LinuxQuestions.org
Download your favorite Linux distribution at LQ ISO.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices



Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 02-04-2006, 06:05 PM   #1
Crysm
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jun 2004
Location: USA
Distribution: Debian
Posts: 7

Rep: Reputation: 0
How can I add support for math emulation?


I'm trying to install Linux Router Project 2.9.8 on a 486SX2 50MHz CPU, and after dealing with a number of other problems, I came up with thiis error while booting the floppy: "No coprocessor found and no math emulation present. Giving up."


The boot floppy currently uses the following (from the boot messages):

Syslinux 1.42
LRP 2.9.8
Kernel 2.2.19-1-LRP
gcc 2.95.4 20011002 Debian Prerelease (Is this even important? It was listed with the other versions, so I included it.)


Any help in resolving this would be appreciated.
 
Old 02-04-2006, 06:08 PM   #2
amosf
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jun 2004
Location: Australia
Distribution: Mandriva/Slack - KDE
Posts: 1,672

Rep: Reputation: 46
Sounds like the kernel does not have math emulation compiled in... You would need a kernel that does or compile one (difficult in this case)...
 
Old 02-04-2006, 06:11 PM   #3
gilead
Senior Member
 
Registered: Dec 2005
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Distribution: Slackware64 14.0
Posts: 4,123

Rep: Reputation: 162Reputation: 162
Translating literally, the 486SX chip does not have a math coprocessor built in (the 486DX had one though) and your kernel was not compiled with CONFIG_MATH_EMULATION set to y.

I don't know if you can run this on another machine (one with a math coprocessor), but if you can't recompile the kernel, you can probably rebuild the boot disk with a different kernel from a linux distro.
 
Old 02-04-2006, 06:26 PM   #4
amosf
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jun 2004
Location: Australia
Distribution: Mandriva/Slack - KDE
Posts: 1,672

Rep: Reputation: 46
I'd suggest that at the least you grab a 486DX chip. You can get them for nothing. I have a pile of them somewhere here... You could stick in a dx2-50 or maybe even a dx4-100....

Or look for a pentium 100 at a dump somewhere...
 
Old 02-04-2006, 08:51 PM   #5
Crysm
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jun 2004
Location: USA
Distribution: Debian
Posts: 7

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
I do have a 486DX2 66MHz machine available. I don't know how to compile a new kernel though.
 
Old 02-04-2006, 09:02 PM   #6
amosf
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jun 2004
Location: Australia
Distribution: Mandriva/Slack - KDE
Posts: 1,672

Rep: Reputation: 46
Well, with the dx you wouldn't need to compile the kernel I'd say...
 
Old 02-04-2006, 09:28 PM   #7
sundialsvcs
Guru
 
Registered: Feb 2004
Location: SE Tennessee, USA
Distribution: Gentoo, LFS
Posts: 5,455

Rep: Reputation: 1172Reputation: 1172Reputation: 1172Reputation: 1172Reputation: 1172Reputation: 1172Reputation: 1172Reputation: 1172Reputation: 1172
Definitely true. The SX chip was literally a DX chip with the coprocessor turned off to put a chip at a lower price-point. I had one once, used it for a couple of years, and it wasn't pretty. Realistically speaking, if you have a DX-chip available, even for this simple project, then use that one.
 
Old 02-05-2006, 12:47 AM   #8
gilead
Senior Member
 
Registered: Dec 2005
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Distribution: Slackware64 14.0
Posts: 4,123

Rep: Reputation: 162Reputation: 162
That's good advice - installing on the DX machine will be simpler.
 
Old 02-05-2006, 08:03 PM   #9
Crysm
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jun 2004
Location: USA
Distribution: Debian
Posts: 7

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
The problem is that there doesn't seem to be a way to remove the SX2 chip. Additionally, this SX2 is made by Intel and the DX is made by AMD, so I'm not sure it'd be compatible anyways. The reason I can't just use the DX in its current machine is that the motherboard doesn't have enough slots for the NICs I want to use.

I hate to throw hardware away if it technically works, and I'd like to see this useful for something. In any case, I'm going to end up using them both, so one of them WILL need math emulation.


EDIT: Maybe my question wasn't clear. Can someone either tell me or direct me somewhere to show me how to compile a kernel with math emulation or swap out one without emulation for one with it?

