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Old 11-01-2016, 11:58 PM   #1
kmartin333
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Smile Hi There


Hi to all. I am new to the forum and new to Linux, currently playing around and learning Fedora 20 right now (was what was used in class). I like it so far, but still getting the hang of all the commands and such...it's a lot to take in! Especially since the class was just 10 weeks!

I just finished my Associate degree in August in cyber security and have not decided quite which way to go yet, but keep coming back to Linux and have even thought about programming. What wondering what advice you guys had to offer and how you best learned Linux? Anybody out there currently employed as Linux admin or similar? Pros/cons?

I currently work in the medical field, but am looking to leave it behind...hopefully soon. Any words of wisdom will be very much appreciated!
 
Old 11-02-2016, 12:02 AM   #2
Timothy Miller
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I learned linux simply by using it. I wasn't a fan of the licensing terms of Windows, so I learned how to use linux as my day to day OS.

I am employed as a linux sysadimin as well, but that's a very recent happening (3 months now). The pro's is that I'm actually happy at my job. First time in a while I can say that. Cons are that since I'm the ONLY linux-oriented sysadmin (the other full-time sysadmin knows linux, but is better at windows) at my job, pretty much anything go horribly wrong on one of the linux servers, I know who's going to be given the task of determining what happened.
 
Old 11-02-2016, 07:42 AM   #3
TB0ne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kmartin333 View Post
Hi to all. I am new to the forum and new to Linux, currently playing around and learning Fedora 20 right now (was what was used in class). I like it so far, but still getting the hang of all the commands and such...it's a lot to take in! Especially since the class was just 10 weeks!
The best advice I can give is stop using Fedora 20 right now, and load something current. You are WAY behind, and if you're not using the current versions of things, you're not going to know what's out there in the real world.
Quote:
I just finished my Associate degree in August in cyber security and have not decided quite which way to go yet, but keep coming back to Linux and have even thought about programming. What wondering what advice you guys had to offer and how you best learned Linux? Anybody out there currently employed as Linux admin or similar? Pros/cons?
The pros/cons are the same as pretty much any other job; you will have good days and bad. Very late nights/whole weekends spent solving problems, and weeks where you can cash in that time and work one day. Who knows?

The best way to learn Linux is the same as learning anything else; use it. Load the latest version of Fedora (pretty much ANY other distro will work fine too), and use it as your daily, desktop operating system. There is pretty much nothing you can't do with it, that you can do with Windows. That will give you a basic foundation...you'll then know how to load Linux, configure your desktop, set up programs, and know where those config files are, and how to edit them. Basics.

From there, solve problems that YOU have, or do things that you are curious about. Want to know about mail servers and/or their vulnerabilities? Then load one...configure it. Read up on it. Same with DNS, web services, databases, etc. Each time you do such things, you'll start to see where log files are, config files, etc., and learn troubleshooting skills. Solving those problems will teach you more than any book ever could. Do RESEARCH on your problems, BEFORE posting in forums asking for answers. If the first thing you do is post "I can't get MySQL to start!! Here's the error, tell me how to fix it!", you will have learned nothing except what someone told you. If you research that problem and have to find your OWN answers, then you will have KNOWLEDGE on how to solve the thousand other problems that AREN'T covered in your forum post.

Work hard, think, and approach problems rationally. Learn by doing...do NOT focus on a 'certification', but get the depth of knowledge first.
 
Old 11-02-2016, 08:20 AM   #4
linustalman
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Thumbs up

Greetings kmartin333.

Or should I say - 'What's up Doc?'
 
Old 11-02-2016, 08:34 AM   #5
erik2282
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I like Fedora for personal use, but to gain more Linux experience as its used in the enterprise business world, you may want to look at CentOS 7 ( https://www.centos.org/ ). Its pretty much a clone of Red Hat Enterprise Linux which is what a lot of big companies use. Centos is free to download and use, and Red hat is not free, you have to pay for licensing and support.
 
Old 11-02-2016, 10:48 AM   #6
rtmistler
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Hi and welcome to the forum.

One point to consider for this potential future is that a TON of the engineers whom I work with came from scientific and medical fields and the reason they became programmers was because when they were trying to accomplish their projects, programming was a very important aspect to their needs. So they self-learned a lot about programming in order to support their research or other projects they were looking to accomplish.

Further, knowledge of the medical field is important if you happen to work on software products for that field, a very rich industry for needing R&D of many varieties.

Best of luck! For Linux: Use it, program within it, and find the things you prefer to do as you move more towards programming assignments.
 
Old 11-02-2016, 11:01 AM   #7
Soadyheid
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Quote:
I just finished my Associate degree in August in cyber security
Hmmm... That looks very interesting in todays political climate. That and Linux knowledge could prove a good selling point on your CV.

Play Bonny!

