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Old 05-02-2011, 01:32 PM   #1
Chuckles278
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How do I get full permission to all files and folders in Ubuntu?


I am basically Linux/Ubuntu illiterate.(just in case the question itself did not make that clear)
 
Old 05-02-2011, 01:33 PM   #2
repo
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By becoming root, or using sudo
https://help.ubuntu.com/community/RootSudo

Kind regards

Last edited by repo; 05-02-2011 at 01:35 PM.
 
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Old 05-02-2011, 01:39 PM   #3
lupusarcanus
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You need to become 'root' (Administrator in Windows terminology) to have full permission to all files in Linux. On Ubuntu, this is done by opening up a Terminal and typing sudo <command>. For example, if you'd like to open your file manager (the thing that displays your files in folders graphically) as root, simple type in 'sudo nautilus'. sudo will prompt you for your password.

Be careful, using the root account is dangerous and should be avoided as much as possible, and certainly not used by default.

With great power comes great responsibility.
 
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Old 05-02-2011, 01:42 PM   #4
repo
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Quote:
For example, if you'd like to open your file manager (the thing that displays your files in folders graphically) as root, simple type in 'sudo nautilus'.
When calling graphical programs in Gnome, use "gksu" instead of "sudo."

Kind regards
 
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Old 05-02-2011, 02:36 PM   #5
Sjonnie48
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Code:
#sudo apt-get install nautilus-gksu
This adds a new entry to the context menu of Nautilus: Open as administrator.
 
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Old 05-03-2011, 12:59 AM   #6
mikeb380
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Wink Tried it, it works

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sjonnie48 View Post
Code:
#sudo apt-get install nautilus-gksu
This adds a new entry to the context menu of Nautilus: Open as administrator.
Sjonnie, ok, it works,k now how do I get it back to normal?
Thnx
Michael
 
Old 05-03-2011, 01:01 AM   #7
repo
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Quote:
Sjonnie, ok, it works,k now how do I get it back to normal?
Remove the installed package?

Kind regards
 
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Old 05-03-2011, 01:08 AM   #8
mikeb380
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Quote:
Originally Posted by repo View Post
Remove the installed package?
Kind regards
Thanks repo, that explains it to me Should I use dynamite in the exhaust pipe?

Michael
 
Old 05-03-2011, 01:22 AM   #9
repo
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Code:
sudo apt-get remove nautilus-gksu
Or use nautilius.
I don't understand what you mean by
Quote:
Sjonnie, ok, it works,k now how do I get it back to normal?

Kind regards

Last edited by repo; 05-03-2011 at 01:23 AM.
 
Old 05-11-2011, 12:30 PM   #10
Chuckles278
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It looks like there is some disagreement in the replies above and then the conversation goes to a place where I don't understand the terminology being used. I say that to ask that you excuse me if I'm asking a question that is answered above. If my question is answered above please point it out to me. Also, I realize that the fact that I am using the trial version of Ubuntu could be the reason that I am unable to change the permissions and if so can someone suggest a way that I can view files and folders that were created by the 'root user'(my late father) and require the appropriate permissions(I'm assuming 'root' permissions) without changing any files currently on the system? For anyone answering that is not aware...although I have operated a computer in a text environment(Dos over 2 decades ago) I am far from literate in linux text mode. Over the time since, I have been using Windows and Mac operating systems pretty much exclusively with a GUI. Thank you for the help. I have been very impressed with the response that I have gotten on this forum.
 
Old 05-11-2011, 01:15 PM   #11
yancek
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Ubuntu and its derivatives do not use root in the same way as most other Linux distributions. You will need to use the sudo command to get root privileges. So let's start at the beginning.
Are you able to actually boot into Ubuntu and get to the Desktop?
When you boot Ubuntu, do you have a user at the login screen and are you prompted to select a password?
Do you know the password so that you can enter it and get to the Desktop?

If you have auto-login enabled and don't need a password, that's one problem.
If you do login with the password and can't access files that is another problem.
Indicate which is the case and what you have done to try to access files.
 
