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Old 07-26-2007, 07:15 AM   #1
Pete89
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Location: Granada Spain
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How can I check to see which libraries/software I am using


Hello,

I have been pushed into the deep end of the pool and its time to swim or start looking for a new job.

I just started a job as a LINUX System Admin with ZERO experience in LINUX administration. Sounds good right? Well I am hitting the learning curve at about 200mph......

They handed me a project to setup MYSQL cluster in a test enviroment as my first little test.

OK so I am dealing with dependencies which right now seem like Chinese crossword puzzles to me. Part of the documentation for this install says I need:

wxGTK2
Gtk+ >= 2.0
glibc ≥ 2.3.3 with TLS support (Thread Local Storage)
If gcc 4.x is installed on your system, you may also require libstdc compatibility libraries for gcc 3.2.x or gcc 3.3.x.

See that if gcc 4.x is installed blah blah blah. Well how can I see which versions of particular software/librries I am using?

Thanks for any help,

P.
 
Old 07-26-2007, 07:31 AM   #2
pwc101
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Which distro (version of Linux are you using)? Most distros (certainly at enterprise level) have a package manager of some sort. Take a look in the package manager of your system, find the application you're looking for, and it should tell you what version you're running.

Otherwise, you can try running the software from the command line with --version at the end:
Code:
gcc --version
For me, on RHEL3, I get:
Code:
361 pwc101@desktop:/tmp>gcc --version
gcc (GCC) 3.4.5 20051201 (Red Hat 3.4.5-2)
Copyright (C) 2004 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
This is free software; see the source for copying conditions.  There is NO
warranty; not even for MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
 
Old 07-26-2007, 07:41 AM   #3
Pete89
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Ok

Thanks for answering me so quickly. I am using Debian Etch server so I did what you said and voila:

Code:
bubba:/home/pete/Desktop# gcc --version
gcc (GCC) 4.1.2 20061115 (prerelease) (Debian 4.1.1-21)
Copyright (C) 2006 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
This is free software; see the source for copying conditions.  There is NO
warranty; not even for MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
bubba:/home/pete/Desktop#
Now I assume this is the telling me only the version in use and wont report on older libraries that may be installed but no longer used right?

So it looks like I need to install libstdc compatibility libraries for gcc 3.2.x or gcc 3.3.x.

But then I try and check for them and.... BOOM .....it blows up

Code:
bubba:/home/pete/Desktop# libstdc --version
bash: libstdc: command not found
bubba:/home/pete/Desktop# Gtk+ --version
bash: Gtk+: command not found
bubba:/home/pete/Desktop# glibc --version
bash: glibc: command not found
bubba:/home/pete/Desktop#

Thanks for helping
 
Old 07-26-2007, 08:10 AM   #4
pwc101
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That's where you can use the package manager - it'll tell you which libraries are installed (these packages are usually called lib-something).

Incidentally, if you're using a Debian system, you probably don't want to install packages manually (like I think you're doing at the moment?). If you're using .tar.gz or .tar.bz2 files, they're the source files, and need to be compiled. This can be a pain (although often it's perfectly easy). Debian has overcome the source-compile method by providing repositories of precompiled binaries accessible through their package manager (apt). This will install the program you want to install (mysql?) and any dependencies it requires.

I quickly googled "debian etch install mysql", and found this link: http://www.howtoforge.com/zabbix_net...ng_debian_etch, and it states:
Quote:
We use MySQL here, so we install the MySQL server and client first:
Code:
apt-get install mysql-server mysql-client
So it seems that to install it, you need only enter those commands in a Terminal, or use the package manager's graphical front end (aptitude? - I don't use Debian) to install it.

Hope this helps.
 
Old 07-26-2007, 08:19 AM   #5
Pete89
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Hey Thanks a lot. LINUX may be a little tough in the beginning but user support is great!!

I used this How To and got everything working in about 30 minutes:

http://www.howtoforge.com/loadbalanc...cluster_debian

But if you look to see Falko used an older version of MYSQL-max now called MAXDB. In fact he used version 5.0 and the latest is 7.6. So if we are going to put this into production I need to get it working on 7.6 for which Debian has no packages yet.

I am stuck in doing this the hardway and when its your first real project.....its real hard.

Thanks again
 
Old 07-26-2007, 08:26 AM   #6
pwc101
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There is a 7.6 Debian package, but it's "experimental", so I'm not sure how safe it is. Perhaps it will provide you with the necessary dependencies as more stable packages, after which you can install the actual MAXDB package from source with relative ease? The link for the debian experimental package is: http://packages.debian.org/experimen...-server-7.6.00

Good luck!
 
Old 07-26-2007, 08:51 AM   #7
Pete89
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Thank you. I will report back to document my findings.

Pete
 
  


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