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Old 05-01-2013, 03:28 AM   #1
ravi_nandula
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How can we change the existing 32bit OS to 64bit OS in Linux


Hi All,

I am using system with Linux operating system of 32bit . As of now I am having requirement of same(existing) OS with 64bit version.

Can it be possible to upgrade the existing 32bit to 64bit in Linux?.......If I can upgrade kindle let me the process.

Thanks in Advance.

Thanks,
Ravi
 
Old 05-01-2013, 03:36 AM   #2
John VV
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You do a new clean install with a 64 bit build of this "linux" operating system
that is assuming that the hardware IS 64 bit

then move over data only from a known good back up

by "data" i mean
movies ,music, photos , documents, and such .
 
Old 05-01-2013, 11:30 AM   #3
Timothy Miller
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SOME linux distros offer the ability to (easily) add multi-architecture so that you could install the 64-bit programs. I do this with Debian (64-bit installs) in order to install 32-bit only software (skype and steam).

Not sure if after adding it you'd be able to fully convert, but I'd think if you added multiarch support then installed a 64-bit kernel (which would bring in all the other lowlevel 64-bit necessities), you could convert it.

That said, the time in FULLY converting would probably end up being significantly longer than just reinstalling a 64-bit version.

Last edited by Timothy Miller; 05-01-2013 at 11:34 AM.
 
Old 05-01-2013, 11:38 AM   #4
suicidaleggroll
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Timothy Miller View Post
SOME linux distros offer the ability to (easily) add multi-architecture so that you could install the 64-bit programs. I do this with Debian (64-bit installs) in order to install 32-bit only software (skype and steam).
You can only do that in the direction you mentioned - installing 32-bit libs and programs on a 64-bit OS. You can't do it in reverse. Like John VV said, the OP needs to back up his stuff and do a fresh install of the 64-bit version of his OS.
 
Old 05-01-2013, 12:10 PM   #5
Timothy Miller
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I figured it might be, but wasn't totally sure since it's been a LONG time since I read the multiarch howto page.
 
Old 05-01-2013, 12:18 PM   #6
ozar
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Hello

Like John VV above, I'd recommend doing a fresh install using the 64-bit release of your favorite distro, then restore any data to your new system. I'm a bigger fan of fresh installs rather than upgrades, hence my suggestion. Let us know how you get along with it.
 
Old 05-01-2013, 10:49 PM   #7
jpollard
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I think a fresh install would be MUCH easier.

You CAN do it - but you have to start with the 64 bit kernel (as it will also run 32 bit binaries)

But the time it would take to get all the 64 bit versions would seem to be horrible - getting the kernel would be the easy part...

Not impossible though. They way I would try

1. add a 64 bit kernel
2. add 64 bit repositories.
3. remove a 32 bit package, add the 64 bit package.

The problem is step 3 of course. What can easily happen is that the 32 bit package (already installed) would conflict with the 64 bit package (as the target could be the same directory). Hence the need to remove a 32 bit package first.

The problem to avoid is removing the package used to perform the installs. Easier from a rescue system... but then you may as well just reinstall.
 
Old 05-01-2013, 11:21 PM   #8
TroN-0074
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Fresh installation, which is good because this time you could setup a partition only for the root files and one partition for your data files. Next time you need to re install only have to do it on the root partition.

Good luck to you
 
Old 05-02-2013, 11:33 AM   #9
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save yourself some headaches and time, use a separate /home partition.
You can make this during your re-installation from 32>64.

Opinions vary, but 10 to 20 Gigs for /
Minimum 1 Gig('ish) of swap.
Rest for /home

Next time, God forbid, you just lose / and swap, all your stuff stays on the /home partition "untouched"
and unaffected by any OS installation(s).

Theoretically, you probably could get to 64 from 32 bit arch. but it is certain to be quite messy at the very least.
 
Old 05-02-2013, 01:03 PM   #10
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I'm looking to go from a 32-bit install to 64-bit also, and I also believe a fresh install will be the most fool-proof way to do it. This may not apply to you, but the downside of a fresh install for me is that I've heavily customized my current 32-bit system over the years, and I'll have to do it all over again. I've got probably 60 to 100 software packages installed on top of the ones supplied by the distro, and a bunch of servers that I've configured, and other customizations. I wish I'd kept better notes on past customizations and installs. It's not an insurmountable problem to find it all, back it all up, then reapply. But it'll be a time-consuming chore.
 
Old 05-02-2013, 04:44 PM   #11
bill_from_tampa
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If you are using a debian based system, you can get a list of all your installed programs
by running:

dpkg --get-selections > installed-software

This will create a text file of the stuff you have installed.
You can then reverse the process after the reinstallation:

dpkg --set-selections < installed-software

followed by use of dselect.

Or so I'm told...
 
Old 05-02-2013, 06:31 PM   #12
jpollard
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Z038 View Post
I'm looking to go from a 32-bit install to 64-bit also, and I also believe a fresh install will be the most fool-proof way to do it. This may not apply to you, but the downside of a fresh install for me is that I've heavily customized my current 32-bit system over the years, and I'll have to do it all over again. I've got probably 60 to 100 software packages installed on top of the ones supplied by the distro, and a bunch of servers that I've configured, and other customizations. I wish I'd kept better notes on past customizations and installs. It's not an insurmountable problem to find it all, back it all up, then reapply. But it'll be a time-consuming chore.
When you redo the non-distribution packages, be sure to put them somewhere OTHER than in the distribution used places.

Use /opt or even /usr/local.

Makes it MUCH easier to migrate. The problem with mixing them in is just what you have - you don't know all the files that have been altered, extended, or even configured.
 
  


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