LinuxQuestions.org

LinuxQuestions.org (/questions/)
-   Linux - Newbie (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-newbie-8/)
-   -   Horrific pain! How to make linux more managable for an ex-windows user (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-newbie-8/horrific-pain-how-to-make-linux-more-managable-for-an-ex-windows-user-353274/)

Wolvenmoon 08-14-2005 07:08 PM

Horrific pain! How to make linux more managable for an ex-windows user
 
Just finally got into mandrake on the default GUI. In windows 2K I could handle anything that was thrown at me, but this is absolutely slaughtering me. I tried to get wine working, that was a mistake.


Are there any windows-like GUIs? I can barely stand this beast! ARRG! I can't even hold down the backspace key to get it to continuously delete! How utterly annoying!

I saw winspire and was jealous, that would be a good step in the right direction 'stead of total immersion.

My scroll wheel isn't working... *Sigh.* Hope this gets a reply soon.

scuzzman 08-14-2005 07:14 PM

Look into KDE - it's a very Windows-like DE, and should be installed by default.
Also - read this article:
http://linux.oneandoneis2.org/LNW.htm

shane25119 08-14-2005 07:16 PM

Quote:

OWWWW! Linux is painful to learn! Total immersion is not the way to go.
You said it yourself. The best way to do it is slowly and a little bit at a time. What I did was I set up a separate system to be my Linux system and I tried to use it about 25% of the time and do various things on it (mount a USB drive, install a graphics driver, move files around etc.) I did this while searching for that 'perfect' Linux distro, I found it in Ubuntu. It may be different for you.

Expecting to switch, and quite so suddenly, without any difficulties is a fools errand. Yes Windows, you grow accustomed to it, and Linux seems weird and strange, but take the time to learn it, instead of complaining about it, and you will be amazed at how much more sense it makes. As for a 'Windows-like GUI', what do you want in it? What do you need your GUI to do for you? Try them all out. Me, I like Gnome, it reminds me a bit of OSX, at first I couldn't do anything in it, 4 months later I can do anything in it just as well as I used to in all the years of Windows.

To surmise, complaining won't help, being patient, learning a bit at a time, with the eventual goal of a full switch works well, for me, it was about 20 months to fully switch.

Shane

aysiu 08-14-2005 07:26 PM

Re: Horrific pain! How to make linux more managable for an ex-windows user
 
Quote:

Originally posted by Wolvenmoon
Just finally got into mandrake on the default GUI. In windows 2K I could handle anything that was thrown at me, but this is absolutely slaughtering me. I tried to get wine working, that was a mistake.
Wine is a great resource, but you're probably better off running native Linux apps on Linux. Here are Linux equivalents for Windows programs:

http://linuxshop.ru/linuxbegin/win-l...en/table.shtml

Quote:

Are there any windows-like GUIs? I can barely stand this beast! ARRG!
Windows-like in what way? Aren't you using KDE? That's the most Windows-like around. Maybe you'd like XPDE:

http://www.xpde.com/


Quote:

I can't even hold down the backspace key to get it to continuously delete! How utterly annoying!
Really? I've never had that problem in Gnome, KDE, or XFCE. What program are you talking about--OpenOffice?

Quote:

I saw winspire and was jealous,
No reason to be jealous. If you like Linspire, use it. That's what it's there for--people who want Linux to be exactly like Windows.

Quote:

that would be a good step in the right direction 'stead of total immersion.
Actually, here are some better steps as opposed to total immersion:

1. Getting an updated version of the distro you choose--how about Mandriva LE 2005?
2. Testing out distros using live CDs (Knoppix, Gnoppix, Ubuntu, Mepis, SuSE, etc.--even Linspire has a live CD version).
3. Setting up a dual-boot. That way you can boot into Windows when you want and use Linux when you want.

Quote:

My scroll wheel isn't working... *Sigh.* Hope this gets a reply soon.
Once again--get an updated version of Mandriva. Or how about trying another distro? Introducing...

The Linux Distribution Chooser

Just out of curiosity, why did you leave Windows?

lord-fu 08-14-2005 07:40 PM

To each his own but IMHO, I think total immersion is the way to go if you wanna really learn Linux and why it is the bad a** that it is. I say read all the books, join forums(this is by far the best I have found), and not, I repeat not give up. It is hard at first, but Mandrake ooops Mandriva is a good starting point, I started there, now I have 6 pc's running 3 are *nix boxes and 2 BSD's. Don't get discouraged, I guess thats what this long and redundant thread is about.

