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Old 12-22-2005, 07:56 AM   #1
meiya
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Registered: Dec 2005
Location: Bandung, Indonesia
Distribution: Suse
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Help the unborn baby


Am not a newbie, but unborn yet, so I need to know:
1. How to create a Linux fileserver?
2. What db engine to use?
3. Is Kylix OK?
4. For future development, server must be able to be accessed from my home and ready to serve my clients through internet.

The current situation is I hv:
1. Netware 5.0 server
2. Running Btrieve db engine
3. Programs are written in Delphi 7.0

Thx for ANY help...
 
Old 12-22-2005, 10:23 AM   #2
shane25119
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Well, I would tinker on a spare box for now... no sense in eliminating your present configuration while you are still learning the ropes. For a fileserver many Linux distrobutions can be custom installed with servers in mind. Personally I use a Debian server; but Slackware, Gentoo and Red Hat are popular as well. For a file server you can use wu-ftp
 
Old 12-24-2005, 03:59 AM   #3
meiya
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How about Suse? You mean when I setup a distro, I can choose whether it will become a server or workstation? How can I tell which is what?
 
Old 12-24-2005, 04:08 AM   #4
tekyd
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Registered: Mar 2005
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soem distros when they install give u the option. like in redhat 9 graphic intall it give you the option of server, workstation and a couple of others.
 
Old 12-24-2005, 04:21 AM   #5
meiya
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So like the old netware 2, a server can also be a workstation at the same time? There are too many distros available, it only get me confused what to use, and got no time to try one by one. HEEELLLLLLLPPPPPP PLEASE....
 
Old 12-24-2005, 04:24 AM   #6
tekyd
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i think. all i know is that when you do an install of a distro what kind of comp it is is up to what packages you install.

i like redhat but i only use it in network not with remote access. but im only using it in a home network nothing corprate.
 
Old 12-24-2005, 06:31 AM   #7
DarkElf109
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I'd personally recommend Debian, and I've heard good things about Ubuntu Server. Word of advice though: Don't use Gentoo for a server. Compiling everything from scratch leaves a lot open to problems. Debian's nice and tested, generally regarded as well secure. As far as what programs to use to share everything, that's up to you. It really doesn't depend on the distro. A plus of Debian and Ubuntu, though, is a centralized package database, so you don't need to go hunting around looking for a .rpm. Just my 2 cents =)
 
Old 12-24-2005, 10:25 AM   #8
JaseP
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Distribution: K/Ubuntu 12.04/14.04, Scientific Linux 6.3/6.4, Android-x86, Pretty much all distros at one point...
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Any distro can be a file server...

All you need to have is a basic Linux setup with SAMBA running...
Having plenty of disk space and a healthy amount of RAM is a plus too...

Just use the graphical setup tools to setup the server and then just allow the video hardware to suspend... you don't even have to drop down to a command line... Just make sure you are logged out of root... and configure the system so that you can only go root locally... you don't want anyone trying to hack your box...

It might make sense to have a virus scanner like AVG for Linux running too... It might help to screen for Windoze viruses (there are VERY few Linux viruses and they don't propogate).
 
Old 12-24-2005, 02:51 PM   #9
shane25119
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Try this::::

http://www.zegeniestudios.net/ldc/
 
Old 12-29-2005, 09:47 AM   #10
meiya
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My Linux (Suse 10.0) was just born, but I still get confused.
Is this statement correct? "Suse 10.0 and other distros are just like OS DOS 3.30, and the KDE is the WIN.COM (Windows 3.1)".
And since it's Intel Architecture, then the BIOS interrupt are the same? and the ASSEMBLY code the same?
What's the equivelant in Linux for the following:
AUTOEXEC.BAT
CONFIG.SYS
EXECUTABLE FILES EXTENTION (.EXE, .COM)
 
Old 12-29-2005, 12:18 PM   #11
stress_junkie
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Your understanding is a good model of Linux vs. a Linux GUI. You are correct that Linux is just a command line environment. If you just have Linux on a computer it will look a lot like running MS-DOS. You are also correct that the GUI is like Windows v3.1 on MS-DOS v5.0 as far as function is concerned.

I hope that the following information isn't more than you wanted to know.

AUTOEXEC.BAT
The autoexec.bat file is really a series of files. The initial boot configuration script is listed in the /etc/inittab file. All of the files in the /etc/init.d directory are startup scripts. Your system may or may not run any one of them during startup. It depends on your run level. If you see a graphic login when you start your system then you are running at run level 5. If you see a screen that looks like MS-DOS then you are (probably) running at run level 3. Your default system run level is set in the /etc/inittab file. There is a directory for each run level. These are (usually) in the /etc/init.d directory or in the /etc directory. They have names to indicate which run level they configure. These names are rc0.d, rc1.d, rc2.d, rc3.d, rc4.d, rc5.d and rc6.d. So if your system starts up and is set to run at run level 5 then the init process will read the /etc/inittab file to find the default run level, the initial boot script name, and some other goodies that it needs to know. Then it runs the intial boot script. Then it goes to the proper rc?.d directory and runs all of the files listed whose name starts with a K. Then it goes to the same directory and runs all of the files whose name starts with an S. Then the system is ready to use.

CONFIG.SYS
The equivalent of the CONFIG.SYS file in Linux is also a group of files. These files are almost always located in the /etc directory and almost always have names that end in ".conf". You will see them if you enter the following command.
ls /etc/*conf

Executable file extensions.
There are no file extensions in Linux to designate a file as executable. In truth Linux and Unix have no meaningful file extensions at all (well except for the conf files mentioned above). Some applications like rpm have meaningful file extensions but the basic Linux system does not. You can create file associations in several of the GUI environments such as KDE and Gnome. These file associations are not part of Linux. They are part of the GUI. Some people, like myself, like to add meaningful file extensions in some types of files. For instance I like to add ".txt" to text files and I like to add ".sh" to bash shell scripts. However the use of these kinds of meaningful file extensions is not common.

There is a utility named "file" that will help you to determine what type of information is in any given file. Here are some examples.

# file /etc/inittab
/etc/inittab: ASCII English text

# file /bin/dmesg
/bin/dmesg: ELF 32-bit LSB executable, Intel 80386, version 1 (SYSV), for GNU/Linux 2.2.5, dynamically linked (uses shared libs), stripped

Last edited by stress_junkie; 12-29-2005 at 12:44 PM.
 
  


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