Last edited by Crysm; 02-05-2006 at 08:09 PM.
 
Old 02-05-2006, 08:54 PM   #10
amosf
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jun 2004
Location: Australia
Distribution: Mandriva/Slack - KDE
Posts: 1,672

Rep: Reputation: 46
I'm surprised that the kernel doesn't have math emulation compiled it. I put a small version of linux (don't remember which) on a 386sx recently and had no trouble, so I am sure you can find a linux that will install, and then you can set that up as a router or whatever you want...

The amd chips work fine as well, BTW.
 
Old 02-06-2006, 05:23 PM   #11
Crysm
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jun 2004
Location: USA
Distribution: Debian
Posts: 7

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
The problem is that I've tried a number (about 10 or so) of other distributions on these machines and they won't boot or they freeze during the install process. Even if I managed to find one that worked perfectly, I don't know how to set up a router. I'm relying on someone else's code for that.

This is kind of why I'm posting in the Newbie forum. I don't know how to do all these things you're telling me to do. I can't compile a new kernel because I don't know how. I have yet to find another distro that only comes up with ONE error, and a fixable one at that. I have no idea how to set up a router.
 
Old 02-06-2006, 05:59 PM   #12
amosf
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jun 2004
Location: Australia
Distribution: Mandriva/Slack - KDE
Posts: 1,672

Rep: Reputation: 46
Is there a hardware problem on the machine? I've installed on a few older 386sx and 486 without too much trouble...

Setting up the router should not be a big deal once you get the OS installed. You can find plenty of ready made scripts that will do the job...

But I'm surprised that lrp (being old) didn't install. I would have thought it had math emulation built in...

The first router I used was just a trimmed back mandrake install with a script called firemasq... And I went on from there... Of course it's really easy to set up a router if you have a pentium and stick smoothwall on it
 
Old 02-06-2006, 07:39 PM   #13
sundialsvcs
Guru
 
Registered: Feb 2004
Location: SE Tennessee, USA
Distribution: Gentoo, LFS
Posts: 5,455

Rep: Reputation: 1172Reputation: 1172Reputation: 1172Reputation: 1172Reputation: 1172Reputation: 1172Reputation: 1172Reputation: 1172Reputation: 1172
Quote:
Originally Posted by amosf
I'm surprised that the kernel doesn't have math emulation compiled it. I put a small version of linux (don't remember which) on a 386sx recently and had no trouble, so I am sure you can find a linux that will install, and then you can set that up as a router or whatever you want...

The amd chips work fine as well, BTW.
It doesn't really surprise me that a stock kernel might have been built without that option turned on. It's almost never used or needed.
 
Old 02-07-2006, 01:26 AM   #14
amosf
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jun 2004
Location: Australia
Distribution: Mandriva/Slack - KDE
Posts: 1,672

Rep: Reputation: 46
I'm surprised that it would not be compiled in to something like the old LRP which was meant to be used on a 486...

Small distros meant for old boxes usually have it compiled in... I've installed onto even a 386sx25...

The idea of a stock kernel is to be somewhat overloaded so that it runs on the widest range of hardware... But I wouldn't expect math emulation to be in a i586 mandriva kernel, for example...
 
Old 02-07-2006, 06:00 AM   #15
mjjzf
Member
 
Registered: Feb 2004
Location: Valby, Denmark / Citizen of the Web
Distribution: Slackware 14.1
Posts: 879

Rep: Reputation: 38
Isn't the problem here that math emulation is enabled in the kernel - on a machine which can't handle it? Isn't the appropriate approach to discover how to disable math emulation?
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
how do you add NAS support to QT atomas123 Programming 3 12-21-2005 12:08 PM
Qemu Emulation of Win32/MacOSX Support/Tutorial on Linux initialdrifteg6 Linux - Software 12 02-15-2005 01:32 PM
Math Emulation Clariciation Jeebizz Slackware 4 09-15-2004 04:24 PM
help me to add support! ilectrcbob Linux - Newbie 1 06-19-2004 10:38 AM
Toshiba Satellite T1910; i486 Pentium I; no coprocessor or math emulation. sirquixote Linux - Distributions 8 12-06-2003 01:33 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:34 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration