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Old 11-28-2014, 01:17 PM   #1
freethemushrooms
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Question How do I learn code, and anyone used the Linux Disk Cleaner?


Let's just assume that I'm a computer retard, but I really want to start learning about code. What's the best place to start? Also I have a homeschooled son who is really interested in computers and I would like to be able to help him learn, or at least point him in the right direction. I have Ubunutu 14.04, i think that's the latest, right?

What got me started is I was wondering if I should download the Linux Disk Cleaner. One of the reviews said:

It works for me. But if you are willing to learn a little about command line, you can do better with the following commands:
sudo su (log as root)
(it will ask you to enter password)
# apt-get -q -y -f autoremove
( this will remove automatically all unused packages)

Then follow up with
# apt-get -q clean
(to remove archives downloaded during installation.)


# apt-get -h (will get you a list of apt-get commands you can copy and paste in a text editor for reference.)



Any thoughts? Is this true? Anyone used the Linux Disk Cleaner?
Thanks guys!
 
Old 11-28-2014, 01:26 PM   #2
javpra
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Freethemushrooms,

There are many different ways to get started coding. There are many languages and each with it's own strengths. With that said my personal recommendation would be to start with Python. It's pretty easy to use and has a lot of free online tutorials and videos. Here is a link from Python's "official" site.

https://wiki.python.org/moin/Beginne...NonProgrammers

As far as Disk Cleaner goes, I'm not familiar with it so I can't help there. I have used Debian for a very long time and can attest that `autoremove` does do a good job. That is only available in Debian based distributions by default. I hope this helps.
 
Old 11-28-2014, 03:44 PM   #3
John VV
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almost the same as above


python can do MANY different things
including being used for one of the BEST card came programs

"PySol"
Python Solitaire
the community supported version of it is in almost EVERY distro's repos

to being used by NASA and JPL for working with space mission data


as to a "disk cleaner"

i am VERY VERY LEARY of anything being SOLD
they are SCAMS

now

some tools are good
and the GOOD ones will be in your operating systems software repos

"bleachbit" and "sweeper" are two common programs

"srm" -- there are a few different versions of this
( "Secure"rm it is a version of the normal command "rm" )

"shred"

then the "ULTIMATE" in disk cleaning
the 20 Megaton Thermonuclear option
"Darik's Boot and Nuke"


bleachbit will be in the ubuntu repos
and is a very good program
-- word of caution --
READ what it is going to REMOVED and clean off the drive !!!!!!!!!
it can be set to do things you might NOT want to have happen
like remove the login cookies for say your amazon account and EVERY web site you use
-- while not "bad" this can be a pain if you have to retype in your user name and pass for 100+ websites
 
Old 11-28-2014, 05:34 PM   #4
freethemushrooms
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Hey thanks, I appreciate it. All you guys here are great and I've learned a lot already in the past year.
 
Old 11-28-2014, 08:42 PM   #5
frankbell
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I have never used any "disk cleaner," other than System Suite back in my Windows days (it worked quite nicely, too). I skeptical that such programs live up to their billing.

A search for "Linux disk cleaner" will turn up several reviews and articles that you might find helpful.
 
Old 11-29-2014, 12:09 AM   #6
jlinkels
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Hmmmm weird post to ask something obvious and which asked 1000 before and in the same post ask about a proprietary package, which is sold for money, which is useless and which got a ton of bad reviews. And you don't even point out what your problem is which make you believe you want to use that package. Are you sure this is not advertising?

jlinkels
 
Old 11-29-2014, 09:58 PM   #7
Fred Caro
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Regarding python you could look at 'python the hardway' from a web search.

Fred.
 
