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Old 08-19-2013, 11:22 AM   #1
omran97
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how do i migrate from ubuntu to debian


how do i migrate from ubuntu to debian while keeping my app and my stuff?
 
Old 08-19-2013, 12:00 PM   #2
WarTurkey
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Keeping your documents would be easy enough. If you have your Home directory on its own partition, you don't even need to worry about backing it up or anything, just ensure that going through the Debian install process, you do NOT choose to format that /home directory! Though, more likely than not, your home directory is on the same drive as the rest of your system. In that case, you will want to probably make a tarball of your home directory and back it up to some other drive. Maybe an external hard drive or a flash drive (if it's small enough). Then just extract the tar file after the Debian installation and your files will be back! You might need to change the ownership of the files, however.

You can't move your programs over. Ubuntu is based on Debian, and uses the same package management, however it uses different packages. The program packages installed on Ubuntu are not compatible with those found in Debian. You'll need to install your apps again, I believe.
 
Old 08-19-2013, 12:01 PM   #3
TobiSGD
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You can't migrate, Ubuntu and Debian are not compatible. Backup your data and make a fresh install of Debian.
 
Old 08-19-2013, 12:07 PM   #4
omran97
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isn't there someway to take the name of the software and reinstall them>?
 
Old 08-19-2013, 05:31 PM   #5
WarTurkey
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I was just thinking about that

I wouldn't do it on my own system, but you might be able to do:

Code:
dpkg --get-selections | cut -f 1
That should list all your packages. You might be able to...

Code:
dpkg --get-selections | cut -f 1 | tr '\n' ' ' && echo > ./packages.txt
to store all of your packages and then something like...

Code:
apt-get install "$(cat ./packages.txt)"
to have it install all of those packages, but the thing is there's likely to be a whole lot that don't exist in Debian that are in Ubuntu and vice-versa. You will most likely have problems.

maybe just read through this output and just keep packages that you recognize (for me, I see "xz-utilz" "p7zip-full" "squashfs-utils" "smbclient" to name a few) that I would just copy and paste into a new text file and just apt-get from that.
 
Old 08-19-2013, 08:21 PM   #6
frankbell
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WarTurkey's advice works, but note that it will list everything, including the default software load. The list can be quite long; on my Debian box, it listed 3,087 packages.

You might want to pipe the output to a file:

Code:
dpkg --get-selections | cut -f 1 > [somefilename]
which you can then view in an editor.

If you haven't installed a lot of applications beyond the default set, it might be easier to open the software center, or even just the menu, and make a list by hand.
 
Old 08-19-2013, 08:54 PM   #7
k3lt01
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Or you could just do
Code:
sudo dpkg --get-selections > packages.txt
Starting on an Ubuntu box you'll probably need sudo
Then on your Debian system (you'll need to be root)
Code:
dpkg --set-selections < packages.txt
Then
Code:
apt-get update && sudo apt-get -u dselect-upgrade
Now I haven't done this for a few years but from memory that is the method I used to use. You may wonder why I don't do it like this anymore, well packages change between releases (dependencies and what is actually available as well) and if there is a change it is often simply quicker to do it manually rather than go through this process.

The big thing is to have a seperate /home so your settings remain even though your / folder is totaly new and clean.
 
Old 08-19-2013, 09:08 PM   #8
TobiSGD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k3lt01 View Post
Or you could just do
Code:
sudo dpkg --get-selections > packages.txt
Starting on an Ubuntu box you'll probably need sudo
Then on your Debian system (you'll need to be root)
Code:
dpkg --set-selections < packages.txt
Then
Code:
apt-get update && sudo apt-get -u dselect-upgrade
Now I haven't done this for a few years but from memory that is the method I used to use. You may wonder why I don't do it like this anymore, well packages change between releases (dependencies and what is actually available as well) and if there is a change it is often simply quicker to do it manually rather than go through this process.

The big thing is to have a seperate /home so your settings remain even though your / folder is totaly new and clean.
This works if you keep it on one distribution, for example setting up a a Debian system with a package list from a different Debian system. This will definitely not work with migrating from Ubuntu to Debian, since Debian simply misses many packages that are part of a standard Ubuntu installation, like jockey-gtk, Unity (and related packages, like the different lenses) and so on.
 
Old 08-20-2013, 12:19 AM   #9
k3lt01
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
This works if you keep it on one distribution, for example setting up a a Debian system with a package list from a different Debian system. This will definitely not work with migrating from Ubuntu to Debian, since Debian simply misses many packages that are part of a standard Ubuntu installation, like jockey-gtk, Unity (and related packages, like the different lenses) and so on.
Thanks, it has worked in the past but Ubuntu moved further away from Debian. Thus the reason I also said
Quote:
You may wonder why I don't do it like this anymore, well packages change between releases (dependencies and what is actually available as well) and if there is a change it is often simply quicker to do it manually rather than go through this process.
 
Old 08-20-2013, 06:18 AM   #10
omran97
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is it better to go from ubuntu to debian?
 
Old 08-20-2013, 06:21 AM   #11
TobiSGD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by omran97 View Post
is it better to go from ubuntu to debian?
Better for what? Tell us why you want to migrate to Debian and we can tell you if it is reasonable and if a migration will achieve what you want to achieve or if there are easier ways.
 
Old 08-20-2013, 08:52 AM   #12
omran97
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
Better for what? Tell us why you want to migrate to Debian and we can tell you if it is reasonable and if a migration will achieve what you want to achieve or if there are easier ways.
about the ubuntu spyware and needing to format the harddrive every 6 month to install the new version of ubuntu
 
Old 08-20-2013, 09:07 AM   #13
yancek
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There is no need to reinstall every 6 months. Install an LTS like 12.04 which has four more years of support (April, 2017) and you can just do your security and other updates you want.
 
Old 08-20-2013, 09:36 AM   #14
omran97
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and the ubuntu spyware?
 
Old 08-20-2013, 11:04 AM   #15
evo2
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HI,
Quote:
Originally Posted by omran97 View Post
and the ubuntu spyware?
It can be uninstalled. But personally, I prefer a distribution that doesn't have it in the first place.

Evo2.
 
  


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