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Old 09-17-2009, 07:23 AM   #1
Hustle
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How can I start my own Linux Distro?


Hi Everyone,

I was a MS Windows user for 11 years, 2 month ago I made the switch to Linux and have not looked back since .

I have my own home server and have been looking for a distro to install on it, but couldn't find a suitable one.

What I would like to do is build my own distro, command line based, the purpose of it is to run Apache, PHP & MySQL.

I am aware of the LFS project but that is desktop based from what I can see.

Can I take the Linux Kernel, put it into a bowl with Grub and something else to get a working distro of my own.

Many Thanks!

Last edited by Hustle; 09-17-2009 at 07:26 AM.
 
Old 09-17-2009, 07:31 AM   #2
linuxlover.chaitanya
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I would not recommend trying out writing own distro just to make a server for LAMP stack. That would not be worth the effort. Most of the distributions, or take it all, give your privilege to install the packages that you wish to.
And if you did not find a suitable distribution for your LAMP need, then most probably you did not put enough effort on that.
Just for LAMP, you can use any of the main stream distributions like Debian, Ubuntu server, CentOS, Slackware etc.
You can customize all of the distributions to exclude the graphical environments and get a server to only boot in run level 3. And even if you install gnome or kde by mistake, you can still disable booting into them.
 
Old 09-17-2009, 07:33 AM   #3
r3sistance
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I have not built my own linux distribution but I know some parts of the process since this is a question that has occured before.

Most linux distributions handle the installation for you to quite an extent, just taking the Linux Kernel, Apache, PHP, MySQL and Grub won't get you very far (and you need a shell too). Because the Kernel doesn't have the drivers for your system's hardware built into it, these have to be compiled into the kernel to even get the kernel to work. Their is even more work after that, I have seen sources about it and their are infact entire books dedicated to the process of making even a personal small distribution of linux for your own purposes.

I haven't used Gentoo myself but I'd possibly advise using that first as I believe generally it's rather cut-down to begin with and so you have to do the work of install the applications and all that yourself...

Personally tho if your just after a LAMP, I would advise looking into CentOS or Debian which do this job easily and relatively painlessly. Just do a minimum installation of either (tho install base for CentOS, it can be a little painful to not install the base package) and then they should have apache (httpd) but you can install it if not. Then all you should need is php, mysql and php-mysql (for php and mysql to talk). If you take these options I can give better details on how to do these installs, I have installed both more then a good number of times to these types of requirements due to the work I generally do.

Last edited by r3sistance; 09-17-2009 at 07:35 AM.
 
Old 09-17-2009, 07:33 AM   #4
repo
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Quote:
I have my own home server and have been looking for a distro to install on it, but couldn't find a suitable one.
Did you tried debian netinstall?
It will just install the base system.
You can add whatever you want.
 
Old 09-17-2009, 07:38 AM   #5
Hustle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by repo View Post
Did you tried debian netinstall?
It will just install the base system.
You can add whatever you want.
Is there a guide on installing the latest Apache MySQL & PHP on Debian, as the versions supplied by Debian are not the latest versions

Last edited by Hustle; 09-17-2009 at 07:41 AM.
 
Old 09-17-2009, 07:41 AM   #6
repo
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Take a look at
http://linux.justinhartman.com/Setting_up_a_LAMP_Server
 
Old 09-17-2009, 07:46 AM   #7
r3sistance
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EDIT: actually over what I have written I'd use repo's source.

I would have thought installing would have been as easy as...

apt-get install apache mysql-server php

you may need to switch apache with apache2 or httpd. Also you may need to also install the php-mysql module if it doesn't install from doing those two on the same line (again just "apt-get install php-mysql" alternative might be php5-mysql). Then each just comes down to configuring and using.

Last edited by r3sistance; 09-17-2009 at 07:48 AM. Reason: beat to it
 
Old 09-17-2009, 07:49 AM   #8
linuxlover.chaitanya
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You might just need to compile the packages for recent releases if they are not yet in the repositories.

http://www.aboutdebian.com/compile.htm
 
Old 09-17-2009, 11:04 AM   #9
damicatz
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If you really want to make your own distro, you should take a look at Linux from Scratch :
http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/. It's not inherently desktop or server based; what it does depends on how you configure it.

However, this is NOT for the faint of heart. Expect to spend considerable time doing this and expect considerable frustration. The upshot is that you'll probably be a Linux nerd by the time you finish it.

Last edited by damicatz; 09-17-2009 at 11:32 AM.
 
Old 09-17-2009, 11:14 AM   #10
EricTRA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by damicatz View Post
If you really want to make your own distro, you should take a look at Linux from Scratch :
http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/

However, this is NOT for the faint of heart. Expect to spend considerable time doing this and expect considerable frustration. The upshot is that you'll probably be a Linux nerd by the time you finish it.
I personally have to disagree on that LFS will take up a lot of time and will cause heaps of frustration. I don't have any experience compiling, nor am I a programmer. In comparison with other users here on LQ I know very little and have very much to learn. I started with LFS a couple of weeks ago spending a free hour now and then reading the LFS book, downloading and preparing everything. Once everything was in place it only took me two times 5 hours to complete the whole basic LFS compilation and I booted into my first LFS.

I've learned a lot from it and have found out a lot about Linux and the kernel. I'd say it's a great point to start if you really want to learn Linux.

I stumbled into it about 7 years ago if memory serves me well and am currently working as an all-round system administrator in a mixed environment AS/400, AIX, Windows 200=/2003, RHEL and Debian.

I have to admit that LFS has shown me things that I didn't know yet and now I'm getting into Slackware 13.

If you really want to learn Linux then get into LFS and Slackware, hang in there, read and learn, and with questions, come to LinuxQuestions. There are a lot of very intelligent people hanging around here.

Kind regards,

Eric
 
Old 09-17-2009, 08:40 PM   #11
salasi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hustle View Post

What I would like to do is build my own distro, command line based, the purpose of it is to run Apache, PHP & MySQL.
...or look at SLAMPP, which is a distro specifically intended to give you http/ftp/ssh/dhcp/mail servers and web admin in one easy hit.
 
Old 09-17-2009, 08:45 PM   #12
jefro
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See Gentoo.org for a self build setup. Not as nuts and bolts as build your own LFS but similar.

Their quote.

"We produce Gentoo Linux, a special flavor of Linux that can be automatically optimized and customized for just about any application or need. Extreme performance, configurability and a top-notch user and developer community are all hallmarks of the Gentoo experience"
 
Old 09-19-2009, 02:34 AM   #13
linuxlover.chaitanya
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If this is an experiment where you want to learn on a lot of things then it is ok to compile every package by hand. But on other hand if it is for some production environment where in you want everything to be on hand and just want to make it work then better way is to download the LAMP stack and install it. It will install all the packages for it and only thing that would then be required would be to configure it to put it to work.
 
  


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