular distro and has great support. And remove the distro you currently have. Ubuntu is also easier to use then many other distros.

As a new user you will need support. Linux requires much more learning then microsoft.

You can download ubuntu iso. Burn it on cd as a iso/image.
Restart the computer and ubuntu will boot. Ubuntu will give you the option to install on your harddrive or run as a live cd. As a live cd you will be able to see what ubuntu is all about.
 
Old 01-11-2009, 12:03 AM   #8
trivo_gurl
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jan 2009
Posts: 7

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Can I install ubuntu using a USB key? For the ASUS Eee PC doesn't come with a CD drive and it would take me a while to get access to one of those. I tried installing an .iso ubuntu file using a USB key and the system said that the USB did not have "partition" to install the new system...
 
Old 01-11-2009, 12:41 AM   #9
okos
Member
 
Registered: May 2007
Location: California
Distribution: Slackware/Ubuntu
Posts: 609

Rep: Reputation: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by trivo_gurl View Post
Can I install ubuntu using a USB key? For the ASUS Eee PC doesn't come with a CD drive and it would take me a while to get access to one of those. I tried installing an .iso ubuntu file using a USB key and the system said that the USB did not have "partition" to install the new system...
Read this link
http://www.teamteabag.com/2008/05/17...tros-from-usb/

Ubuntu should overwrite whatever you currently have on your harddrive.

By far installing from cd is much easier. Perhaps invest in a usb cd/dvd burner?
 
Old 01-11-2009, 01:21 AM   #10
btmiller
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2004
Location: In the DC 'burbs
Distribution: Arch, Scientific Linux, Debian, Ubuntu
Posts: 4,111

Rep: Reputation: 312Reputation: 312Reputation: 312Reputation: 312
If you want to try Ubuntu, take a look at EEEbuntu, as it's a version of Linux specifically customized for the Asus Eee (which is a netbook and therefore doesn't have things like CD drives). I've played a bit with a friend's Eee 701, and I don't think the distro involved (a customized Xandros, IIRC) is all that hard to use (then again, I've got over 8 years of Linux experience, so maybe I'm not the best one to say ). But I'd suggest reading some of the documentation/hints over at EEEuser before deciding to make a swap. In particular, they have a very good wiki.
 
Old 01-26-2009, 04:41 AM   #11
mafiltenborg
Member
 
Registered: Jan 2004
Location: Denmark
Distribution: Debian, Debian, Debian
Posts: 81
Blog Entries: 3

Rep: Reputation: 19
trivo_gurl: Slow down!

Don't install Ubuntu or anything like that, hoping this will in some magical way clear the road. It won't!

Just stop right there.

You get to a terminal window by pressing keys Ctrl, Alt and T simultaneously. Which you could have found out by googling for "eeepc terminal".

To help you getting going with your eeepc (apart from the manuals), there's a website specifically for eeepc owners. There, they have all sorts of goodies, aimed at easing people into the linux-world as found on the eee. Go to http://www.eeeuser.com/.

Please: Go there, visit the forums, read the stickies/FAQ's and in general take your time to familiarize yourself with the device. The manufacturer has actually gone to great lenghts in order to set you up with a nice environment.

E.g., did you know your 701SD comes with a built-in return-to-start-function, designed to bring you back to square one in five minutes flat? I mean *built-in*, no usb-sticks or DVD-drives or anything needed!

Wanna know how? Well, it's in the manual
But chances are you don't need it. Anyways, it's an emergency-brake-thing, so don't use it casually!

Next thing: Your 701SD as delivered from Asus is NOT a 'full-blown PC' onto which you can just go ahead and install anything you happen to want to install. The preloaded software has nice GUI-tools providing access to a limited number of applications, targeting beginners and casual users.
Should you insist on doing everything, all the time, and preferably five minutes ago; be prepared to climb a steep learning curve! For starters, you will need to get access to tools and facilities AFAIK not included in the factory-made software. You'll need windows-emulators, compilers and dev-tools, repositories providing countless other tools and most importantly, you'll need knowledge on how to make use of these things.
This just doesn't happen overnight.

So my advice to you is to realize that the 701SD in its present state offers limited possibilities. And lots of newbie-fallback-security!! Not a bad thing at all.
This is actually a great platform for learning the basics of *nix computing, acquainting yourself with e.g. shell commands as offered by the factory shell. Are you familiar with ls, mkdir, rmdir, ln, cat, top, sudo, apt-get and other commandline-tools? How about the directory tree structure? The use of .conf and rc-files? Basic system management? Because you wanted a terminal window, so you're gonna need stuff like this in order to get productive. Within the boundaries of what the stock Xandros software package offers - which by the way is plenty for beginner usage.

The 701SD can do all the fancy stuff, trust me. I have one here (sadly not mine - i merely borrow it) that does Compiz/KDE 3D-whirling-boxes-desktops, wobbly windows, wardriving, fullblown C++-compiler, GUI IDE to go with that, link to 24000+ installable program packages and all the whizbang-geek-stuff imaginable. Really. But I didn't just do that. It took a month or so - and I've got 15 years of practice under my belt.

Your 701SD is no different. But go slowly.

Suggested course of actions:
* Figure out how to do factory reset using built-in tool (See manual)
* Get at the terminal (Ctrl-Alt-T) and learn basic commands for navigation etc.
* Create USB-stick with factory-reinstall-software (See the DVD + Manual).
* Test the USB-stick. When test is successful, store the USB-stick somewhere safe.
--- You are now able to rescue your 701 from all disasters ---
* Return to the terminal. Learn about apt, the Xandros repositories etc (www.eeeuser.com) and start pushing boundaries.
* Learn to create a small shell script to e.g. show time or similar. This involves the use of an editor
* If you absolutely need access to windows executables, investigate 'wine' a bit closer. Here, you might find the Xandros repositories lacking tools you will need. Go to http://www.eeeuser.com/ and educate yourself some more.
* Repeat previous step as required to implement whatever you want to do.

At some point you will find the Xandros 'playground' to be insufficient. It simply doesn't offer the tool or functionality you want. But hey, by then your chances of successfully moving on to another 'distro' are vastly better than today.

At that point, visit http://wiki.debian.org/DebianEeePC.
No sooner.

Yes, there are other distros out there aimed at netbooks - e.g. Ubuntu. But i'm biased Most Linux people are. The point is that you by then will have to make your own path. Of course the community will offer (biased ) advice and feedback. But ultimately, the ball will be in your courtyard.

Good luck!
 
  


Reply

Tags
asus, eee, linux, pc


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How to open/extract ISO file in Linux? sattu Linux - Software 9 10-13-2011 03:25 AM
Is it possible to open an exe file using linux? epochsoblivion Linux - Software 3 12-10-2006 12:27 PM
Linux File Extensions kompact Linux - Newbie 3 04-18-2005 09:15 AM
can't open a iso file in fedora? eye Fedora 1 09-20-2004 12:08 AM
Does anyone Know how to open either .iso.rz or these .iso.xdelta,.iso.bz2,.iso.lzma?? maximalred Debian 5 06-09-2004 06:15 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:15 AM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration