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Old 09-24-2004, 07:22 PM   #1
breezewax
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Registered: Sep 2004
Location: san diego, ca
Distribution: Slackware 10.2
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help with Internet connection settings...


Hey all...

I've been on linux for about month now and love it...one question though...all my LimeWire downloads take FOREVER. I want to make sure that I've done all I can do as far as configuration to accelerate my internet connection. Any tips for a noob on doing this? Even nominal improvements would be mucho apprieciated.

On the same note...what kinds of things should a noobie generally configure after installing linux? I'm talking about settings that aren't automatically optimized durning a normal SuSE or Mandrake graphical installation....ie cache size or virtual memory settings that might improve performance?

hope that makes sense...

thanks...
 
Old 09-25-2004, 12:04 AM   #2
masand
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Registered: May 2003
Location: INDIA
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hi there

for a newbie i would say that u should close down the services u do not require.
like network service if u r not a LAN ,close down NFS and smb and related services

use good browser like fire-fox to browse internet sothat u get good speed

regards
 
Old 09-26-2004, 08:02 PM   #3
breezewax
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Location: san diego, ca
Distribution: Slackware 10.2
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Original Poster
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First off, thanks for the reply...

Okay, unfortunately the only access I have to my configuration settings is through SuSE's GUI configuration program YaST. I have very little understanding of networking components and even less of unix commands at the prompt. Appearently YaST is telling me that NFS and the Network Services are currently disabled. Now "being on a LAN"...is a cable modem system a LAN, or do I have to have other computers in my house set up to read and write to each other to be on a LAN? I know it sounds elementary, but I have no clue

thanks in advance
 
Old 09-26-2004, 09:59 PM   #4
Bruce Hill
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Registered: Jun 2003
Location: McCalla, AL
Distribution: Funtoo
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Quote:
Originally posted by breezewax
First off, thanks for the reply...

Okay, unfortunately the only access I have to my configuration settings is through SuSE's GUI configuration program YaST. I have very little understanding of networking components and even less of unix commands at the prompt. Appearently YaST is telling me that NFS and the Network Services are currently disabled. Now "being on a LAN"...is a cable modem system a LAN, or do I have to have other computers in my house set up to read and write to each other to be on a LAN? I know it sounds elementary, but I have no clue

thanks in advance
A LAN is a local area network. It's not a cable modem, but a
network of computers in a relatively small area - as opposed
to a wan (wide area network), which is a connection of LANs.
You can get a lot of definitions from Webopedia

Not to sound like an elitist, or a jackass, but one of the reasons
I'm migrating from Windoze to Linux is because of those GUIs and
the lack of knowledge they produce. There's only so much you
can do to a system when you're dependent upon someone elses
pretty eye-candy frontend (GUI).

My journey with Linux began with RedHat. For me, I found that the
GUIs were keeping me from learning how my computer works, and
making it difficult, if not impossible, to detect and fix the real source
of a problem. When you work from cli (command line interface) as
much as possible, you can usually see what's happening, and when
there's a problem you have an idea of where to start to fix it.

So I moved to Slackware, and away from the RedHat (and other) type
systems that are built around GUIs to attract Windoze users.

For the computer enthusiast this will be refreshing. For someone who
only wants to browse the web, send/receive email, play some music
and videos, and write office documents - then a GUI system is all that
person really needs. Just like Windoze. Use what it's got, and when it
begins to fail or stop working as well, reinstall.

If, however, one wants to learn about their computer, and tweak it's
performance, one will have to learn cli. That's the beauty of Linux for me.
I can make my comptuer run as well as it's capable, and also change the
way programs work to suit my desires, or my system, rather than having
them work "reasonably well for every Tom, Dick and Harry" - so to speak.

If you've got the time for some reading, and the desire to learn more about
how the Linux OS works, here are some execellent online references:

Introduction to Linux

Rute User's Tutorial and Exposition

The Unix and Internet Fundamentals HOWTO
as well as other HOW-TOs by Eric S. Raymond availabe at his website
 
Old 09-29-2004, 10:30 PM   #5
breezewax
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Registered: Sep 2004
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excelent reply...best i've gotten so far on LQ. especially the links...i've noticed that most people give short explanations to posts, and end them without suggesting actual sites to get the information. sometimes, the power of google is overwhelming and makes finding quality sources a pain in the ass. i've been hitting the networking protocols tutorials nightly, and doing the same with linux commands. i'll be posting topics like mad for the next couple years ;-) thanks again
 
Old 09-29-2004, 11:41 PM   #6
Bruce Hill
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Registered: Jun 2003
Location: McCalla, AL
Distribution: Funtoo
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I hope everything works out well for you. I build and repair computers,
and can squeeze the blood out of Windoze. But I found the blood to be
badly tainted.

When I first starting using Linux in June 2003, I tried to do everything here
that I'd been doing in Windoze, but it wasn't possible. Some of my apps
just didn't have suitable open source replacements, and the learning curve
was pretty steep. Where I live, there are no Linux books in English. So
I've had to depend upon whatever I can find online. Just recently I've started
to read the stuff I posted to you, and it's really helping me. Once you begin
to learn how Linux works, it's easier to fix it when it breaks - or to configure
something that's brand new.

And LinuxQuestions.org has been invaluable!!!

In case you didn't know, you can run multiple operating systems on the same
hard drive - and even span things across hard drives. At one point I had
Slackware for learning Linux; Mandrake because it just detected all my hardware
and was easy, sort of like Windoze but with the Linux kernel; and Windoze when
I absolutely had to get some work done that I couldn't do in either of those
Linux distributions. So don't let people intimidate you by their comments. I hate
Windoze as much as the next guy, but this afternoon I'm going to have to copy
some VCDs, and unless I can compile, configure, and learn how to use vcdimager
in the next few hours - I'll have to boot into Windoze to "get the job done."

You'll find in forums and mailing lists that most of the guys who "really know Linux"
will only give you a short answer. They expect us to Google and read everything
that's ever been written on the subject, just like they had to do, rather than spoon
feeding us. Which is good. As the old saying goes, "Give a man a fish, and you
feed him for a day; teach a man to fish, and you feed him for life."

Welcome to the community...
 
Old 08-13-2005, 11:44 PM   #7
fortezza
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Registered: Mar 2003
Location: Colorado
Distribution: Fedora Core 4
Posts: 297

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Streamlining Linux

One way to get more performance out of Linux ( or any OS, for that matter ) is to turn off uncessary services. Here is a guide I used to identify and disable services I did not need on my server and workstation systems. - http://www.hosef.org/wiki/DisablingLinuxServices .

In the future I plan on putting together a nice guide to tweaking Linux, though with all of the customizability of Linux it is going to be hard to touch on everything ( such as using a fast Window Manager like Fluxbox ). But as long as someone benefits, I think it will be worth it.
 
  


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