Wolvenmoon 08-14-2005 07:58 PM

Scuzzman, thank you, and by the way..I'm looking for the motorcycle, but I want training wheels :D

I fully expected this to be painful, I'd be surprised if it wasn't. Though I *DID* expect a 'panic button' like ctrl+alt+delete when I goof up with a program. Mainly what I am missing the most is the organized start menu, the my computer hard drive browsing, and the task manager. (Especially to see what was eating up system resources)

About the backspace thing, I'm talking about things like this forum. Am using Firefox, by the way.

After finishing the linux is not windows thing, I have one last comment on it. I want to be able to have a stable operating system that I can run things on while I learn how to use it.

I downloaded this distro day before yesterday...it was the latest version. Has it really already updated?

Okay, the distro chooser said debian for me, yes/no?

There are a number of reasons I switched off of win2K after having it run without a single crash for 2 and a half years.

1.Winrot was slowly eating the system alive, and after fixing a few other computers, I didn't want to start the whole thing over again.

2.Windows XP hides the configuration settings (Elsewhere) and that bugs the fire out of me.

3.Windows 2K did not support the 64 bit processor architecture.

4.Linux cut nearly 100% of the fat off of itself.

5.Linux seemed a friendlier enviroment to start learning C++ (First programming language I'm darting at)

6.Yesterday, as I was backing up my system and restarting to send some CD-images over the network, windows died 100%

Ug, this is such an alien enviroment for me.

BTW, as I remember things in my scatterbrained state of mind, I'm using Wine to run games, www.winehq.com had the games I played listed as working. It's been no end of trouble, the help file won't work, heh.

aysiu 08-14-2005 08:13 PM

Yes, Debian sounds right for you--fully customizable but also "friendly" and automatic to a certain extent. Just keep in mind that you'll see about seven CDs to download for Debian, but you need only the first one.

Wolvenmoon 08-14-2005 08:35 PM

WOOOOOO! Time to reinstall-again! XD Thanks for helping me out. As soon as I get the hang of this I'll come back and try to help out.

Wolvenmoon 08-14-2005 08:38 PM

Uhhh.. http://www.debian.org/CD/netinst/

IA64 is for the x86_64, not itanium 64, right? Or am I just wishfully thinking? --Nevermind, DANG!

shane25119 08-14-2005 10:11 PM

If I might add...

Firstly, sorry if I came across as an ass.

Secondly, Try Ubuntu, it has the power of Debian (being based on it) but if you need it, it has some training wheels.


Shane

kencaz 08-14-2005 10:36 PM

Wolvenmoon, A little advice... you can switch to Debian from Mandrake if you want but If your looking for a Windows Like Linux front end your not really going to find it...

I would say first of all if you want to learn Linux then don't try to make it like windows... If you have Mandrake already installed and are duel booting windows then I would suggest sticking with it and solving the problem rather then trying distro after distro...

Don't try to learn everything in one week... Start with a basic install and work on one problem at a time... You can alway's boot back to windows if your stuck and need to get some work done...

Even with the GUI's linux has today It's not an easy OS to understand at first... It's going to take some reading, researching, and posting problems to get everything the way you want it, but in the end, I'll bet you'll be dumping your windows partitian.

Just a thought

KC

Charred 08-14-2005 11:12 PM

Wolvenmoon,
Inhale.
Exhale.
Repeat.
You're doing just fine.

Vgui 08-15-2005 11:17 AM

Just noticed about the things you said you were missing. For a Start Menu, KDE or IceWM (or FVWM-95...which is kinda ugly) all have a similar menu.
For a "task manager", just run "top" in a terminal. There are plenty of graphical representations for this (I prefer gkrellm).
As for explorer, check out www.freshmeat.net and do a search for "file manager", I'm sure you will find something you like (they have a few Explorer clones).

JimBass 08-15-2005 12:01 PM

I LOVE Debian myself, but I do think I should warn you, it take much work to get it to a graphical interface. Unlike other distros, you have to start at the terminal from a net install, and go from there. Also, IA64 is NOT for x86_64. IA64 is strictly for Intel 64 bit machines. If you have an AMD 64 bit, you want this installer, which is not yet part of the stable tree in Debian, but works fine -- http://cdimage.debian.org/pub/cdimag...g/daily/amd64/

Just click on the newest of the links, and grab the .iso that ends with netinst.iso.

Debian is great, I love it and suggest it to anyone linux user, but it is a very steep first hill to climb. If you find Debian too difficult, you may like one of the distros people have mentioned above.

Peace,
JimBass

KimVette 08-15-2005 07:53 PM

IMHO the BEST way to learn Linux/*nix is to plunge headfirst into it. If your goal is to learn try Slackware, and force yourself to read man pages and do things the Unixy way rather than trying Windows methods before resorting to reading the "fine" manual.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:20 PM.