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Old 02-28-2009, 03:03 PM   #1
linkinparc91
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how do i install linux?


i recently obtained a copy of pc linux build 2005 and i want to install it. how do i do this without disrupting my current setup? if im runing windows xp right now and ive got alot of music and files i'd rather not lose, if i install it will it delete these? also once i install the os will all my hardware drivers work or will i need to redownload them? please help
 
Old 02-28-2009, 03:52 PM   #2
pixellany
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Welcome to LQ!!

PCLinuxOS is a great distro, but there is a much more current version available. To see the current range of choices, go to http://distrowatch.com

Depending on your hardware, there are many ways to install Linux, but I would not try any of them without having important data backed up.

If you have a desktop machine, a REALLY safe and easy method is to simply install another hard-drive. This way, the Windows installation is undisturbed.

The most common method is dual-booting, and is done in the following basic steps:
1. Resize the Windows partition(s) to create a minimum of 10GB of empty space. This can be done with a utility CD such as GParted.
2. Burn a CD for the desired version of Linux. (For PC Linux 2005, it sounds like you already have that.)
3. Boot from the Linux CD
4. Install

The typical installer will automatically detect the Windows install and set up the bootloader for dual-boot.

The "getting started" link in my sig below might help also.
 
Old 02-28-2009, 03:52 PM   #3
serafean
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Hi, you do need free space on your windows drive in order to be able to create a new partition for Linux. Fiddling with partitions is always risky, so do backup your data.
Insert your Linux cd and boot it. After that, there should be a graphical installer or normal desktop system that fires up. You will then be guided through the whole install process (from partitioning to software selection). With the partitioner be careful!! Thats where you can delete data.
The Linux kernel has many drivers included, however some vendors don't do/support opensource drivers and you will have to download a binary blob (proprietary driver). The needed ones are usually ATI an NVIDIA drivers. These drivers are usually available through the distribution's package manager.

Beaten by Pixellany...

Last edited by serafean; 02-28-2009 at 03:55 PM.
 
Old 02-28-2009, 03:54 PM   #4
camorri
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First of all, that is very old, I would recommend you get something that is up to date. Hardware support has improved greatly since 2005.

You can download and burn a CD, or a set of CD's or a DVD and install from there. There are instructions on how to do all these things on this board, look at the right side of the screen and you will see Download Linux, reviews etc. If you don't want to do this, then you can buy a set of CD's very inexpensively. Your choice.

Will you loose your data? That all depends on your skill level.

Linux supports many file systems, more than windoze. There are many choices on how to install. You can get many 'Live CD's' These run from a CD or DVD drive, and you install nothing.

Look at Knoppix as one possibility. This way you can learn about linux, and not touch your XP install.

I have one system with XP and Slackware. I used Partition Magic to shrink the space XP had. I installed linux to the now unused free space. I lost nothing in the process. XP is using NTFS file system and linux is using ext3. Linux can mount and read/write to NTFS. XP can not read or write EXT3. That is just fine with me.

Another approach is to buy a second hard drive for your system. Install linux there. That way you do not have to mess with the partitioning in XP.

What ever you do, make backups of your data before you begin. Then if you do have to re-install XP you can restore your data.

There are also tutorials around on how to do a 'dual boot system'. Have a look, google if you have to. Ask questions if you need to.

Hope this helps...
 
Old 02-28-2009, 04:53 PM   #5
linkinparc91
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ok, so is hould probably get a newer version first? if i run the version ive got will it cause any problems? the os may be old but so is my motherboard lol
 
Old 02-28-2009, 05:00 PM   #6
camorri
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Quote:
if i run the version ive got will it cause any problems?
If you are careful to first backup your data, use a partitioning tool, and make room, then no it will not cause problems. The biggest issue will be hardware support. If the hardware is older too, then you may be able to get things going.

Problem areas are sound, video drivers, and wireless. These forums are full of newbies trying to get these things going.
 
Old 02-28-2009, 05:32 PM   #7
linkinparc91
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Quote:
Originally Posted by camorri View Post
First of all, that is very old, I would recommend you get something that is up to date. Hardware support has improved greatly since 2005.

You can download and burn a CD, or a set of CD's or a DVD and install from there. There are instructions on how to do all these things on this board, look at the right side of the screen and you will see Download Linux, reviews etc. If you don't want to do this, then you can buy a set of CD's very inexpensively. Your choice.

Will you loose your data? That all depends on your skill level.

Linux supports many file systems, more than windoze. There are many choices on how to install. You can get many 'Live CD's' These run from a CD or DVD drive, and you install nothing.

Look at Knoppix as one possibility. This way you can learn about linux, and not touch your XP install.

I have one system with XP and Slackware. I used Partition Magic to shrink the space XP had. I installed linux to the now unused free space. I lost nothing in the process. XP is using NTFS file system and linux is using ext3. Linux can mount and read/write to NTFS. XP can not read or write EXT3. That is just fine with me.

Another approach is to buy a second hard drive for your system. Install linux there. That way you do not have to mess with the partitioning in XP.

What ever you do, make backups of your data before you begin. Then if you do have to re-install XP you can restore your data.

There are also tutorials around on how to do a 'dual boot system'. Have a look, google if you have to. Ask questions if you need to.

Hope this helps...
what i have is a live cd. but it also has the abillity to install, my main questio is will it have to compleatly format?
i can't just do an install on top of windows
 
Old 02-28-2009, 05:42 PM   #8
camorri
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If you install on top of windows, you will not have a windows system left; or any files that were there.

You have to create free space, that is space NOT allocated to any partition. You have to create a new partition, format it with a linux file system, and install to that.

If it is a live CD, boot it, and try it out. It will run rather slow, and by itself will not harm your windows system.

If you are ready to trash windows ( no way back ) then you can delete the windows partition, and install. I do not know what distro you have. Some of them have very nice installers that walk you through it step by step. However, unless you know what you are doing, you may find it confusing.
 
Old 02-28-2009, 05:52 PM   #9
pixellany
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Quote:
Originally Posted by linkinparc91 View Post
what i have is a live cd. but it also has the abillity to install, my main questio is will it have to compleatly format?
i can't just do an install on top of windows
Go back to my other post---one way or another you have to create space to put a Linux partition. I suggested 2 ways of doing that.

In re drivers: I don't see if anyone mentioned this----you will not normally use Windows drivers---Linux comes with its own. There **could** be issues in this regard with the older version you have, but there is nothing to lose by trying it.
 
Old 02-28-2009, 05:59 PM   #10
mmmichael
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Take a look at wubi: http://wubi-installer.org/. You can download it as an executable program and run it from within Windows. It installs Ubuntu Linux while doing no harm to your Windows installation.
This way you won't have to modify your partitions at all. Once you get comfortable with Linux, consider installing a native Linux partition and trying other distros.

Last edited by mmmichael; 02-28-2009 at 06:09 PM. Reason: added.
 
Old 02-28-2009, 06:33 PM   #11
mdsmedia
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2005 was when I first installed Linux

A 2005 version of PCLinuxOS is rather dated and easily replaced.

Most computer magazines have a software DVD or CD included, and a lot of them include the latest (or later) versions of Linux distributions.

I started using Ubuntu Linux in 2005 and it's come ahead in leaps and bounds since then.

I really would suggest either finding a computer magazine with a Linux distro on the cover DVD or downloading a later version from any of the many distro websites.

If you just want to try your LiveCD, boot to it and try out the version you have. If you want to install it, backup first. Remember you're not just installing an application in Windows. You're installing an operating system.....which Windows is.
 
  


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