 
Old 11-02-2016, 12:10 PM   #8
DavidMcCann
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If you are interested in security, you'll know the value of keeping up-to-date — i.e. not using a distro that has been unsupported for nearly 2 years!

I'd second the advice to get CentOS 7. That will be supported until 2024. CentOS is the second most popular distro for corporate web-servers and it's interchangeable with Red Hat, Scientific Linux (CERN), and Springdale (Princeton U).

As for learning, just keep doing things. Just remember the golden rule — never alter a configuration file without making a backup — and you'll be safe. A good book on Red Hat would help, too.
 
Old 11-02-2016, 12:37 PM   #9
linux4evr5581
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Fedora is where the bleeding edge software is tested on, which will eventually get ported to Red Hat. CentOS is a stable version of RedHat and is used mainly for I believe the backend servers that make up the network infrastructure of the company. Or used by companies who don't need/want to pay for RedHat's support.. RedHat is used by the actual users of a company for whatever their doing, and comes with great support and specialized software that suits their needs.. If you know how to use CentOS you know how to use Red Hat.. I heard SuSe is favored by UK, and RedHat by US.. If you're experienced with Linux and you need to configure a server that just does one specific task you can build your own Linux OS using LFS (Linux from scratch), so that server can be optimized for that specific task.. There's also Gentoo which is used primarily for embedded devices, so if you want a really secure device you can use Gentoo with GRsecurity/Pax which are LSMs (Linux security modules) used to harden the kernel. Or Yoctoo which is kinda like LFS but is specifically designed for making custom embedded OS's from scratch.. If you want to learn about alot of the types of security software available on Linux check out Security Onion which is a distribution that comes with a lot of these tools pre-installed. Also check out some firewall based distributions (preferably BSD based) such as PfSense, OPNsense or IPCOP.

Last edited by linux4evr5581; 11-03-2016 at 10:14 AM.
 
Old 11-02-2016, 01:00 PM   #10
szboardstretcher
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Quote:
Originally Posted by linux4evr5581 View Post
Fedora is where the bleeding edge software is tested on, which will eventually get ported to Red Hat. CentOS is a stable version of RedHat and is used mainly for I believe the backend servers that make up network infrastructure.
Fedora is a community maintained OS funded by RedHat.

Fedora Rawhide is the test bed for new software and features. Once accepted they will be ported to Fedora.

CentOS is a community maintained enterprise OS based off of the free RedHat Enterprise sources.

CentOS is generally used as a server operating system running Apache, Nginx, Varnish, Mysql etc etc etc. It is generally not known as "network infrastructure."
 
Old 11-02-2016, 01:11 PM   #11
linux4evr5581
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Quote:
Originally Posted by szboardstretcher View Post
Fedora is a community maintained OS funded by RedHat.

Fedora Rawhide is the test bed for new software and features. Once accepted they will be ported to Fedora.

CentOS is a community maintained enterprise OS based off of the free RedHat Enterprise sources.

CentOS is generally used as a server operating system running Apache, Nginx, Varnish, Mysql etc etc etc. It is generally not known as "network infrastructure."
Thanks for the clarification that's why I chose the word "I believe", I just downloaded CentOS yesterday for the first time as I now want want to get experience with it, to learn some sys admin skills... I just know its mainly used for the backed I believe, and Redhat is the internet facing (I think).... Or maybe some companies operate this way, I guess.

Last edited by linux4evr5581; 11-02-2016 at 01:15 PM.
 
Old 11-02-2016, 02:26 PM   #12
ardvark71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LinusStallman View Post
Or should I say - 'What's up Doc?'
I wonder if anyone else got that?

@kmartin333: Welcome to the forum, best wishes in your endeavors.

Regards...
 
Old 11-02-2016, 03:57 PM   #13
linustalman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ardvark71 View Post
I wonder if anyone else got that?

@kmartin333: Welcome to the forum, best wishes in your endeavors.

Regards...
Surely everyone's heard of our favorite bunny wabbit. ;-)
 
Old 11-03-2016, 02:52 AM   #14
kmartin333
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Thanks guys for the warm welcome and all the advice! I am downloading CentOS as I type this and will be reading the manuals and such later on. I knew I was behind with Fedora 20. I had just not taken the time to download a new version.

I never knew when I decided to go back to school for computers that there were SO MANY paths to take. Honestly, I feel a bit overwhelmed trying to decide which way I want to go, but no matter which way I go, I know that there will be jobs available. I also know that if one does not work out, I am not stuck like I am currently.

Hopefully I wont have to come here too often to ask questions, but know I will get the info I need! Thanks again!
 
Old 11-03-2016, 03:04 AM   #15
ardvark71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kmartin333 View Post
Thanks guys for the warm welcome and all the advice!
You're welcome

Quote:
Originally Posted by kmartin333 View Post
Hopefully I wont have to come here too often to ask questions, but know I will get the info I need! Thanks again!
Please feel free if you need to.

Regards...
 
  


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