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Old 04-19-2005, 01:20 AM   #1
kompact
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How do I open .gz files?


I d/l Firefox, it came as firefox-1.0.3.installer.tar.gz

I am using Mandriva 10.1 how do I install this and other files I download? Thanks for the help.
 
Old 04-19-2005, 01:39 AM   #2
jschiwal
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That file type is known as a tarball. You can extract it with the command:
tar xvzf firefox-1.0.3.installer.tar.gz

This will produce a directory. There my be an executable script inside that you can run with 'kdesu'.
When I installed firefox, I changed the name of the default directory from /usr/local/firefox-installer to /usr/local/firefox
 
Old 04-19-2005, 09:32 PM   #3
kompact
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Thank you for the reply, but you are talking to a complete Linux Newbie. Is someone willing to walk me through this step by step?

"You can extract it with the command:
tar xvzf firefox-1.0.3.installer.tar.gz"

For example where do I type this command? Then what do I do from there? I am used to double clicking .exe files. Thanks in advance for the help.
 
Old 04-19-2005, 09:57 PM   #4
bigrigdriver
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Step 1) Use google to find "newbies linux manual".
Step 2) The ins and outs of tar and gz are thourghly explained, with examples. Read, try, and learn. There are also many other commonly used Linux command discussed in that document (it got me started 5 years ago).
Step 3) Check the system tray for an icon that looks like a terminal with a sea shell superimposed over it. That is a 'term window'. Click on that, and it will open to a command line terminal. Enter your commands in the terminal, and watch the magic.

If instructions tell you to 'su to root', that means enter the command 'su' (without quotes), and you will be prompted for the password of the user you want to su to (Switch User). Enter the root password (root is super-user, or system administrator, which is YOU in Linux).
 
Old 04-19-2005, 10:29 PM   #5
tsphan
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if you're using the KDE desktop, you could just use "ark" to open up the file and extract the installer to some place for you to run.
 
Old 04-20-2005, 03:00 PM   #6
kompact
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I don't understand why it is that Linux has to work like this. Under MS O/S I double click an .exe file or extract a compressed archive and then easily access the contents within it. I am still trying to learn how to install Firefox. I found this tutorial http://www.tuxfiles.org/linuxhelp/softinstall.html on how to work with "tarballs" and I just do not understand why it has to be so complicated. For a newbie Linux user this stuff has just about made me toss it and stick with M$.

Sorry if this sounds negative I am just a little frustrated and don't understand why Linux makes it so complicated to do the simplest thing.
 
Old 04-20-2005, 04:02 PM   #7
Padma
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Software installation is no more complicated than the user makes it. Most software for Mandrake can be installed with the click of a mouse, using rpmdrake. (True, you have to set up your repository sources, but that's a one-time thing.)

If you want/need to use the latest, cutting-edge versions of software, then it doesn't really matter much which distro you use, because you will have to compile from source, or at least use a generic tarball with a built-in installer.

In the case of Firefox, the tarball is just the least common denominator for compressing files. Think of it as a Zip file for Windows. You download the tarball, extract the contents, and then run the installer that you just unpacked. Pretty much the same way you would do it in Windows.
 
Old 04-20-2005, 06:59 PM   #8
Komakino
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Quote:
Originally posted by kompact
I don't understand why it is that Linux has to work like this. Under MS O/S I double click an .exe file or extract a compressed archive and then easily access the contents within it. I am still trying to learn how to install Firefox. I found this tutorial http://www.tuxfiles.org/linuxhelp/softinstall.html on how to work with "tarballs" and I just do not understand why it has to be so complicated. For a newbie Linux user this stuff has just about made me toss it and stick with M$.

Sorry if this sounds negative I am just a little frustrated and don't understand why Linux makes it so complicated to do the simplest thing.
It's not complicated, and whilst you might think linux makes it hard to do the simplist things, it makes it possible to do just about anything. Certainly more than can be said for windows (unless you want to pay out a lot and let the world know what you're doing).

Besides, using the command line is generally not only more powerful but also faster than using a graphical tool for the same job. Just because you're not used to it doesn't mean it's complicated! Typing tar xvf filename.tar.gz isn't exactly tough.
 
Old 04-20-2005, 08:31 PM   #9
redhat beginer
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I have Red Hat Enterprise Linux v. 3

I tried doing this, but hit a snag when configuring. I get a message that ends with

Quote:
checking whether make sets $(MAKE)... yes
checking for g++... no
checking for c++... no
checking for gpp... no
checking for aCC... no
checking for CC... no
checking for cxx... no
checking for cc++... no
checking for cl... no
checking for FCC... no
checking for KCC... no
checking for RCC... no
checking for xlC_r... no
checking for xlC... no
checking for C++ compiler default output file name... configure: error: C++ compiler cannot create executables
Am I correct in guessing that this is because I didn't 'opt' to install the programming suite when I first set up?

edit to add:
the tarball is totem-1.1.1.tar.gz BTW

Last edited by redhat beginer; 04-20-2005 at 08:34 PM.
 
