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Old 04-14-2009, 12:51 AM   #1
chandan766
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how big can a root partition be?


Hi All,
I have Ubuntu 8.10 and want to install Oracle Applications. The installation of Oracle Apps will take 160GB. My laptop hard drive is 250 GB. Kindly advice on how to partition? Can I assign 180 GB to root and 10 GB to home? Also will i be later able to resize partitions if needed?
Too many questions....any help wud be appreciated..
thanks.
 
Old 04-14-2009, 01:05 AM   #2
vitalstrike82
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Yes you can. In fact you can partition first before you install linux.

For a more easier way to partition your hard disk, you can download g parted which is free: http://gparted.sourceforge.net/download.php

Its has a GUI interface for you to set the size of your partition. Simplay partition and install the OS.
 
Old 04-14-2009, 07:13 AM   #3
dasy2k1
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technically IIRC the limitation on ext3 filesysten size is 2EiB but i may be wrong in that
 
Old 04-14-2009, 07:17 AM   #4
r3sistance
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I can not say I have heard of Oracle Applications (I have heard of Oracle of course). If you are really really considering the ability to resize partitions then you might want to look into LVM as it's heavily based on being able to do that, But resizing partitions in any form is always dangerous and not something that should be done without making proper back-ups... I am guessing for such a large application, suggesting to make /var a minimum of 20GB and seperate maybe a good idea... however I would still check to see if their are any suggested partition schemes anywhere, perhaps even by Oracle themselves as I am not familar with this product I am afraid.
 
Old 04-14-2009, 08:39 AM   #5
chandan766
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Thanks guys for ur replies.
I just have a small doubt, will assigning 180 GB to root pose any threat or problem? Also as installed programs go to /usr/bin so i was thinking, assigning 180GB to root would be good. Any other suggestions would be welcome. What does /var do?
thanks.
 
Old 04-14-2009, 09:58 AM   #6
theNbomr
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At least one common strategy is to make the root partition relatively small, and use subdirectories within it as mountpoints for other partitions and filesystem types. If you intend to use a partition primarily as storage for a RDMS, you may want to consider this as a viable strategy. Consider, also, the filesystem type used for the Oracle data, as there may be a filesystem type that has optimal properties for such an application (that is, after all, why different filesystem types exist). I am sorry that I cannot advise you on what particular filesystem type actually is optimal for your application; perhaps others can comment with authority.
--- rod.
 
Old 04-14-2009, 11:22 AM   #7
kapilbajpai88
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Cool

Hi Chnadan,

you can assign 180GB to root, but it will not be a good idea. Is it possible for your oracle application to get installed in different components like reports, sql*plus, forms, ...etc
That way you can optimise the space as well, and /var directory should be given ample space as it will contain varialbe log files, RAM image of booting files, mail messgaes, other logs, ..etc

Cheers,
Kapil.
 
Old 04-14-2009, 01:24 PM   #8
maresmasb
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A 250 GB hard drives is not really considered extremely big these days. In your case I would rather go for keeping a separate boot and swap partition, but otherwise having everything else on the remaining root partition. This is not an optimal solution, but an easy one: even if Oracle tools need a known 160 GB of disk space, when using them they might need even more disk space for temporary files or logfiles, etc. You first need to install it and get to learn it's intricacies, before you can tailor an optimal system setup for it.

Last edited by Tinkster; 10-30-2010 at 03:26 PM.
 
Old 04-14-2009, 03:01 PM   #9
chandan766
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I dont think Oracle has provided any information on which file system to use and how to partition the hard drive in order to install Oracle Apps. However, can i partition the hard drive as follows:
swap---2GB
root---10GB
home---175GB can i install Oracle Apps in this directory?
var----10GB

If someone has any better plans to achieve this,,please help.
Thanks
 
Old 04-14-2009, 05:20 PM   #10
theNbomr
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Seems reasonable. Further to maresmasb's comment about trial installation for exploratory purposes, I would try to keep all of the Oracle stuff on one partition. If Oracle wants to put stuff in /var, then make the /var subdirectory part of the same partition that holds /home.
Your description 'Oracle Applications' makes me wonder how critical all of this is. My first interpretation was that this was going to a host for a database server. Running such a thing on a laptop seems like a bit of an odd fit, and now I'm wondering if this isn't actually just a collection of tools and ancillary programs that talk to a database server somewhere else. If this is the case, I suspect that there are not going to be any particular requirements in terms of partitioning, selection of filesystem, etc.
Can you clarify?
--- rod.
 
Old 04-14-2009, 07:12 PM   #11
chandan766
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No no,,,the oracle stuff is going to be on machine and does not have anything to talk any other machine at all....i think i better install it on one partition and check if it works fine.....i have heard some people do it on laptop and even on linux machines.....so i guess i can take it from here.....thanks guys once again,,,will report back....thank u all so much..
 
Old 04-14-2009, 10:24 PM   #12
chandan766
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When I assign 210 GB to /home , after Ubuntu installation it only shows me 180GB free, where is another 30 GB going? The same thing happens when I assign 210gb to root, it shows only 180GB.
Also I have dual boot with Windows Vista. This is getting a bit more difficult.
Thanks

Last edited by chandan766; 04-14-2009 at 11:35 PM.
 
Old 04-15-2009, 06:13 AM   #13
maresmasb
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The final partition size after installation can appear to be less, because the fileystem itself also uses disk space for it's meta data (inode infos, directory file lists, attributes, etc). For large partitions all this metadata takes a lot of disk space as well. It also depends on the block size that is used for the filesystem and how it handles sparse files.

To sum it up - you will always have to sacrifice some disk space for the filesystem housekeeping itself.

Last edited by maresmasb; 04-15-2009 at 01:03 PM.
 
Old 04-15-2009, 08:21 AM   #14
chandan766
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but losing 30 GB is a big thing......is there not anyway i can get it back....
 
Old 04-15-2009, 09:46 AM   #15
theNbomr
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A lot of the difference comes from the way sizes are specified. In hard-disk sales-speak, a GB is 1E9 bytes. In OS-speak, it is 2^30, or 10.74E9 bytes. There's 9.3% difference right there. Add to that the filesystem overhead, and you get what you see. As mentioned in an earlier post, you can optimize to some extent by choosing larger block sizes, but that is only appropriate if you don't store a lot of files smaller than 1 block. You aren't the first to notice this, and it has been this way forever. I'm over it, and the price of disk space seems too little to quibble over if you ask me.
--- rod.
 
  


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