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Old 04-25-2008, 05:47 AM   #1
twlaaas
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Registered: Apr 2008
Location: Traverse City Michigan
Distribution: Ubuntu Karmic Koala 9.10
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How can you roll back to a previous version 7.10 of Kubuntu or fix 8.04


How can you roll back to a previous version of Kubuntu. I had 7.10 installed and working fine I attempted the upgrade of Hardy Heron 8.04 and all went well and seemed to upgrade until I tried to use adept manager, synatic, ntfs config tools and konsol so far none of them work they just try to start and then shut down nothing happens. I was able to connect to another hard drive on this computer (WinXP) after the upgrade it shows that it is empty. I can boot to that drive and it works fine but Kubuntu no longer can access the drive.
Konsole says this every time you enter anything.
thomas@thomas:~$ sudo apt-get upgrade
sudo: unable to resolve host thomas
Any Ideas?
 
Old 04-25-2008, 06:11 AM   #2
arochester
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Registered: May 2006
Distribution: Debian
Posts: 608

Rep: Reputation: 98
Quote:
Konsole says this every time you enter anything.
thomas@thomas:~$ sudo apt-get upgrade
sudo: unable to resolve host thomas
You may have lost your superuser (sudo) status.

Copied from http://ubuntuforums.org/archive/index.php/t-150021.html :

"Use the 'Recovery Mode from the Grub menu at startup.

Recovery mode will drop you to a root prompt. If you don't see the GRUB menu at startup then you probably have to press the ESC key to view it, as its sometimes hidden and only revealed when you hit the ESC key.

Once at the root prompt you can use this command to edit the /etc/sudoers file..

visudo #this command does on thing. It opens the sudoers file for editing

My sudoers file looks like this. Note the last line where I give my user sudo privileges. This is the line that would need to be added by those who, for whatever reason, don't have sudo privileges.

# /etc/sudoers
#
# This file MUST be edited with the 'visudo' command as root.
#
# See the man page for details on how to write a sudoers file.
#

# Host alias specification

# User alias specification

# Cmnd alias specification

# Defaults

Defaults !lecture,tty_tickets,!fqdn

# User privilege specification
root ALL=(ALL) ALL
mustard ALL=(ALL) ALL


You can see my username on the bottom line. You would need to add your username to the bottom as I have done.

Assuming your user name was "bob'', then the line that would need to be added would be..
bob ALL=(ALL) ALL

This is just one way of doing it. Some sudoers files are set up with an admin group called 'adm'. Users are then added to the adm group, and a line in the sudoers file that looks like this below gives members of the 'adm' group admin access.
%adm ALL=(ALL) ALL

If you decided to do it this way you would create the line above at the bottom of your sudoers file then do this command (substituting your username in the appropriate place)..

adduser your_username adm"
 
Old 04-25-2008, 06:17 AM   #3
syg00
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Registered: Aug 2003
Location: Australia
Distribution: Lots ...
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I don't know about "rolling back" - or Kubuntu for that matter.
What I did during the alpha/beta testing for Ubuntu, was to re-install gutsy completely. Just slapped it over the top of the hardy install. I use a separate partition for /home, and it worked fine. Nothing stopped/broke. I was suitably impressed.

I have been badly disappointed with hardy. Personally I won't be rushing to upgrade normal (i.e. non-test) systems.
 
Old 05-02-2008, 12:58 PM   #4
twlaaas
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Apr 2008
Location: Traverse City Michigan
Distribution: Ubuntu Karmic Koala 9.10
Posts: 4

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by arochester View Post
You may have lost your superuser (sudo) status.

Copied from http://ubuntuforums.org/archive/index.php/t-150021.html :

"Use the 'Recovery Mode from the Grub menu at startup.

Recovery mode will drop you to a root prompt. If you don't see the GRUB menu at startup then you probably have to press the ESC key to view it, as its sometimes hidden and only revealed when you hit the ESC key.

Once at the root prompt you can use this command to edit the /etc/sudoers file..

visudo #this command does on thing. It opens the sudoers file for editing

My sudoers file looks like this. Note the last line where I give my user sudo privileges. This is the line that would need to be added by those who, for whatever reason, don't have sudo privileges.

# /etc/sudoers
#
# This file MUST be edited with the 'visudo' command as root.
#
# See the man page for details on how to write a sudoers file.
#

# Host alias specification

# User alias specification

# Cmnd alias specification

# Defaults

Defaults !lecture,tty_tickets,!fqdn

# User privilege specification
root ALL=(ALL) ALL
mustard ALL=(ALL) ALL


You can see my username on the bottom line. You would need to add your username to the bottom as I have done.

Assuming your user name was "bob'', then the line that would need to be added would be..
bob ALL=(ALL) ALL

This is just one way of doing it. Some sudoers files are set up with an admin group called 'adm'. Users are then added to the adm group, and a line in the sudoers file that looks like this below gives members of the 'adm' group admin access.
%adm ALL=(ALL) ALL

If you decided to do it this way you would create the line above at the bottom of your sudoers file then do this command (substituting your username in the appropriate place)..

adduser your_username adm"
I tried doing this but when I tried to type in my user name it would not let me. It was like the keyboard was useless. So I ended up downloading the ISO of Hardy Heron and attempted to install, it seem to go all the way through and said it had to be restarted to finish. However when rebooting it came back up in a locked mode of detecting what I don't know cause there is where it stayed. I put in my Fiesty Fawn 7.10 and did the install without a hitch. I did all the updates. Then put in the Hardy Heron 8.04 and it worked fine this time and I am still using it and loving every minute of it. Great distro! Thanks for the info though.
 
  


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