Old 04-21-2005, 11:12 AM   #10
Padma
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Quote:
Originally posted by redhat beginer
I have Red Hat Enterprise Linux v. 3

I tried doing this, but hit a snag when configuring. I get a message that ends with



Am I correct in guessing that this is because I didn't 'opt' to install the programming suite when I first set up?

edit to add:
the tarball is totem-1.1.1.tar.gz BTW
Yes, you guess right.

When you use the "./configure / make / make install" system, you are compiling software from source. If you don't have the development tools (e.g. "programming suite"), you can't do it.

OTOH, is there a reason to not use YUM to install Totem?
 
Old 04-21-2005, 12:06 PM   #11
Genesee
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Quote:
Originally posted by redhat beginer
I have Red Hat Enterprise Linux v. 3

I tried doing this, but hit a snag when configuring. I get a message that ends with



Am I correct in guessing that this is because I didn't 'opt' to install the programming suite when I first set up?

edit to add:
the tarball is totem-1.1.1.tar.gz BTW
correct - you apparently have not installed a compiler, hence you will not be able to compile.
 
Old 04-21-2005, 03:03 PM   #12
redhat beginer
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Quote:
Originally posted by Padma
When you use the "./configure / make / make install" system, you are compiling software from source.
Wow. I am liking this already. It had seemed like that was what people were saying, and when RH was installing I was saying to myself 'Programming, nah, I'm not a programmer, don't need that'! I am genuinely enthusiastic about this (heh. lets see how long that lasts).

Quote:
OTOH, is there a reason to not use YUM to install Totem?
Don't have YUM, don't know where to get it. I've been a little confused as far as getting applications. MY RHELv3 comes with up2date, but apparently I need to subsrcibe to a channel and pay for that 'feature'. I've been able to get what I think is a working version of apt, but someone else mentioned that I need apt4rpm to be able to have more repositories and the like. Is YUM something that someone w/my OS would normally use?

Civ rules!
 
Old 04-21-2005, 03:14 PM   #13
kompact
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Thanks to all for the patient and helpful replies. I was getting frustrated because I couldn't even find where to type these command in! I have it all sorted out now though. Thanks again for the help.
 
Old 04-21-2005, 03:32 PM   #14
Genesee
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Quote:
Originally posted by kompact
Thanks to all for the patient and helpful replies. I was getting frustrated because I couldn't even find where to type these command in! I have it all sorted out now though. Thanks again for the help.
good to hear - and welcome to LQ. I suppose the whole thing can be a bit intimidating at first, but if you stick with it soon you'll find yourself frustrated instead with the limitations and underperformance of 'other' systems. everything (well, almost everything) in a *nix system does have a logical purpose, even if not always intuitive.

 
Old 04-21-2005, 04:01 PM   #15
Padma
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Quote:
Originally posted by redhat beginer
Wow. I am liking this already. It had seemed like that was what people were saying, and when RH was installing I was saying to myself 'Programming, nah, I'm not a programmer, don't need that'! I am genuinely enthusiastic about this (heh. lets see how long that lasts).
Yeah, you don't *need* to be a programmer to build things from source. The programmers write the source code and distribute it. You *do* need the tools to build it, though.

If you really like the idea of building from source, you might want to give the Gentoo distro a try. Everything is compiled from scratch in that one.
Quote:
Don't have YUM, don't know where to get it. I've been a little confused as far as getting applications. MY RHELv3 comes with up2date, but apparently I need to subsrcibe to a channel and pay for that 'feature'. I've been able to get what I think is a working version of apt, but someone else mentioned that I need apt4rpm to be able to have more repositories and the like. Is YUM something that someone w/my OS would normally use?
I don't use RH, and so may be making some mistakes here (but I am sure someone will be all too glad to point them out ), but my understanding is that YUM is a graphical front-end for rpm management. So yes, YUM would be a very helpful tool for a RH user. (I don't know anything about having to subscribe to up2date - sounds kind of screwy to me. ) But you should be able to at least download rpms from RPM PBone Search, or similar sites, and install them. Of course without using a Package Manager like YUM, you could find yourself in "dependency hell", and get totally frustrated. (Grabbing tarballs off the net and installing them can also make your system unstable, as you start tweaking your system libraries and such to make the latest find "work".)

Here is a thread about yum and up2date.


Quote:
Civ rules!
Right on!
 
  


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