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Old 08-07-2012, 04:32 PM   #1
VicLopezAraiza
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Hor can I login in UBUNTU with administrative rights


Please tell me what should I do to login in Ubuntu with administrative rights
 
Old 08-07-2012, 04:34 PM   #2
TroN-0074
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I dont think you can log in to an entired session as root, however you can become root if you issue the command sudo -i
in a terminal
Good luck to you!
 
Old 08-07-2012, 05:11 PM   #3
273
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For resetting a forgotten password and other similar tasks hold down Left Shift and select the item with "(recovery mode)" after it. For anything else precede the command with sudo, for example:
Code:
sudo apt-get update
If you wish to enable root login it can be done but please see the following page and read it carefully:
https://help.ubuntu.com/community/RootSudo
 
Old 08-07-2012, 06:49 PM   #4
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The first user you created when you installed Ubuntu is automatically in the 'admin' group. But you can add other users to 'admin' group as well, which makes them administrators with the right to use 'sudo'.

More details here: http://www.psychocats.net/ubuntu/sudo
 
Old 08-07-2012, 06:49 PM   #5
chrism01
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As implied by TroN-0074, Ubuntu gives the first created user full root access rights via the 'sudo' cmd, so just prefix privileged cmds with that.
 
Old 08-07-2012, 07:21 PM   #6
guyonearth
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Enabling the Root account is rarely necessary. Almost everything you need to do as administrator of an Ubuntu system can be done via sudo or gksudo. If you really need a persistent Root login, the best alternative is to simulate a Root login shell using the following command...

Code:
sudo -i
To enable the Root account (i.e. set a password) use:

Code:
sudo passwd root
Logging in to X as root may cause very serious trouble. If you believe you need a root account to perform a certain action, please consult the official support channels first, to make sure there is not a better alternative.

Straight from the Ubuntu website.
 
Old 08-07-2012, 07:23 PM   #7
snowpine
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The OP asked nothing about root user, the question was administrative user. Administrator has a specific meaning in Ubuntu, it means a user who is in the 'admin' group and is therefore authorized to administer the system using 'sudo'. Must we turn this thread into another tired "don't log in as root" debate?
 
Old 08-07-2012, 07:45 PM   #8
273
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snowpine View Post
The OP asked nothing about root user, the question was administrative user. Administrator has a specific meaning in Ubuntu, it means a user who is in the 'admin' group and is therefore authorized to administer the system using 'sudo'. Must we turn this thread into another tired "don't log in as root" debate?
Indeed, you are right.
It's not our fault though that Canonical decided to go their own way, thus confusing Linux users.
I think I'll stay away from Ubuntu threads in future. Sorry I know that's negative and OT but it really is turning into Ubuntu OS now.
 
Old 08-07-2012, 07:55 PM   #9
guyonearth
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snowpine View Post
The OP asked nothing about root user, the question was administrative user. Administrator has a specific meaning in Ubuntu, it means a user who is in the 'admin' group and is therefore authorized to administer the system using 'sudo'. Must we turn this thread into another tired "don't log in as root" debate?
Since the first user IS administrative, and he mentioned a LOGIN, it could be assumed he MEANS root, and just used "administrative" because he's a crossover from Windows, since he can already log in as an administrative user.
 
Old 08-07-2012, 08:00 PM   #10
snowpine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 273 View Post
Indeed, you are right.
It's not our fault though that Canonical decided to go their own way, thus confusing Linux users.
I think I'll stay away from Ubuntu threads in future. Sorry I know that's negative and OT but it really is turning into Ubuntu OS now.
Ubuntu calls this group 'admin', Debian calls it 'sudo', and Fedora calls it 'wheel'. Since there is no standard terminology, someone is bound to be confused no matter what.
 
  


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