Old 05-11-2011, 01:28 PM   #12
tredegar
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Some Q's for you:

Is this your late father's (condolences) computer?
Are you trying to read his files?
What do you mean that you are running a "trial version" of ubuntu? Do you mean you are booting from a live CD?

I think we'd be able to give you more focussed, practical and better advice if we understood exactly what you are trying to do.

For example, setting up the computer so you can log into your late father's account is probably trivial. Do you know what OS (eg ubuntu) his computer is running?
 
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Old 05-11-2011, 01:52 PM   #13
Chuckles278
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Quote:
Ubuntu and its derivatives do not use root in the same way as most other Linux distributions. You will need to use the sudo command to get root privileges. So let's start at the beginning.
Are you able to actually boot into Ubuntu and get to the Desktop?
When you boot Ubuntu, do you have a user at the login screen and are you prompted to select a password?
Do you know the password so that you can enter it and get to the Desktop?

If you have auto-login enabled and don't need a password, that's one problem.
If you do login with the password and can't access files that is another problem.
Indicate which is the case and what you have done to try to access files.
I am using the trial version of Ubuntu because when I first turned the system on it booted into Linux text mode which I haven't yet learned even how to explore what files are on the system in this mode. I asked for a graphical way to do this exploration without doing anything to modify the system. The response that I got was to use the Ubuntu trial version which has given me the GUI without modifications which has been helpful in viewing many of the files on the system. I do have the login username and password but am not prompted for it when I boot into the Ubuntu trial version environment. When I turn the system on with the Ubuntu disk in the drive, it prompts for language choice and either "Try Ubuntu" or "Install Ubuntu". I always choose trial as I understand that the installation will modify the system which I don't want to do. After choosing trial it takes me directly to the desktop environment where I can view many defaults of Ubuntu as well as the drives and folders of the server. I can access many of the files and folders, but some say "you do not have the permissions necessary to view..." The way that I am trying to access the file is from the Ubuntu trial desktop environment I choose: places>computer>drive name>folder>locked folder.
Thank you for your help!
 
Old 05-11-2011, 05:36 PM   #14
yancek
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The information in your last post indicates that you are using what is commonly referred to as a "Live CD". The purpose of this CD is as you said, to try it without making changes to your computer. The options you get are Try without installing or Install. By choosing the Try without installing, you are using just the Live CD and it is read-only. You can't write anything to it.

There are some directories which will give you that message. You should be able to access them as root by using "sudo" (without quotes).
If you want to view files in the gui with the file manager, open a terminal (click on the Applications tab at the upper left of the Desktop and look for terminal) and enter in the terminal window: sudo nautilus, or one of the other commands suggested above.

So using the Live CD, you will not be able to save any changes after a reboot.
Do you have another operating system on the computer whose files you are trying to access?
If so, what is it?
Could you give an example of a specific directory (folder) you were denied access to?
 
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Old 05-12-2011, 12:38 AM   #15
Chuckles278
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Quote:
The information in your last post indicates that you are using what is commonly referred to as a "Live CD". The purpose of this CD is as you said, to try it without making changes to your computer. The options you get are Try without installing or Install. By choosing the Try without installing, you are using just the Live CD and it is read-only. You can't write anything to it.

There are some directories which will give you that message. You should be able to access them as root by using "sudo" (without quotes).
If you want to view files in the gui with the file manager, open a terminal (click on the Applications tab at the upper left of the Desktop and look for terminal) and enter in the terminal window: sudo nautilus, or one of the other commands suggested above.

So using the Live CD, you will not be able to save any changes after a reboot.
Do you have another operating system on the computer whose files you are trying to access?
If so, what is it?
Could you give an example of a specific directory (folder) you were denied access to?
You are correct. I do remember it being called a "Live CD" somewhere. My father lost his sight about 5 years before he passed away. He was well versed and had almost certainly been a contributor to the development of Linux from the beginning. I say that to say, the operating system that he used was Linux in text mode and setup with as much knowledge of the OS as could be obtained. I am telling you this because I don't know how sophisticated Linux is but my father did and certainly utilized it to its fullest extent as it was his preferred OS.
I get to the example folder from the desktop view of Ubuntu "Live CD" via this path: places>computer>drive name>folder>locked folder
 
  


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