Old 11-29-2014, 11:37 PM   #8
suicidaleggroll
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Frankly, I work in the sciences, and nobody at my company or any of our competing companies uses Python. I do a lot of work with JPL and NASA as well, and nobody I interface with there uses Python either. It's a very high level language like Matlab or IDL, which means it doesn't have the speed necessary to do critical jobs. It is free, which is nice, but it doesn't have the backwards compatibility required by those in the industry, which is why they steer clear of it for the most part. For companies, the few thousand dollars for a Matlab or IDL license is trivial, so they generally don't bother with the free alternatives that have questionable cross-version compatibility. When you're a company with paid programmers, spending $2000 for a Matlab/IDL license is nothing compared to spending $200 a month for a programmer to keep your code library up-to-date so it can continue to work through language/dependency changes and updates.

If you want to learn Python just because, that's all well and good, but if you're looking for a marketable skill you'd be MUCH better off going after C/C++, Fortran, or Java instead IMO. C/C++ for the low-level programming oriented fields, Fortran for the science oriented fields, Java for the pretty consumer-driven cross platform GUIs.
 
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Old 11-30-2014, 12:28 PM   #9
DavidMcCann
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The OP is not aiming at a career at NASA: he just want to try his hand at programming!

Python is a good place to start: taking C as your first language is a bit like learning to swim by jumping off a cliff. A lot of the utilities in Linux, like installers, are written in Python: read more at Wikipedia. Incidentally, for scientific use of Python, see here
https://www.python.org/about/success


On the subject of clean-up tools, I'd say avoid them. They're not going to improve your computer's performance (hint: Linux is not Windows) and they can be a source of nasty accidents.
 
Old 12-07-2014, 04:47 PM   #10
rnturn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by freethemushrooms View Post
Let's just assume that I'm a computer retard, but I really want to start learning about code. What's the best place to start? Also I have a homeschooled son who is really interested in computers and I would like to be able to help him learn, or at least point him in the right direction.
I'll start by assuming that you're not that dumb about computers. And kudos for your son for having the interest.

I just bought one of my daughters a beginning book on Python. It claims that one can learn Python with little to no previous experience. We'll see about that claim, I guess. (Actually, Python's not one of my strongest languages so I'll be learning more about it as she dives in.)

Since, you're running a Linux distribution, there's always writing shell scripts. I can't recommend a good beginning title on shell programming (all the ones I learned from are really old and likely out of print anyway.) I wouldn't shy away from one of the "For Dummies" books though you may grow out of it quickly. Your local library may have some of these so you don't have to spend money on a book that you won't find useful in short order.

I always tell anyone coming to me with a question like this is to have some projects in mind that you wish to accomplish using the programming language you're trying to learn. Obviously, keep the initial projects simple. You can add more complexity as more and more of the language is learned. It'll take time. Nobody goes from writing a simple "Hello, World" program directly to an interactive web site using a relational database back-end. Learn the basics and try using the language to solve some problems encountered during school work. Surely there are some math problems that would work as potential small programming projects.

Once you know one programming language, learning another isn't as big a step. Just stay away from BASIC as a first language. (Rick hangs head in shame. )

Quote:
What got me started is I was wondering if I should download the Linux Disk Cleaner. One of the reviews said:

It works for me. But if you are willing to learn a little about command line, you can do better with the following commands:
sudo su (log as root)
(it will ask you to enter password)
# apt-get -q -y -f autoremove
( this will remove automatically all unused packages)

Then follow up with
# apt-get -q clean
(to remove archives downloaded during installation.)
First off, I'm not a *buntu user so these may be perfectly reasonable commands. I'm a little leery of any utility that claims to know what packages are "unused". Unless, though, they mean a package that's been installed that nothing depends on. Even then I would still suggest caution. Part of me thinks this smacks of one of those silly Windows cleaners that you see hawked on TV. I wouldn't use one of those either. (If I actually used Windows, that is.) Windows does actually (or, at least, used to) suffer from some performance issues when there's a lot of stuff installed that isn't used. For example, I recall people having performance problems on Windows that were the result of their having downloaded and installed every crazy-looking font known to Mankind. Removing all of them but the basics sped things up considerably. I've never encountered such a problem on Linux so I take the performance-improving claims of such a utility with a huge grain of salt.

--
Rick
 
  


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